Hair and Scalp Diseases

A special issue of Journal of Clinical Medicine (ISSN 2077-0383). This special issue belongs to the section "Dermatology".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (15 April 2022) | Viewed by 13600

Special Issue Editor


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Guest Editor
Department of Dermatology, Medical University of Warsaw, Warsaw, Poland
Interests: autoimmunity; clinical dermatology; melanoma; skin; autoimmune disease; dermatology; hair diseases; trichoscopy
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Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues, 

Hair and scalp diseases are a rapidly growing field of basic and clinical research. There is an increased understanding of the hair as an important factor determining the quality of life. New diagnostic techniques, such as trichoscopy or reflectance confocal microscopy and novel therapeutic methods, such JAK inhibitors and biological drugs contribute to the field of hair and scalp diseases being a topic of significant interest in dermatology and in medicine in general. This issue will focus on the systemic aspects of hair and scalp diseases, novel diagnostic techniques and new developments in treatment.

Prof. Dr. Lidia Rudnicka
Guest Editor

Keywords

  • trichoscopy
  • alopecia areata
  • androgenetic alopecia
  • frontal fibrosing alopecia
  • lichen planopilaris

Published Papers (4 papers)

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Research

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9 pages, 1433 KiB  
Article
Frontal Fibrosing Alopecia: A Histopathological Comparison of the Frontal Hairline with Normal-Appearing Scalp
by María Librada Porriño-Bustamante, Fernando Javier Pinedo-Moraleda, Ángel Fernández-Flores, Trinidad Montero-Vílchez, María Antonia Fernández-Pugnaire and Salvador Arias-Santiago
J. Clin. Med. 2022, 11(14), 4121; https://doi.org/10.3390/jcm11144121 - 15 Jul 2022
Cited by 3 | Viewed by 1947
Abstract
Frontal fibrosing alopecia is characterized by the presence of a lymphocytic inflammatory infiltrate around the upper follicle and by perifollicular fibrosis, which results in the destruction of the hair follicle. Recent reports have also found the presence of those findings in clinically unaffected [...] Read more.
Frontal fibrosing alopecia is characterized by the presence of a lymphocytic inflammatory infiltrate around the upper follicle and by perifollicular fibrosis, which results in the destruction of the hair follicle. Recent reports have also found the presence of those findings in clinically unaffected areas. The aim of this report is to perform a deeper analysis of the histopathological features of this apparently unaffected scalp. A cross-sectional study including 52 women with frontal fibrosing alopecia was performed. Two areas were biopsied: the frontal hairline and a normal-appearing scalp area. Sebaceous glands were reduced/absent in 80.8% of the frontal hairline samples compared to 42.3% of the “healthy scalp” samples (p = 0.001). Inflammatory infiltrate was observed in 92.3% of patients in the frontal hairline and in 86.5% of them in the “healthy scalp” area (p = 0.508), although the severity was higher in the former (p = 0.013). Follicular epithelium changes were seen in 70.6% of the frontal hairline biopsies compared to 48.1% of the “healthy scalp” biopsies (p = 0.012). Fibrous tissular changes were noted in 80.8% and 53.8% of the frontal hairline and “healthy scalp” biopsies, respectively (p = 0.003). In conclusion, the histopathological features of frontal fibrosing alopecia are shared by both affected and clinically unaffected areas. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Hair and Scalp Diseases)
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10 pages, 1728 KiB  
Article
Alopecia Areata and Dexamethasone Mini-Pulse Therapy, A Prospective Cohort: Real World Evidence and Factors Related to Successful Response
by Manuel Sánchez-Díaz, Trinidad Montero-Vilchez, Ahinoa Bueno-Rodriguez, Alejandro Molina-Leyva and Salvador Arias-Santiago
J. Clin. Med. 2022, 11(6), 1694; https://doi.org/10.3390/jcm11061694 - 18 Mar 2022
Cited by 9 | Viewed by 4987
Abstract
The mini-pulse oral corticosteroids treatment for alopecia areata (AA) is an accessible treatment whose efficacy and adverse effects have not yet been properly described. The objective of the study was to assess the effectiveness and safety of the mini-pulse oral corticosteroids treatment in [...] Read more.
The mini-pulse oral corticosteroids treatment for alopecia areata (AA) is an accessible treatment whose efficacy and adverse effects have not yet been properly described. The objective of the study was to assess the effectiveness and safety of the mini-pulse oral corticosteroids treatment in patients with AA, and to explore potential factors associated to the response in a real-world setting. An observational study of a prospective cohort to assess the effectiveness and safety of a mini-pulse dexamethasone treatment in patients with AA, who failed to improve with topical therapies, was performed. A SALT II score and other clinical and safety variables were recorded at baseline, 3, 6, 9, and 12 months. An overall significant and progressive decrease of the SALT score was found during treatment: SALT-50 response was achieved after 9 months in 51.8% of the patients. Hypothyroidism and early age of onset were predictors of the lack of response to treatment. The treatment combination with oral minoxidil showed no effect on the SALT score reduction. Dexamethasone daily and cumulative dose were associated with a higher percentage of side effects. To conclude, the mini-pulse oral corticosteroids treatment is an effective treatment for AA, although patients with an early onset of the disease and hypothyroidism may not benefit. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Hair and Scalp Diseases)
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10 pages, 596 KiB  
Article
Chemokine C-C Motif Ligand 7 (CCL7), a Biomarker of Atherosclerosis, Is Associated with the Severity of Alopecia Areata: A Preliminary Study
by Anna Waśkiel-Burnat, Anna Niemczyk, Leszek Blicharz, Paulina Chmielińska, Michał Zaremba, Aleksandra Gąsecka, Krzysztof J. Filipiak, Małgorzata Olszewska and Lidia Rudnicka
J. Clin. Med. 2021, 10(22), 5418; https://doi.org/10.3390/jcm10225418 - 19 Nov 2021
Cited by 5 | Viewed by 1997
Abstract
Alopecia areata is an autoimmune, inflammatory form of non-scarring hair loss that may affect any hair-bearing area. Recently, an increased risk of cardiovascular disorders has been described in patients with alopecia areata. The aim of the study was to evaluate the serum concentrations [...] Read more.
Alopecia areata is an autoimmune, inflammatory form of non-scarring hair loss that may affect any hair-bearing area. Recently, an increased risk of cardiovascular disorders has been described in patients with alopecia areata. The aim of the study was to evaluate the serum concentrations of proinflammatory proteins associated with atherosclerosis (chemokine C-C motif ligand 4; CCL4, chemokine C-C motif ligand 7, CCL7; and sortilin, SORT1), and cardiovascular risk (myeloperoxidase, MPO; interleukin 1 receptor-like 1, IL1RL1; and growth differentiation factor 15, GDF15) in patients with alopecia areata without symptoms or prior cardiovascular disease in comparison with healthy controls. Sixty otherwise healthy patients with alopecia areata and twenty control subjects matched for age, gender, and body mass index (BMI) were enrolled in the study. No significant differences in the serum levels of MPO, IL1RL1, CCL4, CCL7, SORT1, and GDF15 were detected between patients with alopecia areata and healthy controls. A positive correlation was found between the serum concentration of CCL7 and the severity of alopecia areata (r = 0.281, p = 0.03), while GDF15 correlated with age at the disease onset (r = 0.509, p < 0.0001). The results of the present study suggest that the severity of alopecia areata may be associated with an increased risk of atherosclerosis. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Hair and Scalp Diseases)
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Review

