Special Issue "Use of Fiber-Reinforced Polymer Composites in Civil Engineering"

A special issue of Journal of Composites Science (ISSN 2504-477X).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (30 September 2018)

Special Issue Editor

Guest Editor
Prof. Radhouane Masmoudi

Université de Sherbrooke, Sherbrooke, QC, Canada
Website | E-Mail
Interests: fiber-reinforced polymers (FRP); FRP-reinforced concrete structures; FRP testing; FRP utility applications; numerical modelling; thermal effects on FRP-reinforced concrete structures; high-performance hybrid FRP-concrete structural members

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Fiber-reinforced polymers (FRP) or advanced composite materials for concrete and masonry structures, were introduced as an alternative to conventional steel reinforcement, because of their high durability in harsh environmental conditions and their high strength-to-weight ratio. Thirty years ago, the world’s ageing concrete infrastructure compelled research to focus on providing economic solutions to extend the service life and upgrade the seismic and structural performance of concrete and masonry structures. While tremendous research achievements—in terms of testing and modelling the performance of FRP reinforcements for civil engineering applications—have been accomplished and led to the development of several codes and design guidelines worldwide, there is still an urgent need for experimental and analytical modelling under realistic environmental conditions, as well as accurate modelling of long-term performance.

This Special Issue of the Journal of Composites Science invites innovative contributions on the use of FRP reinforcements for concrete and masonry infrastructure. Topics include, but are not limited to, the following:

  • FRP reinforcements, innovative fibers, polymers and manufacturing processes
  • FRP internal reinforcements, FRP external reinforcement, FRP for pre- and post-tensioned applications
  • Concrete-filled FRP tubes/hybrid structural members using FRP and other materials
  • Structural behavior of FRP-reinforced concrete structures
  • Bond behavior of FRP reinforcements
  • Durability, long-term performance of FRP reinforcements
  • Extreme loads: fire, impact and blast loadings
  • Strengthening of concrete, steel, masonry and timber structures
  • Seismic retrofit of structures
  • Smart FRP structures/instrumentation
  • Life-cycle analysis
  • Field applications
  • Codes/design standards/design guidelines

Prof. Radhouane Masmoudi
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Journal of Composites Science is an international peer-reviewed open access quarterly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) is waived for well-prepared manuscripts submitted to this issue. Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • fiber-reinforced polymer (FRP) reinforcements
  • advanced composite materials
  • civil engineering
  • concrete, masonry infrastructure
  • innovative materials
  • field applications
  • life-cycle analysis of FRP-reinforced structures

Published Papers (3 papers)

