Special Issue "Marine Propellers and Ship Propulsion"

A special issue of Journal of Marine Science and Engineering (ISSN 2077-1312).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 20 April 2020.

Special Issue Editors

Dr. Diego Villa
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Electrical, Electronics and Telecommunication Engineering and Naval Architecture Department (DITEN), University of Genova, Genoa, Italy
Interests: fluid mechanics; ocean engineering; computational fluid dynamics; naval engineering; CFD simulation propeller and propulsion
Dr. Stefano Gaggero
E-Mail
Guest Editor
Department of Electrical, Electronics and Telecommunication Engineering and Naval Architecture Department (DITEN), University of Genova, Genoa, Italy
Dr. Giorgio Tani
E-Mail
Guest Editor
Department of Electrical, Electronics and Telecommunication Engineering and Naval Architecture Department (DITEN), University of Genova, Genoa, Italy

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Marine propellers are one of the main components of a ship propulsion plant. Their performance, primarily in terms of efficiency, is a key point for a proper propulsion system design. New stringent requirements for ship operability (including, for instance, response to off-design conditions or dynamic positioning), and even stricter limits regarding environmental and comfort issues (e.g., radiated noise, induced pressure pulses, and resulting hull vibrations) pose new goals and serious constraints to their design and their matching with the whole propulsion system. In the context of this competitive scenario, even more accurate design and analysis tools are necessary. In light of this, computational fluid dynamics (CFD) methods have significantly grown in capability for both industrial applications and research activities, but they are still far from surpassing medium-fidelity codes (e.g., BEM) and model-scale experiments for reliable, efficient, and industrial time-constrained design processes.

The aim of this Special Issue of Marine Science and Engineering is devoted to collecting and sharing experiences coming from both research and technical activities, as well as from numerical and experimental investigations in the field of propellers and propulsion. New or improved design approaches of all types of marine propulsors, studies on new types of propellers and propulsion systems, the analysis of hydrodynamic and structural interactions between devices, marine hydroacoustics, as well as propulsor dynamics and innovative energy saving devices, indifferently dealt with any numerical and experimental approach, are welcome and will be considered for this Special Issue.

Dr. Diego Villa
Dr. Stefano Gaggero
Dr. Giorgio Tani
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Journal of Marine Science and Engineering is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1200 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • propellers
  • propulsion systems
  • computational fluid dynamics (CFD)
  • experimental fluid dynamics (EFD)
  • propulsion side effects
  • propeller optimization
  • propulsion in off-design conditions
  • self-propulsion
  • unconventional propulsion systems
  • hydro-acoustics

Published Papers (5 papers)

Order results
Result details
Select all
Export citation of selected articles as:

Research

Open AccessArticle
Identifying Unregulated Emissions from Conventional Diesel Self-Ignition and PPCI Marine Engines at Full Load Conditions
J. Mar. Sci. Eng. 2020, 8(2), 101; https://doi.org/10.3390/jmse8020101 - 08 Feb 2020
Abstract
A study on unregulated emissions of a conventional diesel self-ignition and partial premixed compression ignition (PPCI) marine engine at full load condition was performed, respectively. In this work, PPCI was realized in a marine engine by blending 15% diesel with 85% light hydrocarbons [...] Read more.
A study on unregulated emissions of a conventional diesel self-ignition and partial premixed compression ignition (PPCI) marine engine at full load condition was performed, respectively. In this work, PPCI was realized in a marine engine by blending 15% diesel with 85% light hydrocarbons (LHC). Gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) was used to detect and identify unregulated emissions, and the chemical formula and peak area of representative species were obtained. Furthermore, the unregulated emissions were classified and semi-quantitatively analyzed. The results show that the maximum in-cylinder pressure of PPCI is almost 11 bar lower than that of conventional diesel combustion, and the crank angle at that moment is also delayed by 2 °CA. Compared to conventional diesel combustion, the maximum pressure rise rate of PPCI is reduced by 3.5%, while the maximum heat release rate of PPCI increases by 23.5%. Further, PPCI produces fewer species in unregulated emissions, and their chemical formula are less complex than that of conventional diesel combustion. Compared to conventional diesel combustion, the relative concentration of alkane and organic components in PPCI decreases significantly, while ketone and ester increase. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Marine Propellers and Ship Propulsion)
Open AccessArticle
Influence of EEDI (Energy Efficiency Design Index) on Ship–Engine–Propeller Matching
J. Mar. Sci. Eng. 2019, 7(12), 425; https://doi.org/10.3390/jmse7120425 - 22 Nov 2019
Abstract
With the increasingly strict international GHG (greenhouse gas) emission regulations, higher requirements are placed on the propulsion system design of conventional ships. Playing an important role in ship design, construction and operation, ship–engine–propeller matching dominantly covers the CO2 emission of the entire [...] Read more.
With the increasingly strict international GHG (greenhouse gas) emission regulations, higher requirements are placed on the propulsion system design of conventional ships. Playing an important role in ship design, construction and operation, ship–engine–propeller matching dominantly covers the CO2 emission of the entire ship. In this paper, firstly, a ship propulsion system matching platform based on the ship–engine–propeller matching principle and its application on WinGD 5X52 marine diesel engine have been investigated. Meeting the energy efficiency design index (EEDI) regulation used to calculate the ship CO2 emission is essential and ship–engine–propeller matching has to be carried out with EEDI into consideration. Consequently, a procedure is developed combining the system matching theory and EEDI calculation, which can provide the matching results as well as the corresponding EEDI value to study the relationship between EEDI and ship–engine–propeller matching. Furthermore, a comprehensive analysis is performed to obtain the relationship of EEDI and system matching parameters, such as ship speed, effective power and propeller diameter, reflecting the trend and extent of EEDI when changing these three parameters. The results of system matching parameters satisfying different EEDI phases indicate the initial value selection in matching process to provide reference for the design of ship, engine and propeller under the EEDI regulations. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Marine Propellers and Ship Propulsion)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Open AccessArticle
Grid Type and Turbulence Model Influence on Propeller Characteristics Prediction
J. Mar. Sci. Eng. 2019, 7(10), 374; https://doi.org/10.3390/jmse7100374 - 20 Oct 2019
Abstract
This paper evaluates the applicability of the hexahedral block structured grids for marine propeller performance predictions. Hydrodynamic characteristics for Potsdam Propeller Test Case (PPTC), namely thrust and torque coefficients, were determined using numerical simulations in two commercial solvers: Ansys Fluent and STAR-CCM+. Results [...] Read more.
This paper evaluates the applicability of the hexahedral block structured grids for marine propeller performance predictions. Hydrodynamic characteristics for Potsdam Propeller Test Case (PPTC), namely thrust and torque coefficients, were determined using numerical simulations in two commercial solvers: Ansys Fluent and STAR-CCM+. Results were attained for hexahedral and tetrahedral hybrid grids equivalent in terms of cell count and quality, and compared to the experimental results. Furthermore, accuracy of Realizable k- ϵ and SST k- ω turbulent models when analyzing marine propeller performance was investigated. Finally, performance characteristics were assessed in cavitating flow conditions for a single advance ratio using Zwart–Gerber–Belamri and Schnerr and Sauer models. The resulting cavitation pattern was compared to cavity extents and shape noted during measurements. The results suggest that hexa and hybrid grids, in certain range of advance ratios, do provide similar results; however, for low and high ratios, structured grids in conjunction with Realizable k- ϵ model can achieve more accurate results. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Marine Propellers and Ship Propulsion)
Show Figures

