Measuring, Monitoring and Modeling the Ocean Waves: Possible Combined Uses for Advances and Future Perspectives

A special issue of Journal of Marine Science and Engineering (ISSN 2077-1312). This special issue belongs to the section "Physical Oceanography".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (1 November 2022) | Viewed by 6074

Special Issue Editors


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Guest Editor
Institute for Electromagnetic Sensing of the Environment (IREA), National Research Council of Italy (CNR), Napoli, Italy
Interests: ocean monitoring; radar imaging; surface waves; ocean engineering; inverse problems; coastal bathymetry; microwave tomography
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Guest Editor
Department of Civil and Building Engineering and Architecture, Università Politecnica delle Marche, I-60131 Ancona, Italy
Interests: coastal hydraulics; shallow water modeling; estuarine dynamics; hydropower generation
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Sea level rise and an increase in sea storminess are only some of the effects caused by climate change and variability. These phenomena interact at different temporal and spatial scales and play a fundamental role in coastal vulnerability and resilience, thus severely affecting the natural environment, residential areas, local ecosystems, existing engineering works, recreational and tourist activities, among others. Therefore, to prevent and/or mitigate such impact, a constant monitoring and a detailed analysis of the sea state are needed.

Currently, a large variety of sensors and models fulfill these requirements and are available to monitor and forecast the phenomena that govern the ocean waves. These tools provide a large amount of data relating to, for example, measurements of hydrodynamic parameters, reconstruction of wave motion and seabed morphology, as well as the prediction of meteo-marine events and beach inundation. However, such tools are rarely integrated to perform a deep and accurate analysis of the ocean waves and the phenomena related to their propagation toward the coast.

The Special Issue in intended to publish studies based on the combination of data provided by the above-mentioned tools (e.g., integration between field observations and numerical findings), in order to enhance the understanding of wave propagation and hydrodynamics in the coastal region in light of climate and environmental change.

Dr. Giovanni Ludeno
Dr. Matteo Postacchini
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

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Keywords

  • Open sea and coastal areas
  • Ocean dynamics
  • Hydrodynamics
  • Beach inundation
  • Field and lab experiments
  • Sensors
  • Remote sensing
  • Analytical and numerical modeling

Published Papers (3 papers)

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Research

11 pages, 2303 KiB  
Article
Laboratory Experiments on the Influence of the Wave Spectrum Enhancement Factor on a Rubble Mound Breakwater
by Hosny Bakali, Ismail Aouiche, Najat Serhir, Youssef Zahir, El hassan Ziane, Abderrazak Harti, Zakariae Zerhouni and Edward Anthony
J. Mar. Sci. Eng. 2022, 10(12), 2035; https://doi.org/10.3390/jmse10122035 - 19 Dec 2022
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Abstract
This paper experimentally explored the influence of the wave spectrum shape variation on breakwater design. The energy spectrum function generally considered for the design of coastal structures is the JONSWAP spectrum. The laboratory results were therefore used to assess the impact of changing [...] Read more.
This paper experimentally explored the influence of the wave spectrum shape variation on breakwater design. The energy spectrum function generally considered for the design of coastal structures is the JONSWAP spectrum. The laboratory results were therefore used to assess the impact of changing the spectrum shape parameter (PEF). We analysed armour stability and wave overtopping in a wave flume with a geometric similarity ratio of 1:30. The experimental results showed that the PEF has maximum influence on overtopping and wave pressures on the crown wall. For a PEF value of 3.3, overtopping was much higher (30% to 100% higher) than with a PEF of 1. Pressure on the crown wall was 20% higher with a PEF of 3.3 in comparison with that for a PEF equal to 1. The stability of the breakwater’s block armour is less sensitive to the PEF variation. Full article
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15 pages, 4430 KiB  
Article
First-Order Ocean Surface Cross Section for Shipborne Bistatic HFSWR: Derivation and Simulation
by Yonggang Ji, Xu Liang, Weifeng Sun, Weimin Huang, Yiming Wang, Xinling Wang and Zhihao Li
J. Mar. Sci. Eng. 2022, 10(5), 649; https://doi.org/10.3390/jmse10050649 - 10 May 2022
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Abstract
A bistatic high-frequency surface wave radar (HFSWR) with both receiving and transmitting stations placed on different ships (platforms) is a new radar system and referred to as shipborne bistatic HFSWR. In this paper, a first-order ocean surface cross section of shipborne bistatic HFSWR [...] Read more.
A bistatic high-frequency surface wave radar (HFSWR) with both receiving and transmitting stations placed on different ships (platforms) is a new radar system and referred to as shipborne bistatic HFSWR. In this paper, a first-order ocean surface cross section of shipborne bistatic HFSWR was derived. The first-order cross-section models for three different cases, i.e., ships moving with uniform, periodic, and hybrid motion states, respectively, are presented. The corresponding first-order Doppler spectra were simulated, and the spread width of the first-order spectrum was investigated. The simulation results show that the characteristics of the first-order spectrum are similar to those of a shore-based bistatic HFSWR when the transmitting and receiving platforms move in opposite directions. The first-order spectral spread width in the case of platforms with opposite directions is much smaller than that in the case of platforms with the same direction. This finding is useful for reducing HFSWR first-order spectrum spread due to platform motion, thus improving the target detection performance of the shipborne bistatic HFSWR. In addition, periodic oscillation motion of both platforms will cause complex motion-induced peaks in the first-order spectrum, which may be detrimental to target detection and ocean remote sensing. These results have important implications for the application of shipborne bistatic HFSWR. Full article
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21 pages, 7265 KiB  
Article
Seasonal Variability of Near-Inertial Internal Waves in the Deep Central Part of the Black Sea
by Elizaveta Khimchenko, Alexander Ostrovskii, Alexey Klyuvitkin and Leonid Piterbarg
J. Mar. Sci. Eng. 2022, 10(5), 557; https://doi.org/10.3390/jmse10050557 - 19 Apr 2022
Cited by 3 | Viewed by 2021
Abstract
This observational study is concerned with the seasonal variability of near-inertial internal waves (NIWs) in the central part of the Black Sea. Rotary spectral analysis of the nearly year-long time series of the sea current velocity measurements at 100 m and 1700 m [...] Read more.
This observational study is concerned with the seasonal variability of near-inertial internal waves (NIWs) in the central part of the Black Sea. Rotary spectral analysis of the nearly year-long time series of the sea current velocity measurements at 100 m and 1700 m revealed the prevailing anticyclonic component of the motions near the local inertial frequency f. Both the rotary spectra and the visual exploration of the time series showed that the peaks of NIWs were blue-shifted to higher frequencies. The monthly average blue-shift was stronger up to 1.038f in the summer. It was found that the minimum intensification of the NIWs occurred in summertime and the maximum intensification was characteristic of the autumn-winter period when the NIW packets included up to 16 waves with pronounced clockwise rotation of the velocity vectors. Full article
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