Special Issue "Invasive Arthropod Pests"

A special issue of Insects (ISSN 2075-4450).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 July 2020.

Special Issue Editors

Prof. Jose Carlos Verle Rodrigues
Website
Guest Editor
University of Puerto Rico, Center for Excellence in Quarantine & Invasive Species, 1193 Calle Guayacan, San Juan PR, 00926 Puerto Rico, USA
Interests: invasive species; arthropod invasion; quarantine; virus-vector interactions; acari; molecular diagnostics
Dr. Todd M. Gilligan
Website
Guest Editor
USDA-APHIS-PPQ-Science & Technology (S&T), 2301 Research Boulevard, Suite 108, Fort Collins, Colorado 80526, USA
Interests: diagnostics; invasive species; systematics; Lepidoptera; Helicoverpa; Tortricidae

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Invasive arthropod pests are a major threat to food production and environmental sustainability globally. The purpose of this issue is to invite authors to present proactive and innovative approaches to confronting invasive arthropod pests. We need to establish global scientific expertise to enable methods development and integration of efforts in order to mitigate the negative impacts associated with an increasing number of invasions. Identification of the main pest pathways, climatic challenges, and key regional pests of concern is crucial and will help to reduce the likelihood of moving these invasive pests across the globe. Areas of priority that require action include the development of integrated national, regional, and global policies and strategies, specific action plans to deal with present and future invasions, a framework for information exchange, and capacity building in infrastructure, scientific knowledge, skills and expertise. The increasing awareness and application of advanced technology in agriculture and natural environments, such as  automated sensors, artificial intelligence and machine learning, the Internet of Things (IoT), robotics and automation, big data generation and analysis, and High-throughput Screening (HTS) systems,  is essential to coordinating efforts to limit damage caused by invasive species worldwide. This Special Issue will address pests that impact major commodities, specialty crops, and natural landscapes.  The primary purpose of this initiative is to create a forum to enhance the discussion of integrated, strategic, and front-line approaches to key invasive arthropod pests.

Prof. Jose Carlos Verle Rodrigues
Dr. Todd M. Gilligan
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Insects is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1400 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Lepidoptera
  • Coleoptera
  • modeling insects invasion
  • prevention and preparedness
  • control strategies for invasive insects
  • biomolecular tools and tracking arthropods invasion

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

Open AccessArticle
Influence of Temperature on Age-Stage, Two-Sex Life Tables for a Minnesota-Acclimated Population of the Brown Marmorated Stink Bug (Halyomorpha halys)
Insects 2020, 11(2), 108; https://doi.org/10.3390/insects11020108 - 07 Feb 2020
Abstract
Temperature is a critical single factor influencing insect population dynamics, and is foundational for improving our understanding of the phenology of invasive species adapting to new agroecosystems or in the process of range expansion. An age-stage, two-sex life table was therefore developed to [...] Read more.
Temperature is a critical single factor influencing insect population dynamics, and is foundational for improving our understanding of the phenology of invasive species adapting to new agroecosystems or in the process of range expansion. An age-stage, two-sex life table was therefore developed to analyze fundamental demographic features such as development, survival, and reproduction of a Minnesota-acclimated population of the invasive brown marmorated stink bug (Halyomorpha halys), in the north central USA. All salient life history parameters were estimated to better understand the population growth potential of H. halys at the current limit of its northern range in North America. We examined the effect of selected constant temperatures on immature development and survival (15–39 °C), adult reproduction and longevity (17–36 °C) of H. halys in the laboratory. The Minnesota population developed faster and survived at higher rates relative to a population that had previously established in Pennsylvania, USA. Mean generation time for the Minnesota population was minimized at 30 °C, while survival and fecundity were maximized at 27 and 23 °C, respectively. Given these findings, we assessed the effect of temperature on the intrinsic rate of increase ( r m ), the life table parameter that integrates the effects of temperature on development, survival, and reproduction. A Ratkowsky model predicted r m was maximized (0.0899) at 27.5 °C. We discuss the implications of our findings for understanding population growth rates for H. halys in the context of a warming climate, and potential to emerge as a serious crop pest in the Midwest U.S. region. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Invasive Arthropod Pests)
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Open AccessArticle
Influence of Temperature on the Interaction for Resource Utilization between Fall Armyworm, Spodoptera frugiperda (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae), and a Community of Lepidopteran Maize Stemborers Larvae
Insects 2020, 11(2), 73; https://doi.org/10.3390/insects11020073 - 21 Jan 2020
Abstract
Intra- and interspecific interactions within communities of species that utilize the same resources are characterized by competition or facilitation. The noctuid stemborers, Busseola fusca and Sesamia calamistis, and the crambid stemborer, Chilo partellus were the most important pests of maize in sub-Saharan [...] Read more.
Intra- and interspecific interactions within communities of species that utilize the same resources are characterized by competition or facilitation. The noctuid stemborers, Busseola fusca and Sesamia calamistis, and the crambid stemborer, Chilo partellus were the most important pests of maize in sub-Saharan Africa before the recent “invasion” of fall armyworm (FAW), Spodoptera frugiperda, which currently seriously limits maize yields in Africa. This new pest is interacting with the stemborer community at the larval stage in the use of maize resources. From previous works on the influence of temperature on the larval intra- and interspecific resources utilization within the community of Lepidoptera stemborers involving B. fusca, S. calamistis, and C. partellus, there is a need to update these studies by adding the new pest, S. frugiperda, in order to understand the effect of temperature on the larval interactions of all these four species under the context of climate change. The influence of temperature on intra- and interspecific larval interactions was studied using artificial stems kept at different constant temperatures (15 °C, 20 °C, 25 °C, and 30 °C) in an incubator and assessing survival and relative growth rates of each species in single and multi-species experiments. After the inclusion of FAW into the experiments, with regard to relative growth rates, both intra- and interspecific competition was observed among all four species. With regard to survival rates, cannibalism can also explain the intra- and interspecific interactions observed among all four species. Interspecific competition was stronger between the stemborers than between the FAW and the stemborers. Similar to lepidopteran stemborers, temperature affected both survival and relative growth rates of the FAW as well. Regardless of the temperature, C. partellus was superior in interspecific interactions shown by higher relative growth and survival rates. The results suggest that the FAW will co-exist with stemborer species along entire temperature gradient, though competition and/or cannibalism with them is weak. In addition, temperature increases caused by climate change is likely to confer an advantage to C. partellus over the fall armyworm and the other noctuids. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Invasive Arthropod Pests)
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