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Special Issue "Biomaterials and Implants in Development Osteointegration"

A special issue of Journal of Clinical Medicine (ISSN 2077-0383). This special issue belongs to the section "Stomatology".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 December 2019

Special Issue Editor

Guest Editor
Prof. Dr. José Luis Calvo Guirado

Full Professor of Oral Surgery and Implant Dentistry. International Dentistry Research Cathedra, Faculty of Health Sciences, Universidad Católica San Antonio de Murcia (UCAM), Murcia, Spain
Website | E-Mail
Phone: +34-670785208
Interests: dental implants; biomedical engineering; orthopedic materials; synthesis and testing of biomaterials; bioceramics

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

This issue will focus on the various conventional features of dental implants made in titanium, zirconia or titanium-zirconia implants. This clinical issue considered to describe new treatments in Trauma, Orthopedics and also in Dentistry considered and the influence of their physical properties on treatment outcomes in different kinds of patients.

Dental implant and new development of biomaterials can beneficial in some cases treatment possibilities are limited as a result of individual patients’ physical characteristics – bone density, bone quality or bone height.

Investigations comparing trauma implants and dental implants with new surfaces will occupy cortical bone, reduce crestal bone resorption and reduce micromotion compared with regular implants placed in trabecular and cortical bone and also in fractured patients.

This issue will assess how certain implant features (biomaterials, cells, surfaces,implants design, etc.) can influence in the treatment outcomes among completely edentulous patients rehabilitated with implant-supported fixed prostheses and orthopedic patients with complicated fractures. In this context, the research published in this issue will consider the impact of surgical and prosthetic type on patients’ quality of life and satisfaction with their oral health and orthopedic status.

It is my pleasure to invite you to submit a manuscript for this Special Issue. Full papers, communications, and reviews are all welcome.

Prof. Dr. José Luis Calvo Guirado
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Journal of Clinical Medicine is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1800 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Biomaterials
  • Dental implants and surfaces
  • Implant design
  • Orthopedic materials
  • Orthopedic screws

Published Papers (1 paper)

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Research

Open AccessArticle
Can the Macrogeometry of Dental Implants Influence Guided Bone Regeneration in Buccal Bone Defects? Histomorphometric and Biomechanical Analysis in Beagle Dogs
J. Clin. Med. 2019, 8(5), 618; https://doi.org/10.3390/jcm8050618
Received: 7 April 2019 / Revised: 5 May 2019 / Accepted: 5 May 2019 / Published: 7 May 2019
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Abstract
The aim of this experimental animal study was to assess guided bone regeneration (GBR) and implant stability (ISQ) around two dental implants with different macrogeometries. Forty eight dental implants were placed within six Beagle dogs. The implants were divided into two groups ( [...] Read more.
The aim of this experimental animal study was to assess guided bone regeneration (GBR) and implant stability (ISQ) around two dental implants with different macrogeometries. Forty eight dental implants were placed within six Beagle dogs. The implants were divided into two groups (n = 24 per group): G1 group implants presented semi-conical macrogeometry, a low apical self-tapping portion, and an external hexagonal connection (whereby the cervical portion was bigger than the implant body). G2 group implants presented parallel walls macrogeometry, a strong apical self-tapping portion, and an external hexagonal connection (with the cervical portion parallel to the implant body). Buccal (mouth-related) defects of 2 mm (c2 condition) and 5 mm (c3 condition) were created. For the control condition with no defect (c1), implants were installed at crestal bone level. Eight implants in each group were installed under each condition. The implant stability quotient (ISQ) was measured immediately after implant placement, and on the day of sacrifice (3 months after the implant placement). Histological and histomorphometric procedures and analysis were performed to assess all samples, measuring crestal bone loss (CBL) and bone-to-implant contact (BIC). The data obtained were compared with statistical significance set at p < 0.05. The ISQ results showed a similar evolution between the groups at the two evaluation times, although higher values were found in the G1 group under all conditions. Within the limitations of this animal study, it may be concluded that implant macrogeometry is an important factor influencing guided bone regeneration in buccal defects. Group G1 showed better buccal bone regeneration (CBL) and BIC % at 3 months follow up, also parallel collar design can stimulate bone regeneration more than divergent collar design implants. The apical portion of the implant, with a stronger self-tapping feature, may provide better initial stability, even in the presence of a bone defect in the buccal area. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Biomaterials and Implants in Development Osteointegration)
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