Special Issue "Invasive Arthropod Pests"

A special issue of Insects (ISSN 2075-4450).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (31 October 2020).

Special Issue Editors

Prof. Jose Carlos Verle Rodrigues
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
University of Puerto Rico, Center for Excellence in Quarantine & Invasive Species, 1193 Calle Guayacan, San Juan PR, 00926 Puerto Rico, USA
Interests: invasive species; arthropod invasion; quarantine; virus-vector interactions; acari; molecular diagnostics
Dr. Todd M. Gilligan
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
USDA-APHIS-PPQ-Science & Technology (S&T), 2301 Research Boulevard, Suite 108, Fort Collins, Colorado 80526, USA
Interests: diagnostics; invasive species; systematics; Lepidoptera; Helicoverpa; Tortricidae

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Invasive arthropod pests are a major threat to food production and environmental sustainability globally. The purpose of this issue is to invite authors to present proactive and innovative approaches to confronting invasive arthropod pests. We need to establish global scientific expertise to enable methods development and integration of efforts in order to mitigate the negative impacts associated with an increasing number of invasions. Identification of the main pest pathways, climatic challenges, and key regional pests of concern is crucial and will help to reduce the likelihood of moving these invasive pests across the globe. Areas of priority that require action include the development of integrated national, regional, and global policies and strategies, specific action plans to deal with present and future invasions, a framework for information exchange, and capacity building in infrastructure, scientific knowledge, skills and expertise. The increasing awareness and application of advanced technology in agriculture and natural environments, such as  automated sensors, artificial intelligence and machine learning, the Internet of Things (IoT), robotics and automation, big data generation and analysis, and High-throughput Screening (HTS) systems,  is essential to coordinating efforts to limit damage caused by invasive species worldwide. This Special Issue will address pests that impact major commodities, specialty crops, and natural landscapes.  The primary purpose of this initiative is to create a forum to enhance the discussion of integrated, strategic, and front-line approaches to key invasive arthropod pests.

Prof. Jose Carlos Verle Rodrigues
Dr. Todd M. Gilligan
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

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Keywords

  • Lepidoptera
  • Coleoptera
  • modeling insects invasion
  • prevention and preparedness
  • control strategies for invasive insects
  • biomolecular tools and tracking arthropods invasion

Published Papers (10 papers)

