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Influence of Temperature on Age-Stage, Two-Sex Life Tables for a Minnesota-Acclimated Population of the Brown Marmorated Stink Bug (Halyomorpha halys)

Department of Entomology, University of Minnesota, St. Paul, MN 55108, USA
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Insects 2020, 11(2), 108; https://doi.org/10.3390/insects11020108
Received: 21 December 2019 / Revised: 22 January 2020 / Accepted: 6 February 2020 / Published: 7 February 2020
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Invasive Arthropod Pests)
Temperature is a critical single factor influencing insect population dynamics, and is foundational for improving our understanding of the phenology of invasive species adapting to new agroecosystems or in the process of range expansion. An age-stage, two-sex life table was therefore developed to analyze fundamental demographic features such as development, survival, and reproduction of a Minnesota-acclimated population of the invasive brown marmorated stink bug (Halyomorpha halys), in the north central USA. All salient life history parameters were estimated to better understand the population growth potential of H. halys at the current limit of its northern range in North America. We examined the effect of selected constant temperatures on immature development and survival (15–39 °C), and adult reproduction longevity (17–36 °C) of H. halys in the laboratory. The Minnesota population developed faster and survived at higher rates relative to a population that had previously established in Pennsylvania, USA. Mean generation time for the Minnesota population was minimized at 30 °C, while survival and fecundity were maximized at 27 and 23 °C, respectively. Given these findings, we assessed the effect of temperature on the intrinsic rate of increase (rm), the life table parameter that integrates the effects of temperature on development, survival, and reproduction. A Ratkowsky model predicted rmwas maximized (0.0899) at 27.5 °C. We discuss the implications of our findings for understanding population growth rates for H. halys in the context of a warming climate, and potential to emerge as a serious crop pest in the Midwest U.S. region.
Keywords: brown marmorated stink bug; temperature; development; intrinsic rate of increase; thermal optimum; age-stage two-sex life tables brown marmorated stink bug; temperature; development; intrinsic rate of increase; thermal optimum; age-stage two-sex life tables
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MDPI and ACS Style

Govindan, B.N.; Hutchison, W.D. Influence of Temperature on Age-Stage, Two-Sex Life Tables for a Minnesota-Acclimated Population of the Brown Marmorated Stink Bug (Halyomorpha halys). Insects 2020, 11, 108.

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