Special Issue "Towards Sustainable Manufacturing Processes"

A special issue of Journal of Manufacturing and Materials Processing (ISSN 2504-4494).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (31 January 2019)

Special Issue Editor

Guest Editor
Prof. Hossam Kishawy

Department of Automotive, Mechanical and Manufacturing Engineering, Faculty of Engineering and Applied Science, University of Ontario Institute of Technology, 2000 Simcoe Street North Oshawa, Ontario L1H 7K4 Canada
Website | E-Mail
Interests: Manufacturing; Sustainable Machining Processes; Modeling and Optimization

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues, 

During the past decades, health and environmental concerns have arisen because of the pollution and consumption of natural resources. To address these concerns and provide effective solutions, sustainability has become an essential feature of modern manufacturing. Providing environmentally friendly processes and optimizing energy consumption are two essential requirements to achieve sustainable manufacturing. The concept of sustainable manufacturing is described and analyzed at three main levels, namely, product, process, and system. The interaction among the three levels paves the road to achieve the desired goals.  Environmental, economic, and social aspects of sustainability have to be taken into account to ensure an effective utilization of the available resources.

With this in mind, a Special Issue entitled “Towards Sustainable Manufacturing Processes” is being launched. This Special Issue includes high-quality papers dealing with modeling, simulation, optimization, and assessment of sustainable manufacturing processes. Both original research articles as well as review articles are welcome.

Prof. Hossam Kishawy
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Journal of Manufacturing and Materials Processing is an international peer-reviewed open access quarterly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) is waived for well-prepared manuscripts submitted to this issue. Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Published Papers (5 papers)

View options order results:
result details:
Displaying articles 1-5
Export citation of selected articles as:

Research

Jump to: Review, Other

Open AccessArticle
Laser Surface Structuring of Cemented Carbide for improving the Strength of Induction Brazed Joints
J. Manuf. Mater. Process. 2019, 3(2), 44; https://doi.org/10.3390/jmmp3020044
Received: 1 April 2019 / Revised: 9 May 2019 / Accepted: 29 May 2019 / Published: 3 June 2019
PDF Full-text (11965 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
The effect of micro patterning of cemented carbide surface using nanosecond diode pumped solid-state pulsed laser on the strength of induction brazed carbide and steel joints has been investigated. Surface patterns increase the total surface area of the joint and, for an originally [...] Read more.
The effect of micro patterning of cemented carbide surface using nanosecond diode pumped solid-state pulsed laser on the strength of induction brazed carbide and steel joints has been investigated. Surface patterns increase the total surface area of the joint and, for an originally hydrophilic surface, increase the wettability of a liquid on a solid surface such that, instead of building droplets, the liquid spreads and flows on the surface. Microcomputed tomography (µ-CT) was used to observe the filler/carbide interface after brazing and to analyze the presence of porosity or remnant flux in the joint. Microstructures of the brazed joints with various surface patterns were analyzed using scanning electron microscopy. The strength of the joints was measured using shear tests. Results have shown that the groove pattern on the surface of carbide increases the joint strength by 70–80%, whereas, surface patterns of bi-directional grooves (grid) reduced the joint strength drastically. Dimples on the carbide surface did not show any improvement in the strength of the brazed joints compared to samples with no surface pattern. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Towards Sustainable Manufacturing Processes)
Figures

Figure 1

Open AccessArticle
Effect of Water-Based Nanolubricants in Ultrasonic Vibration Assisted Grinding
J. Manuf. Mater. Process. 2018, 2(4), 80; https://doi.org/10.3390/jmmp2040080
Received: 10 October 2018 / Revised: 15 November 2018 / Accepted: 26 November 2018 / Published: 3 December 2018
Cited by 1 | PDF Full-text (3537 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Currently, because of stricter environmental standards and highly competitive markets, machining operations, as the main part of the manufacturing cycle, need to be rigorously optimized. In order to simultaneously maximize the production quality and minimize the environmental issues related to the grinding process, [...] Read more.
Currently, because of stricter environmental standards and highly competitive markets, machining operations, as the main part of the manufacturing cycle, need to be rigorously optimized. In order to simultaneously maximize the production quality and minimize the environmental issues related to the grinding process, this research study evaluates the performance of minimum quantity lubrication (MQL) grinding using water-based nanofluids in the presence of horizontal ultrasonic vibrations (UV). In spite of the positive impacts of MQL using nanofluids and UV which are extensively reported in the literature, there is only a handful of studies on concurrent utilization of these two techniques. To this end, for this paper, five kinds of water-based nanofluids including multiwall carbon nanotube (MWCNT), graphite, Al2O3, graphene oxide (GO) nanoparticles, and hybrid Al2O3/graphite were employed as MQL coolants, and the workpiece was oscillated along the feed direction with 21.9 kHz frequency and 10 µm amplitude. Machining forces, specific energy, and surface quality were measured for determining the process efficiency. As specified by experimental results, the variation in the material removal nature made by ultrasonic vibrations resulted in a drastic reduction of the grinding normal force and surface roughness. In addition, the type of nanoparticles dispersed in water had a strong effect on the grinding tangential force. Hybrid Al2O3/graphite nanofluid through two different kinds of lubrication mechanisms—third body and slider layers—generated better lubrication than the other coolants, thereby having the lowest grinding forces and specific energy (40.13 J/mm3). It was also found that chemically exfoliating the graphene layers via oxidation and then purification prior to dispersion in water promoted their effectiveness. In conclusion, UV assisted MQL grinding increases operation efficiency by facilitating the material removal and reducing the use of coolants, frictional losses, and energy consumption in the grinding zone. Improvements up to 52%, 47%, and 61%, respectively, can be achieved in grinding normal force, specific energy, and surface roughness compared with conventional dry grinding. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Towards Sustainable Manufacturing Processes)
Figures

