Special Issue "Intelligence and Education"

A special issue of Journal of Intelligence (ISSN 2079-3200).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (31 March 2020).

Special Issue Editors

Prof. Dr. Paul De Boeck
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Psychology, Ohio State University, Columbus, OH 43210, USA
Faculty of Psychology and Educational Science, KU Leuven, Tiensestraat 102, B-3000 Leuven, Belgium
Interests: item response theory; mixed models; intelligence; personality; individual differences
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals
Prof. Dr. Kathleen Scalise
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Educational Methodology, Policy and Leadership, University of Oregon, Eugene, OR, USA
Interests: assessments in science and mathematics education

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

The history of intelligence research and measurement is closely linked with educational interests. For example, Spearman’s (1904) first article on general intelligence is in fact largely based on school grade data, and Binet’s initiatives to measure intelligence were inspired by educational concerns. Whereas intelligence and its measurement is still a topic in school psychology and educational psychology, it no longer seems of interest in the field of education. In the domain of educational measurement, the notion of ability is omnipresent, but the notion of intelligence is nearly absent. Yet measures of academic achievement can be highly correlated with some measures of intelligence, for a variety of reasons including possibly spurious relationships.

With this Special Issue we would like to discuss when and why intelligence has disappeared as a potentially interesting notion and how it is being replaced with other notions. Is intelligence considered an invalid notion, a useless notion, an irrelevant notion, a misleading notion? Still, the psychometric models and the process models used for educational measurement and intelligence are very similar, and both fields share the notion of ability. In a similar way, in the domain or learning and development, tasks are being used which are very similar to the tasks presented in intelligence tests.   

The motivation for the Special Issue is not to promote intelligence as a notion in education. Instead, we invite manuscripts explaining why the notion of intelligence is absent in the domain of education, for good reasons or for not so good reasons. What would be the risks and advantages of re-introducing the notion of intelligence, for the different levels of education (from basic school to college)? Can the field of educational measurement learn from intelligence measurement and vice versa? Some highly interesting developments in the field of education with links to intelligence are taking place, for example, in the context of the International Society for Mind, Brain, and Education. Is this development and related trends the future of intelligence related research in education?

Prof. Dr. Paul De Boeck
Prof. Dr. Kathleen Scalise
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Journal of Intelligence is an international peer-reviewed open access quarterly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1400 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

Article
Why Intelligence Is Missing from American Education Policy and Practice, and What Can Be Done About It
J. Intell. 2020, 8(1), 2; https://doi.org/10.3390/jintelligence8010002 - 03 Jan 2020
Cited by 10 | Viewed by 4619
Abstract
To understand why education as a field has not incorporated intelligence, we must consider the field’s history and culture. Accordingly, in this cross-disciplinary collaboration between a political scientist who studies institutions and a psychologist who studies intelligence, we outline how the roots of [...] Read more.
To understand why education as a field has not incorporated intelligence, we must consider the field’s history and culture. Accordingly, in this cross-disciplinary collaboration between a political scientist who studies institutions and a psychologist who studies intelligence, we outline how the roots of contemporary American Educational Leadership as a field determine its contemporary avoidance of the concept of intelligence. Rooted in early 20th century progressivism and scientific management, Educational Leadership theory envisions professionally run schools as “Taylorist” factories with teaching and leadership largely standardized, prioritizing compliance over cognitive ability among educators. Further, the roots of modern education theory do not see the intelligence of students as largely malleable. Hence, prioritizing intelligence is viewed as elitist. For more than a century, these assumptions have impacted recruitment into education as a profession. We conclude with ideas about how to bring intelligence into mainstream schooling, within the existing K-12 education institutional context. We believe that better integration of intelligence and broader individual differences research in education policy and practice would lead to more rapid advances to finding evidence based solutions to help children. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Intelligence and Education)
Article
Intelligence and the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act
J. Intell. 2019, 7(4), 24; https://doi.org/10.3390/jintelligence7040024 - 21 Nov 2019
Viewed by 3892
Abstract
One of the stated purposes of this Special Issue is to “discuss when and why intelligence has disappeared” in education. In this paper, I argue that intelligence is still heavily involved in public education in the United States due to the Individuals with [...] Read more.
One of the stated purposes of this Special Issue is to “discuss when and why intelligence has disappeared” in education. In this paper, I argue that intelligence is still heavily involved in public education in the United States due to the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act. Moreover, due to several factors, including high-profile court cases, intelligence tests are legally used in an inconsistent manner in special education decision-making throughout the U.S. These cases illustrate the complex issues surrounding the psychometric properties of intelligence tests, historical conflicts surrounding racial equity, differences in federal versus state policies, and methodological concerns surrounding special education policies are discussed. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Intelligence and Education)
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