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Research

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Open AccessCommunication
Invasive Agricultural Pest Drosophila suzukii (Diptera, Drosophilidae) Appeared in the Russian Caucasus
Insects 2020, 11(11), 826; https://doi.org/10.3390/insects11110826 - 23 Nov 2020
Viewed by 1043
Abstract
Spotted-wing drosophila Drosophila suzukii (Matsumura) is one of the most important invasive pests of fruit and wine production worldwide. This species feeds on Prunus spp., Rubus spp., Fragaria spp. (Rosaceae), Vaccinium spp. (Ericaceae), Vitis spp. (Vitaceae), and other soft fruits. It causes significant [...] Read more.
Spotted-wing drosophila Drosophila suzukii (Matsumura) is one of the most important invasive pests of fruit and wine production worldwide. This species feeds on Prunus spp., Rubus spp., Fragaria spp. (Rosaceae), Vaccinium spp. (Ericaceae), Vitis spp. (Vitaceae), and other soft fruits. It causes significant damage because, unlike most other Drosophila species, it oviposits and feeds on healthy fruits. Drosophila suzukii is a quarantine pest that is included on the European and Mediterranean Plant Protection Organization (EPPO) A2 List. This species is native to East Asia and has been rapidly spreading through Europe since 2008. Herein, we report the first records of D. suzukii in European Russia. In 2017 and 2020, we placed baited traps in different districts of the resort city of Sochi (Black sea Coast of the Caucasus, Krasnodar Territory, Russia). Three specimens of D. suzukii were collected in June 2017, two specimens in September 2017, and 44 specimens in September 2020. Specimens were identified by the typical female ovipositor, spotted wings of the males, and other morphological characters. Krasnodar Territory is one of the main fruit-producing regions of Russia. Therefore, populations of this pest should be monitored and measures to minimize economic damage should be taken. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Invasive Arthropod Pests)
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Open AccessArticle
Tracking Red Palm Mite Damage in the Western Hemisphere Invasion with Landsat Remote Sensing Data
Insects 2020, 11(9), 627; https://doi.org/10.3390/insects11090627 - 11 Sep 2020
Viewed by 12161
Abstract
Red palm mites (Raoiella indica Hirst, Acari: Tenuipalpidae) were first observed in the western hemisphere on the islands and countries surrounding the Caribbean Sea, infesting the coconut palm (Cocos nucifera L.). Detection of invasive pests usually relies upon changes in vegetation [...] Read more.
Red palm mites (Raoiella indica Hirst, Acari: Tenuipalpidae) were first observed in the western hemisphere on the islands and countries surrounding the Caribbean Sea, infesting the coconut palm (Cocos nucifera L.). Detection of invasive pests usually relies upon changes in vegetation properties as result of the pest activity. These changes may be visible in time series of satellite data records, such as Landsat satellites, which have been available with a 16-day repeat cycle at a spatial resolution of 30 m since 1982. Typical red palm mite infestations result in the yellowing of the lower leaves of the palm crown; remote sensing model simulations have indicated that this feature may be better detected using the green normalized difference vegetation index (GNDVI). Using the Google Earth Engine programming environment, a time series of Landsat 5 Thematic Mapper, Landsat 7 Enhanced Thematic Mapper Plus and Landsat 8 Operational Land Imager data was generated for plantations in northern and northeast Brazil, El Salvador, and Trinidad-Tobago. Considering the available studied plantations, there were little or no differences of GNDVI before and after the dates when red palm mites were first revealed at each location. A discussion of possible alternative approaches are discussed related to the limitations of the current satellite platforms. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Invasive Arthropod Pests)
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Open AccessArticle
Immigrant Tortricidae: Holarctic versus Introduced Species in North America
Insects 2020, 11(9), 594; https://doi.org/10.3390/insects11090594 - 03 Sep 2020
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 815
Abstract
In support of a comprehensive update to the checklist of the moths of North America, we attempt to determine the status of 151 species of Tortricidae present in North America that may be Holarctic, introduced, or sibling species of their European counterparts. Discovering [...] Read more.
In support of a comprehensive update to the checklist of the moths of North America, we attempt to determine the status of 151 species of Tortricidae present in North America that may be Holarctic, introduced, or sibling species of their European counterparts. Discovering the natural distributions of these taxa is often difficult, if not impossible, but several criteria can be applied to determine if a species that is present in both Europe and North America is natively Holarctic, introduced, or represented by different but closely related species on each continent. We use DNA barcodes (when available), morphology, host plants, and historical records (literature and museum specimens) to make these assessments and propose several taxonomic changes, as well as future areas of research. The following taxa are raised from synonymy to species status: Acleris ferrumixtana (Benander, 1934), stat. rev.; Acleris viburnana (Clemens, 1860), stat. rev.; Acleris pulverosana (Walker, 1863), stat. rev.; Acleris placidana (Robinson, 1869), stat. rev.; Lobesia spiraeae (McDunnough, 1938), stat. rev.; and Epiblema arctica Miller, 1985, stat. rev. Cydia saltitans (Westwood, 1858), stat. rev., is determined to be the valid name for the “jumping bean moth,” and Phiaris glaciana (Möschler, 1860), comb. n., is placed in a new genus. We determine that the number of Holarctic species has been overestimated by at least 20% in the past, and that the overall number of introduced species in North America is unexpectedly high, with Tortricidae accounting for approximately 23–30% of the total number of Lepidoptera species introduced to North America. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Invasive Arthropod Pests)
Open AccessArticle
Current Distribution and Diagnostic Features of Two Potentially Invasive Asian Buprestid Species: Agrilus mali Matsumura and A. fleischeri Obenberger (Coleoptera: Buprestidae)
Insects 2020, 11(8), 493; https://doi.org/10.3390/insects11080493 - 02 Aug 2020
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 656
Abstract
Our goal is to analyze the known geographical ranges and diagnostic features of two potentially invasive Asian buprestid species: the quarantine apple tree pest, Agrilus mali Matsumura, and the poplar pest A. fleischeri Obenberger. Based on the examination of museum collections and literature [...] Read more.
