Special Issue "Selective Laser Melting: Materials and Applications"

A special issue of Journal of Manufacturing and Materials Processing (ISSN 2504-4494).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 August 2019

Special Issue Editor

Guest Editor
Prof. Dr. Konda Gokuldoss Prashanth

Department of Mechanical and Industrial Engineering, Tallinn University of Technology, Ehitajate tee 5, 19086 Tallinn, Estonia
Website | E-Mail
Interests: powder bed fusion processes (laser (SLM)/electron beam (EBM)); selective laser sintering (SLS); powder metallurgy; meta-stable materials (including amorphous materials); light metals; materials joining and structure–property correlation in metals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Selective laser melting (SLM) also known as the laser-based power bed fusion process is one of the power-based additive manufacturing techniques that has been widely used to fabricate metallic materials. This process has the capability of processing 3D parts, theoretically, without any shape restrictions with added functionality. There are several aspects that play a crucial role in producing a defect-free component. Some of them are: (1) initial powder quality (composition, particle shape, particle size, particle size distribution, flowability of the powder, etc.); (2) process parameters (laser power, laser scan speed, hatch style, hatch distance, laser spot size, laser focus offset, layer thickness, etc.); and (3) the atmosphere of the chamber (inert gas, its flow rate, the pressure inside the chamber during processing, etc.). Hence, it attracts significant research and warrants a Special Issue devoted to the various aspects of the SLM process.

We are particularly interested in (but not limited to) contributions that focus on topics such as:

  • Alloy design for SLM
  • Novel materials processing including functionally graded materials, amorphous materials, quasicrystalline materials, high entropy alloys, etc.
  • Parameter optimization
  • Microstructural characterization
  • Microstructure–property correlations
  • Process simulations and properties simulation
  • Topological optimization
  • Process development
  • 4D SLM process
  • Applications

Prof. Konda Gokuldoss Prashanth
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

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Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Journal of Manufacturing and Materials Processing is an international peer-reviewed open access quarterly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) is waived for well-prepared manuscripts submitted to this issue. Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Selective Laser Melting
  • Alloys
  • Microstructure
  • Properties

Published Papers (4 papers)

