Special Issue "Metabolomic Analysis in Health and Disease"

A special issue of Journal of Clinical Medicine (ISSN 2077-0383). This special issue belongs to the section "Molecular Diagnostics".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 10 March 2021.

Special Issue Editor

Prof. Dr. Masahiro Sugimoto
Website
Guest Editor
Research and Development Center for Minimally Invasive Therapies, Institute of Medical Science, Tokyo Medical University, 6-1-1 Shinjuku, Shinjuku-ku, Tokyo, 160-8402, Japan
Interests: bioinformatics; metabolomics

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Metabolomics, one of the established omics technologies, has been utilized to understand the metabolic pathways in various cells. This method enables us to evaluate systemic health status and metabolic diseases through high-dimensional metabolomics data.

This Special Issue aims to provide an update regarding the current topics in metabolomics related to health and diseases. Therefore, we would like to invite original research, state-of-the-art reviews, and viewpoints. In particular, we would like to encourage the submission of manuscripts covering biomarker discovery, mechanism elucidation, technology development, and data analysis.

We look forward to your submissions!

Prof. Dr. Masahiro Sugimoto
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Journal of Clinical Medicine is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2200 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • metabolomics
  • metabolites
  • chromatography
  • mass spectrometry
  • data processing
  • health
  • diseases
  • biomarkers

Published Papers (3 papers)

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Research

Open AccessArticle
Positive Effects of Saliva on Oral Candidiasis: Basic Research on the Analysis of Salivary Properties
J. Clin. Med. 2021, 10(4), 812; https://doi.org/10.3390/jcm10040812 - 17 Feb 2021
Abstract
The major causes of oral candidiasis include decreased salivary flow rate and the use of ill-fitting dentures. However, the relationships among prosthetic treatment, saliva, and Candida albicans have not been elucidated. This study aimed to examine the effects of prosthetic treatment and changes [...] Read more.
The major causes of oral candidiasis include decreased salivary flow rate and the use of ill-fitting dentures. However, the relationships among prosthetic treatment, saliva, and Candida albicans have not been elucidated. This study aimed to examine the effects of prosthetic treatment and changes in saliva (mainly the salivary flow rate) on oral candidiasis symptoms. Participants requiring prosthetic treatment underwent testing for C. albicans, salivary flow rate, intraoral symptoms, and bite force at the initial visit and four months after treatment to evaluate pretreatment and post-treatment changes. The relationships among C. albicans, salivary flow rate, dentures, and intraoral symptoms were analyzed using multiple regression analysis. Denture treatment improved activity against C. albicans as well as the salivary flow rate, intraoral symptoms, and masticatory function. Multiple regression analysis revealed that changes in the stimulated salivary flow rate due to prosthetic treatment significantly improved C. albicans detection (p = 0.011), intraoral symptoms (p = 0.037), and bite force (p = 0.031). This study showed that prosthetic treatment improved salivary flow and intraoral symptoms and confirmed the influence of stimulated salivary flow rate changes. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Metabolomic Analysis in Health and Disease)
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Open AccessArticle
Relationship between Standard Uptake Values of Positron Emission Tomography/Computed Tomography and Salivary Metabolites in Oral Cancer: A Pilot Study
J. Clin. Med. 2020, 9(12), 3958; https://doi.org/10.3390/jcm9123958 - 07 Dec 2020
Abstract
18F-fluorodeoxyglucose (18F-FDG) positron emission tomography (PET)/computed tomography (CT) is usually used for staging or evaluation of treatment response rather than for cancer screening. However, 18F-FDG PET/CT has also been used in Japan for cancer screening in people with no [...] Read more.
18F-fluorodeoxyglucose (18F-FDG) positron emission tomography (PET)/computed tomography (CT) is usually used for staging or evaluation of treatment response rather than for cancer screening. However, 18F-FDG PET/CT has also been used in Japan for cancer screening in people with no cancer symptoms, and accumulating evidence supports this application of 18F-FDG PET/CT. Previously, we have observed a correlation between the saliva and tumor metabolomic profiles in patients with oral cancer. Hence, if salivary metabolites demonstrate a significant correlation with PET parameters such as the maximum standardized uptake value (SUVmax), they may have the potential to be used as a screening tool before PET/CT to identify patients with high SUVmax. Hence, in this study, we aimed to explore the relationship between salivary metabolites and SUVmax of 18F-FDG PET/CT using previously collected data. 18F-FDG PET/CT was performed for staging 26 patients with oral cancer. The collected data were integrated and analyzed along with quantified salivary hydrophilic metabolites obtained from the same patients with oral cancer and controls (n = 44). In total, 11 metabolites showed significant correlations with SUVmax in the delayed phases. A multiple logistic regression model of the two metabolites showed the ability to discriminate between patients with oral cancer and controls, with an area under the receiver operating characteristic curve of 0.738 (p = 0.001). This study uniquely confirmed a relationship between salivary metabolites and SUVmax of PET/CT in patients with oral cancer; salivary metabolites were significantly correlated with SUVmax. These salivary metabolites can be used as a screening tool before PET/CT to identify patients with high SUVmax, i.e., to detect the presence of oral cancer. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Metabolomic Analysis in Health and Disease)
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Open AccessArticle
Serum Metabolomic Profiling of Patients with Non-Infectious Uveitis
J. Clin. Med. 2020, 9(12), 3955; https://doi.org/10.3390/jcm9123955 - 06 Dec 2020
Abstract
The activities of various metabolic pathways can influence the pathogeneses of autoimmune diseases, and intrinsic metabolites can potentially be used to diagnose diseases. However, the metabolomic analysis of patients with uveitis has not yet been conducted. Here, we profiled the serum metabolomes of [...] Read more.
The activities of various metabolic pathways can influence the pathogeneses of autoimmune diseases, and intrinsic metabolites can potentially be used to diagnose diseases. However, the metabolomic analysis of patients with uveitis has not yet been conducted. Here, we profiled the serum metabolomes of patients with three major forms of uveitis (Behҫet’s disease (BD), sarcoidosis, and Vogt-Koyanagi-Harada disease (VKH)) to identify potential biomarkers. This study included 19 BD, 20 sarcoidosis, and 15 VKH patients alongside 16 healthy control subjects. The metabolite concentrations in their sera were quantified using liquid chromatography with time-of-flight mass spectrometry. The discriminative abilities of quantified metabolites were evaluated by four comparisons: control vs. three diseases, and each disease vs. the other two diseases (such as sarcoidosis vs. BD + VKH). Among 78 quantified metabolites, 24 kinds of metabolites showed significant differences in these comparisons. Four multiple logistic regression models were developed and validated. The area under the receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve (AUC) in the model to discriminate disease groups from control was 0.72. The AUC of the other models to discriminate sarcoidosis, BD, and VKH from the other two diseases were 0.84, 0.83, and 0.73, respectively. This study provides potential diagnostic abilities of sarcoidosis, BD, and VKH using routinely available serum samples that can be collected with minimal invasiveness. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Metabolomic Analysis in Health and Disease)
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