Our goal is to analyze the known geographical ranges and diagnostic features of two potentially invasive Asian buprestid species: the quarantine apple tree pest, Agrilus mali Matsumura, and the poplar pest A. fleischeri Obenberger. Based on the examination of museum collections and literature sources, we compiled comprehensive databases of records of the exact collecting sites for both species and generated detailed maps of their ranges. There are 51 documented localities for A. mali in the Russian Far East and East Siberia, Mongolia, China, and the Korean peninsula, and there are 53 documented localities for A. fleischeri in the Far East and Siberia, Kazakhstan, Mongolia, China, and Japan. No evidence of the presence of A. mali in Japan was found. Outbreak sites of A. mali in Xinjiang in the 2000s most likely represent the newly forming invasion areas; their proximity to the wild apple stands in the Kazakh part of the Tien Shan is a direct threat to Kazakhstan and adjacent countries. Sites damaged by A. fleischeri in Liaoning are situated within its native range; the outbreaks were likely triggered by the switch from indigenous to introduced poplars. This situation is similar to the early stages of emerald ash borer (Agrilus planipennis Fairmaire) invasion. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Invasive Arthropod Pests)
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Open AccessArticle
Comparative Toxicity of Helicoverpa armigera and Helicoverpa zea (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae) to Selected Insecticides
Insects 2020, 11(7), 431; https://doi.org/10.3390/insects11070431 - 10 Jul 2020
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 954
Abstract
Until recently, the Old World bollworm (OWB) Helicoverpa armigera (Hübner) and the corn earworm Helicoverpa zea (Boddie) (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae) were geographically isolated. Both species are major pests of agricultural commodities that are known to develop insecticide resistance, and they now coexist in areas [...] Read more.
Until recently, the Old World bollworm (OWB) Helicoverpa armigera (Hübner) and the corn earworm Helicoverpa zea (Boddie) (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae) were geographically isolated. Both species are major pests of agricultural commodities that are known to develop insecticide resistance, and they now coexist in areas where H. armigera invaded the Americas. This is the first study to compare the susceptibility of the two species to conventional insecticides. The susceptibility of third instar H. armigera and H. zea larvae to indoxacarb, methomyl, spinetoram, and spinosad was determined using a diet-overlay bioassay in a quarantine laboratory in Puerto Rico. Mortality was assessed at 48 h after exposure for up to eight concentrations per insecticide. Spinetoram exhibited the highest acute toxicity against H. armigera, with a median lethal concentration (LC50) of 0.11 µg a.i./cm2, followed by indoxacarb and spinosad (0.17 µg a.i./cm2 for both) and methomyl (0.32 µg a.i./cm2). Spinetoram was also the most toxic to H. zea (LC50 of 0.08 µg a.i./cm2), followed by spinosad (0.17 µg a.i./cm2) and methomyl (0.18 µg a.i./cm2). Indoxacarb was the least toxic to H. zea, with an LC50 of 0.21 µg a.i./cm2. These findings could serve as a comparative reference for monitoring the susceptibility of H. armigera and H. zea to indoxacarb, methomyl, spinetoram, and spinosad in Puerto Rico, and may facilitate the detection of field-selected resistance for these two species and their potential hybrids in areas recently invaded by H. armigera. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Invasive Arthropod Pests)
Open AccessArticle
Minimum Winter Temperature as a Limiting Factor of the Potential Spread of Agrilus planipennis, an Alien Pest of Ash Trees, in Europe
Insects 2020, 11(4), 258; https://doi.org/10.3390/insects11040258 - 23 Apr 2020
Cited by 3 | Viewed by 856
Abstract
The emerald ash borer, EAB (Agrilus planipennis) is a devastating alien pest of ash trees. It is spreading in European Russia and Ukraine and will appear in other European countries. Our aim was to determine the regions of Europe where the [...] Read more.
The emerald ash borer, EAB (Agrilus planipennis) is a devastating alien pest of ash trees. It is spreading in European Russia and Ukraine and will appear in other European countries. Our aim was to determine the regions of Europe where the winter temperature drops low enough to prevent A. planipennis establishment. We calculated the minimum daily air temperature from 2003–2019 for each grid square (0.5° × 0.5°) in East Asia, North America and Europe and determined the minimum daily temperature in the grid squares where A. planipennis was recorded. Temperatures of −30 to −33 °C occur in the northern portions of the pest range on all continents. No established population has been recorded in localities where temperatures below −34 °C occur. This temperature is close to the absolute supercooling point of A. planipennis larva (−35.3 °C). It is unlikely that low temperatures could prevent the spread of A. planipennis in northern Western Europe (Sweden, Norway, Finland, etc.), since the temperature in this area did not fall to −34 °C from 2003–2019. However, such temperatures are not rare in eastern European Russia (Kostroma, Vologda, Orenburg regions, etc.), where Fraxinus pennsylvanica and F. excelsior occur. These regions could potentially become refuges for these ash species. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Invasive Arthropod Pests)
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Open AccessArticle
Detection of the Lychee Erinose Mite, Aceria litchii (Keifer) (Acari: Eriophyidae) in Florida, USA: A Comparison with Other Alien Populations
Insects 2020, 11(4), 235; https://doi.org/10.3390/insects11040235 - 09 Apr 2020
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Abstract
The lychee erinose mite (LEM), Aceria litchii (Keifer) is a serious pest of lychee (Litchi chinensis Sonn.). LEM causes a type of gall called ‘erineum’ (abnormal felty growth of trichomes from the epidermis), where it feeds, reproduces and protects itself from biotic [...] Read more.
