Special Issue "Insects-Environment Interaction"

A special issue of Insects (ISSN 2075-4450).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 May 2020.

Special Issue Editors

Dr. Tania Nobre
E-Mail Website
Collection Editor
Laboratory of Entomology ICAAM, Universidade de Évora, Portugal
Interests: insect interactions; symbiosis; pest management; sustainable agriculture; biocontrol
Dr. Sofia G. Seabra
E-Mail Website
Collection Editor
cE3c - Centre for Ecology, Evolution and Environmental Changes, Faculdade de Ciências, Universidade de Lisboa, Portugal
Interests: evolutionary biology, genomics of adaptation, population genetics, landscape genetics
Prof. Paulo A. V. Borges
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Faculty of Agrarian and Environmental Sciences, Department of Environmental Sciences, University of the Azores, Rua Capitão João D'Avila 9700-042 Angra do Heroísmo Terceira, Azores, Portugal
Interests: macroecology; community ecology (SADs; SARs); island biogeography; conservation; beetle taxonomy; bioespeleology, termite Control; insect pollination
Special Issues and Collections in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Insects represent the largest and most diverse group of living organisms and are implicated in a wide spectrum of interactions within the environment that they inhabit. Understanding how insects adopt an appropriate adaptive response to changes in their environment will aid in conserving nature and ecosystem services and is also of benefit for agriculture and forestry. Insect–environment interactions comprise complex associations, ranging from symbiosis and pollination, to (multi)trophic relations and co-evolution of defenses, or to nutrient re-cycling and response to climate change. For this Special Issue, we invite the submission of original research papers and mini-reviews covering all aspects of insect–environment interactions, both in natural and agricultural systems.

Dr. Tania Nobre
Dr. Sofia G. Seabra
Prof. Paulo A. V. Borges
Collection Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Insects is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1400 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • insects interactions
  • symbiosis
  • climate change
  • trophic interactions
  • adaptation

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

Open AccessArticle
How Bees Respond Differently to Field Margins of Shrubby and Herbaceous Plants in Intensive Agricultural Crops of the Mediterranean Area
Insects 2020, 11(1), 26; https://doi.org/10.3390/insects11010026 - 29 Dec 2019
Cited by 1
Abstract
(1) Intensive agriculture has a high impact on pollinating insects, and conservation strategies targeting agricultural landscapes may greatly contribute to their maintenance. The aim of this work was to quantify the effect that the vegetation of crop margins, with either herbaceous or shrubby [...] Read more.
(1) Intensive agriculture has a high impact on pollinating insects, and conservation strategies targeting agricultural landscapes may greatly contribute to their maintenance. The aim of this work was to quantify the effect that the vegetation of crop margins, with either herbaceous or shrubby plants, had on the abundance and diversity of bees in comparison to non-restored margins. (2) The work was carried out in an area of intensive agriculture in southern Spain. Bees were monitored visually and using pan traps, and floral resources were quantified in crop margins for two years. (3) An increase in the abundance and diversity of wild bees in restored margins was registered, compared to non-restored margins. Significant differences in the structure of bee communities were found between shrubby and herbaceous margins. Apis mellifera and mining bees were found to be more polylectic than wild Apidae and Megachilidae. The abundance of A. mellifera and mining bees was correlated to the total floral resources, in particular, to those offered by the Boraginaceae and Brassicaceae; wild Apidae and Megachilidae were associated with the Lamiaceae. (4) This work emphasises the importance of floral diversity and shrubby plants for the maintenance of rich bee communities in Mediterranean agricultural landscapes. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Insects-Environment Interaction)
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Open AccessArticle
Response to Multiple Stressors: Enhanced Tolerance of Neoseiulus barkeri Hughes (Acari: Phytoseiidae) to Heat and Desiccation Stress through Acclimation
Insects 2019, 10(12), 449; https://doi.org/10.3390/insects10120449 - 13 Dec 2019
Abstract
Organisms are always confronted with multiple stressors simultaneously. Combinations of stressors, rather than single stressor, may be more appropriate in evaluating the stress they experience. N. barkeri is one of predatory mite species that are commercialized for controlling spider mites. However, their biological [...] Read more.
Organisms are always confronted with multiple stressors simultaneously. Combinations of stressors, rather than single stressor, may be more appropriate in evaluating the stress they experience. N. barkeri is one of predatory mite species that are commercialized for controlling spider mites. However, their biological control efficiency was often reduced because of high temperature and desiccation in summer. To understand how to improve the tolerance of N. barkeri to combined heat and desiccation stress, we pre-exposed the adult female of N. barkeri to high temperature, desiccation and high temperature × desiccation stress for acclimation. After proper recovery time, mites were subjected to high temperature × desiccation stress again to detect the acclimation effects. The results are as follows: (1) No decrease in mortality rate were observed under high temperature × desiccation stress after heat acclimation. Instead, it increased significantly with acclimation temperature and time. (2) Dehydration acclimation both at 25 °C and high temperatures reduced mortality rate under high temperature × desiccation stress. Mortality rate was only significantly correlated with the amount of water loss, but not with temperature or water loss rate in acclimation, suggesting the increased tolerance is related to dehydration stress rather than heat stress. Among all acclimations, chronic dehydration at 25 °C, 50% relative humidity were the most effective treatment. This study indicated dehydration acclimation is effective to enhance tolerance of N. barkeri to combined heat and desiccation stress, which can improve the efficiency of biological control under multiple stressors. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Insects-Environment Interaction)
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