Graphical abstract

Open AccessArticle
Hydro-Acoustic and Hydrodynamic Optimization of a Marine Propeller Using Genetic Algorithm, Boundary Element Method, and FW-H Equations
J. Mar. Sci. Eng. 2019, 7(9), 321; https://doi.org/10.3390/jmse7090321 - 16 Sep 2019
Abstract
Noise generated by ships is one of the most significant noises in seas, and the propeller has a significant impact on the noise of ships, which reducing it can significantly lower the noise of vessels. In this study, a genetic algorithm was used [...] Read more.
Noise generated by ships is one of the most significant noises in seas, and the propeller has a significant impact on the noise of ships, which reducing it can significantly lower the noise of vessels. In this study, a genetic algorithm was used to optimize the hydro-acoustic and hydrodynamic performance of propellers. The main objectives of this optimization were to reduce the propeller noise and increase its hydrodynamic efficiency. Modifying the propeller geometry is one of the most effective methods for optimizing a propeller performance. One of the numerical methods for calculating propeller noise is the Ffowcs Williams and Hawkings (FW-H) Model. A numerical code was developed by authors which solved these equations using the velocity and pressure distribution around the propeller and calculated its noise. To obtain flow quantities and to investigate the hydrodynamic performance of the propeller, a code was developed using a Boundary Element Method, the panel method. The geometry of DTMB 4119 propeller was selected for optimization, where geometric modifications included skew angle, rake angle, pitch to diameter (P/D) distribution, and chord to diameter (c/D) distribution. Finally, the results of geometric optimization were presented as Pareto optimal solutions. The results indicated that the optimum geometries had rake angles between 8.14 and 12.05 degrees and skew angles between 31.52 and 39.74 degrees. It was also observed that the increase in the chord up to a specific limit enhanced the efficiency and reduced the noise of the propeller. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Marine Propellers and Ship Propulsion)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Open AccessArticle
Investigation of Lumped-Mass Method on Coupled Torsional-longitudinal Vibrations for a Marine Propulsion Shaft with Impact Factors
J. Mar. Sci. Eng. 2019, 7(4), 95; https://doi.org/10.3390/jmse7040095 - 04 Apr 2019
Abstract
Severe vibrations of the marine propulsion shaft can evidently affect the dynamical response of the propulsion system and degrade the performance of a ship. As the vibration forms couples which interact with each other, a better understanding of the coupled vibrations is essential [...] Read more.
Severe vibrations of the marine propulsion shaft can evidently affect the dynamical response of the propulsion system and degrade the performance of a ship. As the vibration forms couples which interact with each other, a better understanding of the coupled vibrations is essential for dynamic prediction to improve the efficiency and reliability of the marine propulsion system. Thus, an investigation of the lumped-mass method for coupled torsional-longitudinal vibrations of the shaft is proposed. First, a theoretical solution for the coupled ordinary differential equations demonstrates the accuracy of the proposed lumped-mass model. This model allows for the bifurcation diagram and the Poincare surface, and transient accelerations of the coupled vibrations are numerically calculated. Furthermore, the impact factors including various length-diameter ratios, coupling stiffness coefficients, and damping coefficients are respectively discussed. These impact factors are found to affect the coupled vibrations to different extents through the comparison of the transient accelerations. Finally, an accurate and applicative lumped-mass method for the coupled torsional-longitudinal vibrations of the marine propulsion shaft has been obtained. An optimal design and vibration reduction of the shaft, considering the above-mentioned impact factors, can be achieved. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Marine Propellers and Ship Propulsion)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Back to TopTop