The lychee erinose mite (LEM), Aceria litchii (Keifer) is a serious pest of lychee (Litchi chinensis Sonn.). LEM causes a type of gall called ‘erineum’ (abnormal felty growth of trichomes from the epidermis), where it feeds, reproduces and protects itself from biotic and abiotic adversities. In February of 2018, LEM was found in a commercial lychee orchard on Pine Island, Florida. Infestations were recorded on young leaves, stems, and inflorescences of approximately 30 young trees (1.5–3.0 yrs.) of three lychee varieties presenting abundant new growth. Although LEM is present in Hawaii, this mite is a prioritized quarantine pest in the continental USA and its territories. Florida LEM specimens showed small morphological differences from the original taxonomic descriptions of Keifer (1943) and Huang (2008). The observed differences are probably an artifact of the drawings in the original descriptions. Molecular comparisons were conducted on the DNA of LEM specimens from India, Hawaii, Brazil, Taiwan, Australia and Florida. The amplified COI fragment showed very low nucleotide variation among the locations and thus, could be used for accurate LEM identification. The ITS1 sequences and partial 5.8S fragments displayed no nucleotide differences for specimens from any of the locations except Australia. Consistent differences were observed in the ITS2 and 28S fragments. The ITS1-ITS2 concatenated phylogeny yielded two lineages, with Australia in one group and Hawaii, India, Brazil, Florida and Taiwan in another. Specimens from Taiwan and Florida present identical ITS and rDNA segments, suggesting a common origin; however, analysis of additional sequences is needed to confirm the origin of the Florida population. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Invasive Arthropod Pests)
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Open AccessArticle
Influence of Temperature on Age-Stage, Two-Sex Life Tables for a Minnesota-Acclimated Population of the Brown Marmorated Stink Bug (Halyomorpha halys)
Insects 2020, 11(2), 108; https://doi.org/10.3390/insects11020108 - 07 Feb 2020
Cited by 8 | Viewed by 1450
Abstract
Temperature is a critical single factor influencing insect population dynamics, and is foundational for improving our understanding of the phenology of invasive species adapting to new agroecosystems or in the process of range expansion. An age-stage, two-sex life table was therefore developed to [...] Read more.
Temperature is a critical single factor influencing insect population dynamics, and is foundational for improving our understanding of the phenology of invasive species adapting to new agroecosystems or in the process of range expansion. An age-stage, two-sex life table was therefore developed to analyze fundamental demographic features such as development, survival, and reproduction of a Minnesota-acclimated population of the invasive brown marmorated stink bug (Halyomorpha halys), in the north central USA. All salient life history parameters were estimated to better understand the population growth potential of H. halys at the current limit of its northern range in North America. We examined the effect of selected constant temperatures on immature development and survival (15–39 °C), adult reproduction and longevity (17–36 °C) of H. halys in the laboratory. The Minnesota population developed faster and survived at higher rates relative to a population that had previously established in Pennsylvania, USA. Mean generation time for the Minnesota population was minimized at 30 °C, while survival and fecundity were maximized at 27 and 23 °C, respectively. Given these findings, we assessed the effect of temperature on the intrinsic rate of increase ( r m ), the life table parameter that integrates the effects of temperature on development, survival, and reproduction. A Ratkowsky model predicted r m was maximized (0.0899) at 27.5 °C. We discuss the implications of our findings for understanding population growth rates for H. halys in the context of a warming climate, and potential to emerge as a serious crop pest in the Midwest U.S. region. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Invasive Arthropod Pests)
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Open AccessArticle
Influence of Temperature on the Interaction for Resource Utilization between Fall Armyworm, Spodoptera frugiperda (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae), and a Community of Lepidopteran Maize Stemborers Larvae
Insects 2020, 11(2), 73; https://doi.org/10.3390/insects11020073 - 21 Jan 2020
Cited by 5 | Viewed by 1290
Abstract
Intra- and interspecific interactions within communities of species that utilize the same resources are characterized by competition or facilitation. The noctuid stemborers, Busseola fusca and Sesamia calamistis, and the crambid stemborer, Chilo partellus were the most important pests of maize in sub-Saharan [...] Read more.
Intra- and interspecific interactions within communities of species that utilize the same resources are characterized by competition or facilitation. The noctuid stemborers, Busseola fusca and Sesamia calamistis, and the crambid stemborer, Chilo partellus were the most important pests of maize in sub-Saharan Africa before the recent “invasion” of fall armyworm (FAW), Spodoptera frugiperda, which currently seriously limits maize yields in Africa. This new pest is interacting with the stemborer community at the larval stage in the use of maize resources. From previous works on the influence of temperature on the larval intra- and interspecific resources utilization within the community of Lepidoptera stemborers involving B. fusca, S. calamistis, and C. partellus, there is a need to update these studies by adding the new pest, S. frugiperda, in order to understand the effect of temperature on the larval interactions of all these four species under the context of climate change. The influence of temperature on intra- and interspecific larval interactions was studied using artificial stems kept at different constant temperatures (15 °C, 20 °C, 25 °C, and 30 °C) in an incubator and assessing survival and relative growth rates of each species in single and multi-species experiments. After the inclusion of FAW into the experiments, with regard to relative growth rates, both intra- and interspecific competition was observed among all four species. With regard to survival rates, cannibalism can also explain the intra- and interspecific interactions observed among all four species. Interspecific competition was stronger between the stemborers than between the FAW and the stemborers. Similar to lepidopteran stemborers, temperature affected both survival and relative growth rates of the FAW as well. Regardless of the temperature, C. partellus was superior in interspecific interactions shown by higher relative growth and survival rates. The results suggest that the FAW will co-exist with stemborer species along entire temperature gradient, though competition and/or cannibalism with them is weak. In addition, temperature increases caused by climate change is likely to confer an advantage to C. partellus over the fall armyworm and the other noctuids. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Invasive Arthropod Pests)
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Review