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Research

Open AccessArticle
Axial Response of Concrete-Filled FRP Tube (CFFT) Columns with Internal Bars
J. Compos. Sci. 2018, 2(4), 57; https://doi.org/10.3390/jcs2040057
Received: 26 July 2018 / Revised: 31 August 2018 / Accepted: 5 September 2018 / Published: 24 September 2018
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Abstract
This paper aims at investigating the general axial behavior of long circular concrete-filled, fiber-reinforced polymer (FRP) tube (CFFT) columns internally reinforced with different longitudinal rebars. A total of seven CFFT and three reinforced concrete (RC) columns served as control specimens for comparisons and [...] Read more.
This paper aims at investigating the general axial behavior of long circular concrete-filled, fiber-reinforced polymer (FRP) tube (CFFT) columns internally reinforced with different longitudinal rebars. A total of seven CFFT and three reinforced concrete (RC) columns served as control specimens for comparisons and were constructed and tested under cyclic axial loading until failure. The test parameters were: (1) internal reinforcement type (steel, glass fiber-reinforced polymer (GFRP) or carbon fiber-reinforced polymer (CFRP)) and amount; (2) GFRP tube thicknesses; and (3) nature of loading. All columns had 1900-mm in height and 213-mm in diameter. Examination of the test results has led to a number of significant conclusions in regards to the trend and ultimate condition of the axial stress-strain behavior, mode of failure of tested CFFT columns, and plastic strains. As expected, an increase in the FRP tube thickness (or stiffness) resulted in an increase in the strength and strain enhancement ratios. The validity of the available design provisions for predicting the ultimate load-carrying capacity of tested columns is also highlighted. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Use of Fiber-Reinforced Polymer Composites in Civil Engineering)
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Open AccessArticle
An Experimental Investigation of FRCC Shear Walls Reinforced with Steel and GFRP Bars
J. Compos. Sci. 2018, 2(3), 55; https://doi.org/10.3390/jcs2030055
Received: 12 July 2018 / Revised: 9 August 2018 / Accepted: 5 September 2018 / Published: 10 September 2018
Cited by 1 | PDF Full-text (9605 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Contemporary structures can resist earthquakes as they deform and dissipate energy. However, during strong ground motions, these structures can sustain significant concrete damage and overall permanent deformations. Therefore, it is of great benefit if earthquake-resisting structures can deform and dissipate energy, and yet [...] Read more.
Contemporary structures can resist earthquakes as they deform and dissipate energy. However, during strong ground motions, these structures can sustain significant concrete damage and overall permanent deformations. Therefore, it is of great benefit if earthquake-resisting structures can deform and dissipate energy, and yet sustain mitigated damage. This paper illustrates the findings of an experimental study focused on the mitigation of damage and reduction of residual displacements in reinforced concrete (RC) shear walls. In this study, the cyclic properties of two innovative shear walls—a slender and a squat wall—which were cast with fiber-reinforced cementitious composites and reinforced with steel and glass fiber reinforced polymer bars are investigated. Then, the improvements of the innovative specimens with respect to two conventional RC shear walls are discussed in terms of damage propagation, self-centering, stiffness retention and energy dissipation. As the experiments showed, the innovative walls sustained mitigated concrete damage and less residual drift ratios while illustrating significant stiffness and energy dissipation capacities. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Use of Fiber-Reinforced Polymer Composites in Civil Engineering)
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Open AccessArticle
Design and Construction of CFRP Rod Panel Retrofit for Impacted RC Bridge Girders
J. Compos. Sci. 2018, 2(3), 40; https://doi.org/10.3390/jcs2030040
Received: 30 May 2018 / Revised: 29 June 2018 / Accepted: 10 July 2018 / Published: 11 July 2018
Cited by 1 | PDF Full-text (2176 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
CFRP Rod Panels (CRPs) have been recently developed to externally strengthening concrete structures in flexure, especially over multi-lane highways. Both exterior beams of a reinforced concrete (RC) bridge traversing southbound Interstate 71 (I-71) in Kentucky were damaged by an over-height truck impact. Rebars [...] Read more.
CFRP Rod Panels (CRPs) have been recently developed to externally strengthening concrete structures in flexure, especially over multi-lane highways. Both exterior beams of a reinforced concrete (RC) bridge traversing southbound Interstate 71 (I-71) in Kentucky were damaged by an over-height truck impact. Rebars within the bottom mat of each exterior beam were severely bent due to the impact. CRP 195, with CFRP rods 3.96-mm (0.156 in) in diameter, and having a capacity of 870 kN (195.6 kips) per 300 mm (12 in) width of panel, were selected for flexural strengthening. CRPs were chosen due to their modular construction capability permitting a smaller work crew to carry out the retrofit construction while requiring closure of only a single lane of traffic on I-71. As current codes do not address CRPs, the retrofit design was based on American Association of State Highway and Transportation Officials (AASHTO) guidelines for externally bonded FRP. A load rating of the impacted girders was carried out for the as-built, damaged, and retrofitted stages. This paper details the retrofit construction of the bridge girders, highlighting the advantages of the CRPs. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Use of Fiber-Reinforced Polymer Composites in Civil Engineering)
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