Special Issue "Marine Metrology and Oceanographic Measurements 2020"

A special issue of Journal of Marine Science and Engineering (ISSN 2077-1312). This special issue belongs to the section "Chemical Oceanography".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 5 November 2022 | Viewed by 1938

Special Issue Editors

Dr. Francesca Rolle
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Istituto Nazionale di Ricerca Metrologica (INRiM), National Institute of Metrological Research, Turin, Italy
Interests: metrology in chemistry and environmental pollutants; development of analytical methods for the quantification of gaseous atmospheric pollutants and organic micropollutants
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals
Dr. Michela Sega
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Istituto Nazionale di Ricerca Metrologica (INRiM), National Institute of Metrological Research, Turin, Italy
Interests: gas analysis; organic analysis

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Characterization of the status of the oceans has a particular significance from an environmental point of view, particularly in relation to climate change.

Many physical and chemical parameters (essential climate variables) are monitored worldwide, and their long-term determination is of utmost importance to support climate change modeling. The reliability of such measurements is an essential feature to discriminate between natural variations or systematic trends. In this framework, there is a growing need to build a strong metrological infrastructure for marine measurements to support the worlds of marine observation and data management. The strengthening of the cooperation among different communities (metrological, oceanographic, instrument producers) is the key starting point.

The aim of this Special Issue is to collect valuable contributions on the developments and achievements in the fields of marine metrology and oceanographic observations, including method development, sensors characterization, and data quality and management.

This Special Issue will host selected papers from the “2020 IMEKO TC-19 International Workshop on Metrology for the Sea”, but other contributions are also welcome.

Dr. Francesca Rolle
Dr. Michela Sega
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Journal of Marine Science and Engineering is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2000 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • EOV (essential ocean variables)
  • metrological traceability and comparability
  • data harmonization and data quality
  • reference standards

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

Article
Improved Current Estimates from Spar Buoy-Mounted ADCP Measurement Station: A Case Study in the Ligurian Sea
J. Mar. Sci. Eng. 2021, 9(5), 466; https://doi.org/10.3390/jmse9050466 - 26 Apr 2021
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 552
Abstract
Current measurements in the open sea are generally acquired by Acoustic Doppler Current Profilers (ADCPs). In the case of ADCPs mounted on spar buoy, current profiles require to be post-processed, to properly take into account the buoy influence: in fact, ADCP compass may [...] Read more.
Current measurements in the open sea are generally acquired by Acoustic Doppler Current Profilers (ADCPs). In the case of ADCPs mounted on spar buoy, current profiles require to be post-processed, to properly take into account the buoy influence: in fact, ADCP compass may reflect alterations induced by the metal structure of the buoy and apparent currents can occur due to the large displacement of the platform. Uncertainty analysis is finally required to properly consider both these effects and to compute robust velocity estimates. A new methodology is tested for a measurement station in the Ligurian Sea, where an ADCP was mounted on the surface buoy of the W1-M3A (Western 1 Mediterranean Moored Multisensor Array) oceanographic observatory, facing upwards at the depth of about 40 m. Marine current numerical models and historical data in the area have been used as a basis for comparison to test the consistency of the proposed method. A very good agreement is obtained. Only minor discrepancies are reported (e.g., monthly averages from the reference model slightly underestimate the west-east current component along the entire profile), but, in general, the application of the proposed methodology ensures that the spar buoy-mounted ADCP system is able to provide reliable measurements for oceanographic studies and validation of 3D hydrodynamic models. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Marine Metrology and Oceanographic Measurements 2020)
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Article
Sea State Monitoring by Ship Motion Measurements Onboard a Research Ship in the Antarctic Waters
J. Mar. Sci. Eng. 2021, 9(1), 64; https://doi.org/10.3390/jmse9010064 - 09 Jan 2021
Cited by 5 | Viewed by 753
Abstract
A parametric wave spectrum resembling procedure is applied to detect the sea state parameters, namely the wave peak period and significant wave height, based on the measurement and analysis of the heave and pitch motions of a vessel in a seaway, recorded by [...] Read more.
A parametric wave spectrum resembling procedure is applied to detect the sea state parameters, namely the wave peak period and significant wave height, based on the measurement and analysis of the heave and pitch motions of a vessel in a seaway, recorded by a smartphone located onboard the ship. The measurement system makes it possible to determine the heave and pitch acceleration spectra of the reference ship in the encounter frequency domain and, subsequently, the absolute sea spectra once the ship motion transfer functions are provided. The measurements have been carried out onboard the research ship “Laura Bassi”, during the oceanographic campaign in the Antarctic Ocean carried out in January and February 2020. The resembled sea spectra are compared with the weather forecast data, provided by the global-WAM (GWAM) model, in order to validate the sea spectrum resembling procedure. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Marine Metrology and Oceanographic Measurements 2020)
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Planned Papers

The below list represents only planned manuscripts. Some of these manuscripts have not been received by the Editorial Office yet. Papers submitted to MDPI journals are subject to peer-review.

1. Essential Ocean Variables for Marine Environment Monitoring: Metrological Case Studies

Francesca Rolle, Michela Sega, Francesca Romana Pennecchi, Andrea Merlone, Chiara Musacchio, Graziano Coppa

Abstract: Monitoring of the state of oceans and its evolution in space and time is of fundamental importance, due to the relevance and impact they have on the Earth’s global cycle. Oceans are a crucial source of food, water, energy and minerals, they cover 71 % of the Earth’s surface and play a central role in regulating its climate, serving also as a natural sink for carbon emissions. Due to the enhanced greenhouse effect, oceans have been disproportionately impacted by climate change: they are constantly becoming warmer, more acidic and showing a marked stratification. These changes have altered ecosystems and increased the vulnerability of many marine species. The Global Ocean Observing System (GOOS), a programme of UNESCO Intergovernmental Oceanographic Commission (IOC), has established a framework for ocean observation centred on Essential Ocean Variables (EOVs). GOOS Expert Panels identified 31 EOVs that include physical (e.g. temperature, salinity, currents, ice), biogeochemical (e.g. dissolved gases and nutrients, acidification, particulate matter and tracers) and biological (e.g. phytoplankton) parameters. The importance of these variables for the monitoring of oceans’ state is underlined by the presence of 19 GOOS EOVs among the 54 Essential Climate Variables (ECVs) defined by the Global Climate Observing System (GCOS). The monitoring of the EOVs is fundamental to assess the status of the marine environments. However, in many cases a multidisciplinary and coordinated approach to establish fundamental metrological concepts in EOV observations is lacking. In this context, documented traceability to the International System of Units for EOVs to establish improved comparability among different sites and measuring methods, including proper quality assurance tools (e.g. reference materials, interlaboratory comparisons, uncertainty evaluation) are current needs. In the present paper, a literature review of some EOVs is presented (partial pressure of CO2; stable carbon isotopes; surface, subsurface and deep ocean temperature), reporting on recent studies and results, with a focus on relevant metrological open issues.

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