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Research

Open AccessArticle
Effect of SLM Build Parameters on the Compressive Properties of 304L Stainless Steel
J. Manuf. Mater. Process. 2019, 3(2), 43; https://doi.org/10.3390/jmmp3020043
Received: 23 April 2019 / Revised: 21 May 2019 / Accepted: 29 May 2019 / Published: 2 June 2019
PDF Full-text (1161 KB)
Abstract
Selective laser melting (SLM) is well suited for the efficient manufacturing of complex structures because of its manufacturing methodology. The optimized process parameters for each alloy has been a cause for debate in recent years. In this study, the hatch angle and build [...] Read more.
Selective laser melting (SLM) is well suited for the efficient manufacturing of complex structures because of its manufacturing methodology. The optimized process parameters for each alloy has been a cause for debate in recent years. In this study, the hatch angle and build orientation were investigated. 304L stainless steel samples were manufactured using three hatch angles (0°, 67°, and 105°) in three build orientations (x-, y-, and z-direction) and tested in compression. Analysis of variance and Tukey’s test were used to evaluate the obtained results. Results showed that the measured compressive yield strength and plastic flow stress varied when the hatch angle and build orientation changed. Samples built in the y-direction exhibited the highest yield strength irrespective of the hatch angle; although, samples manufactured using a hatch angle of 0° exhibited the lowest yield strength. Samples manufactured with a hatch angle of 0° flowed at the lowest stress at 35% plastic strain. Samples manufactured with hatch angles of 67° and 105° flowed at statistically the same flow stress at 35% plastic strain. However, samples manufactured with a 67° hatch angle deformed non-uniformly. Therefore, it can be concluded that 304L stainless steel parts manufactured using a hatch angle of 105° in the y-direction exhibited the best overall compressive behavior. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Selective Laser Melting: Materials and Applications)
Open AccessArticle
Effect of HIP Treatment on Microstructure and Fatigue Strength of Selectively Laser Melted AlSi10Mg
J. Manuf. Mater. Process. 2019, 3(1), 16; https://doi.org/10.3390/jmmp3010016
Received: 15 December 2018 / Revised: 2 January 2019 / Accepted: 29 January 2019 / Published: 1 February 2019
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Abstract
This study shows the effect of hot isostatic pressing (HIP) on the porosity and the microstructure, as well as the corresponding fatigue strength of selectively-laser-melted (SLM) AlSi10Mg structures. To eliminate the influence of the as-built surface, all specimens are machined and exhibit a [...] Read more.
This study shows the effect of hot isostatic pressing (HIP) on the porosity and the microstructure, as well as the corresponding fatigue strength of selectively-laser-melted (SLM) AlSi10Mg structures. To eliminate the influence of the as-built surface, all specimens are machined and exhibit a polished surface. To highlight the effect of the HIP treatment, the HIP specimens are compared to a test series without any post-treatment. The fatigue characteristic is evaluated by tension-compression high cycle fatigue tests under a load stress ratio of R = −1. The influence of HIP on the microstructural characteristics is investigated by utilizing scanning electron microscopy of micrographs of selected samples. In order to study the failure mechanism and the fatigue crack origin, a fracture surface analysis is carried out. It is found that, due to the HIP process and subsequent annealing, there is a beneficial effect on the microstructure regarding the fatigue crack propagation, such as Fe-rich precipitates and silicon agglomerations. This leads, combined with a significant reduction of global porosity and a decrease of micro pore sizes, to an improved fatigue resistance for the HIPed condition compared to the other test series within this study. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Selective Laser Melting: Materials and Applications)
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Open AccessArticle
Effect of Build Orientation on the Microstructure and Mechanical Properties of Selective Laser-Melted Ti-6Al-4V Alloy
J. Manuf. Mater. Process. 2018, 2(4), 69; https://doi.org/10.3390/jmmp2040069
Received: 9 September 2018 / Revised: 10 October 2018 / Accepted: 10 October 2018 / Published: 12 October 2018
Cited by 3 | PDF Full-text (7891 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
One of the challenges of additive manufacturing (AM) technology is the inability to generate repeatable microstructure and mechanical properties in different orientations. In this work, the effect of build orientation on the microstructure and mechanical properties of Ti–6Al–4V specimens manufactured by selective laser [...] Read more.
One of the challenges of additive manufacturing (AM) technology is the inability to generate repeatable microstructure and mechanical properties in different orientations. In this work, the effect of build orientation on the microstructure and mechanical properties of Ti–6Al–4V specimens manufactured by selective laser melting (SLM) was studied. The samples built in the Z orientation showed weaker tensile strength compared to the samples built in X, and Y orientations. Samples built in X and Y orientations exhibited brittle fracture features in areas close to the substrate and ductile fracture features in the area farther from the substrate. Defects including pores, cracks, and unmelted/partially-melted powder particles contributed to lower tensile and fracture toughness properties in different orientations. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Selective Laser Melting: Materials and Applications)
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Open AccessArticle
Intra- and Inter-Repeatability of Profile Deviations of an AlSi10Mg Tooling Component Manufactured by Laser Powder Bed Fusion
J. Manuf. Mater. Process. 2018, 2(3), 56; https://doi.org/10.3390/jmmp2030056
Received: 13 July 2018 / Revised: 6 August 2018 / Accepted: 15 August 2018 / Published: 21 August 2018
Cited by 1 | PDF Full-text (11740 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Laser powder bed fusion (LPBF) is one of the most potent additive manufacturing (AM) processes. Metallic LPBF is gaining popularity, but one of the obstacles facing its larger industrial use is the limited knowledge of its dimensional and geometrical performances. This paper presents [...] Read more.
Laser powder bed fusion (LPBF) is one of the most potent additive manufacturing (AM) processes. Metallic LPBF is gaining popularity, but one of the obstacles facing its larger industrial use is the limited knowledge of its dimensional and geometrical performances. This paper presents a metrological investigation of the geometrical and dimensional deviations of a selected LPBF-manufactured component, according to the ASME Y14.5-2009 standard. This approach allows for an estimation of both the process capability, as per ISO 22514-4 standard, and the correlations between the part location in the manufacturing chamber and the profile deviations. Forty-nine parts, which are representative of a typical aerospace tooling component (30 mm in diameter and 27.2 mm in height) were manufactured from AlSi10Mg powder using an EOSINT M280 printer and subjected to a stress relief annealing at 300 °C for two hours. This manufacturing procedure was repeated three times. A complete statistical analysis was carried out and the results of the investigation show that LPBF performances for all geometrical variations of 147 identical parts fall within a range of 230 µm at a 99.73% level. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Selective Laser Melting: Materials and Applications)
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