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Open AccessReview
Coffee Berry Borer (Hypothenemus hampei), a Global Pest of Coffee: Perspectives from Historical and Recent Invasions, and Future Priorities
Insects 2020, 11(12), 882; https://doi.org/10.3390/insects11120882 - 12 Dec 2020
Cited by 3 | Viewed by 1143
Abstract
Coffee berry borer (Hypothenemus hampei (Ferrari), CBB) has invaded nearly every coffee-producing country in the world, and it is commonly recognized as the most damaging insect pest of coffee. While research has been conducted on this pest in individual coffee-growing regions, new [...] Read more.
Coffee berry borer (Hypothenemus hampei (Ferrari), CBB) has invaded nearly every coffee-producing country in the world, and it is commonly recognized as the most damaging insect pest of coffee. While research has been conducted on this pest in individual coffee-growing regions, new insights may be gained by comparing and contrasting patterns of invasion and response across its global distribution. In this review, we explore the existing literature and focus on common themes in the invasion biology of CBB by examining (1) how it was introduced into each particular region and the response to its invasion, (2) flight activity and infestation patterns, (3) economic impacts, and (4) management strategies. We highlight research conducted over the last ten years in Hawaii as a case study for the development and implementation of an effective integrated pest management (IPM) program for CBB, and also discuss biosecurity issues contributing to incursion and establishment. Potential areas for future research in each of the five major components of CBB IPM (monitoring and sampling, cultural, biological, chemical, and physical controls) are also presented. Finally, we emphasize that outreach efforts are crucial to the successful implementation of CBB IPM programs. Future research programs should strive to include coffee growers as much as possible to ensure that management options are feasible and cost-effective. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Invasive Arthropod Pests)
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