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12 pages, 561 KiB  
Review
Therapeutic and Reconstructive Management Options in Scleroderma (Morphea) en Coup de Sabre in Children and Adults. A Systematic Literature Review
by Ewelina Ulc, Lidia Rudnicka, Anna Waśkiel-Burnat, Olga Warszawik-Hendzel, Anna Niemczyk and Małgorzata Olszewska
J. Clin. Med. 2021, 10(19), 4517; https://doi.org/10.3390/jcm10194517 - 29 Sep 2021
Cited by 9 | Viewed by 3584
Abstract
Scleroderma (morphea) en coup de sabre is a localized subtype restricted to the frontoparietal region of the head. Current treatment paradigms rely on low levels of evidence, primarily case reports and case series-supported by expert opinions. The aim of this article was to [...] Read more.
Scleroderma (morphea) en coup de sabre is a localized subtype restricted to the frontoparietal region of the head. Current treatment paradigms rely on low levels of evidence, primarily case reports and case series-supported by expert opinions. The aim of this article was to systematically analyze current data related to the treatment of localized scleroderma en coup de sabre. The databases Scopus, PubMed, and EBSCO were searched for all reports discussing the treatment of localized scleroderma en coup de sabre. The keywords en coup de sabre, “facial linear scleroderma”, and “morphea linearis”, combined with “treatment” or “therapy” were used as search terms. A total of 34 articles analyzed treatment outcomes for patients with localized scleroderma en coup de sabre including 4 retrospective cohort studies, 2 prospective cohort studies, 4 case series, and 24 case reports, representing a total of 69 patients (38 children and 31 adults). Methotrexate was the most commonly investigated treatment (26 patients) with a highest response rate (26/26, 100%). Other treatments included systemic glucocorticosteroids (nine patients), followed by UVA1 (four patients), mycophenolate mofetil (two patients), hydroxychloroquine (five patients), abatacept (two patients), tocilizumab (three patients), cyclosporine (one patient), interferon gamma (one patient), PUVA therapy (two patients), NB-UVB therapy (one patient), and pulsed dye laser (one patient). Reconstructive and surgery treatment was successfully used for lesions with settled disease activity to improve the cosmetic aspect of the lesions. Conclusion: methotrexate is the most often-studied treatment and reported good clinical outcomes in children and adults with localized scleroderma en coup de sabre. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Hair and Scalp Diseases)
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