Figure 1

Open AccessArticle
A Computer-Aided Sustainable Modelling and Optimization Analysis of CNC Milling and Turning Processes
J. Manuf. Mater. Process. 2018, 2(4), 65; https://doi.org/10.3390/jmmp2040065
Received: 20 August 2018 / Revised: 7 September 2018 / Accepted: 25 September 2018 / Published: 27 September 2018
PDF Full-text (3670 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
The sustainability of a manufacturing process can be measured by three main factors which impact both ecological and financial constraints. These factors are the energy required to achieve a specific job, the material utilized for the job, and the time taken to complete [...] Read more.
The sustainability of a manufacturing process can be measured by three main factors which impact both ecological and financial constraints. These factors are the energy required to achieve a specific job, the material utilized for the job, and the time taken to complete that job. These factors have to be quantified and analysed so that a proper manufacturing system can be designed to optimize process sustainability. For this purpose, a computer package, which utilizes life cycle inventory models has been presented for CNC (Computer Numerical Control) milling and turning processes. Based on utilization of resources and production stages, the job completion time for the turning and milling processes can be divided into process (i.e., machining), idle and basic times. As parameters are different for evaluating the process times, i.e., depth and width of cut in case of milling, initial and final diameters for turning, two different case studies are presented, one for each process. The effect of material selection on the sustainability factors has been studied for different processes. Our simulations show that highly dense and hard materials take more time in finishing the job due to low cutting speed and feed rates as compared to soft materials. In addition, face milling takes longer and consumes more power as compared to peripheral milling due to more retraction time caused by over travel distance and lower vertical transverse speeds than the horizontal transverse speed used in a peripheral retraction process. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Towards Sustainable Manufacturing Processes)
Figures

Figure 1

Review

Jump to: Research, Other

Open AccessReview
Support Structures for Additive Manufacturing: A Review
J. Manuf. Mater. Process. 2018, 2(4), 64; https://doi.org/10.3390/jmmp2040064
Received: 13 August 2018 / Revised: 14 September 2018 / Accepted: 19 September 2018 / Published: 20 September 2018
Cited by 8 | PDF Full-text (6052 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Additive manufacturing (AM) has developed rapidly since its inception in the 1980s. AM is perceived as an environmentally friendly and sustainable technology and has already gained a lot of attention globally. The potential freedom of design offered by AM is, however, often limited [...] Read more.
Additive manufacturing (AM) has developed rapidly since its inception in the 1980s. AM is perceived as an environmentally friendly and sustainable technology and has already gained a lot of attention globally. The potential freedom of design offered by AM is, however, often limited when printing complex geometries due to an inability to support the stresses inherent within the manufacturing process. Additional support structures are often needed, which leads to material, time and energy waste. Research in support structures is, therefore, of great importance for the future and further improvement of additive manufacturing. This paper aims to review the varied research that has been performed in the area of support structures. Fifty-seven publications regarding support structure optimization are selected and categorized into six groups for discussion. A framework is established in which future research into support structures can be pursued and standardized. By providing a comprehensive review and discussion on support structures, AM can be further improved and developed in terms of support waste in the future, thus, making AM a more sustainable technology. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Towards Sustainable Manufacturing Processes)
Figures

Figure 1

Other

Jump to: Research, Review

Open AccessData Descriptor
Full-Density Fused Deposition Modeling Dimensional Error as a Function of Raster Angle and Build Orientation: Large Dataset for Eleven Materials
J. Manuf. Mater. Process. 2019, 3(1), 6; https://doi.org/10.3390/jmmp3010006
Received: 9 December 2018 / Revised: 7 January 2019 / Accepted: 9 January 2019 / Published: 14 January 2019
Cited by 1 | PDF Full-text (25817 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text | Supplementary Files
Abstract
This paper describes the collection of a large dataset (6930 measurements) on dimensional error in the fused deposition modeling (FDM) additive manufacturing process for full-density parts. Three different print orientations were studied, as well as seven raster angles (0, 15 [...] Read more.
This paper describes the collection of a large dataset (6930 measurements) on dimensional error in the fused deposition modeling (FDM) additive manufacturing process for full-density parts. Three different print orientations were studied, as well as seven raster angles ( 0 , 15 , 30 , 45 , 60 , 75 , and 90 ) for the rectilinear infill pattern. All measurements were replicated ten times on ten different samples to ensure a comprehensive dataset. Eleven polymer materials were considered: acrylonitrile butadiene styrene (ABS), polylactic acid (PLA), high-temperature PLA, wood-composite PLA, carbon-fiber-composite PLA, copper-composite PLA, aluminum-composite PLA, high-impact polystyrene (HIPS), polyethylene terephthalate glycol-enhanced (PETG), polycarbonate, and synthetic polyamide (nylon). The samples were ASTM-standard impact-testing samples, since this geometry allows the measurement of error on three different scales; the nominal dimensions were 3.25 mm thick, 63.5 mm long, and 12.7 mm wide. This dataset is intended to give engineers and product designers a basis for judging the accuracy and repeatability of the FDM process for use in manufacturing of end-user products. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Towards Sustainable Manufacturing Processes)
Figures

Figure 1

J. Manuf. Mater. Process. EISSN 2504-4494 Published by MDPI AG, Basel, Switzerland RSS E-Mail Table of Contents Alert
Back to Top