Special Issue "Advances in Diptera Biology"

A special issue of Insects (ISSN 2075-4450). This special issue belongs to the section "Insect Ecology, Diversity and Conservation".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 30 June 2021.

Special Issue Editors

Prof. Aaron M. Tarone
Website
Guest Editor
Department of Entomology, Texas A&M University, College Station, TX 77843, USA
Interests: Diptera;flies;genomic studies;development and population biology
Prof. Joshua B. Benoit
Website
Guest Editor
Department of Biological Sciences, University of Cincinnati, Cincinnati, OH 45221, USA
Interests: Insect stress tolerance;reproductive physiology;regulation of metabolism and aging

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Flies are a significant order of insects and a major contributor to biodiversity. Flies are also surprisingly resilient, finding ways to survive in harsh environments. For example, they are the only order of insects known to live in Antarctica. Given their unique and diverse biology, it is not surprising that flies are regularly studied in the context of their evolution and ecology and that one of the major model organisms (Drosophila melanogaster) is a fly.

The diptera impact human society in a variety of ways. Many flies have negative impacts on humanity.  Tsetse flies, sand flies, and mosquitoes are significant disease vectors that impact millions of people every year. Other families are major pests impacting crops, livestock production, and human health.  Nonetheless, flies also positively affect people. Flies are an emerging focus of a growing industry devoted to recycling used organic materials. Likewise, some are known for their contributions to medicine through “maggot therapy”, some as forensic indicator species, and many are pollinators.

Given the importance of flies, and recent advances in technology that enable better research in model and nonmodel organisms, this Special Issue highlights new knowledge acquired in the study of these important organisms.

Prof. Aaron M. Tarone
Prof. Joshua B. Benoit
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Insects is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1400 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Medical and veterinary entomology
  • decomposer
  • myiasis
  • agriculture
  • life history

Published Papers (1 paper)

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Research

Open AccessArticle
Interpreting Morphological Adaptations Associated with Viviparity in the Tsetse Fly Glossina morsitans (Westwood) by Three-Dimensional Analysis
Insects 2020, 11(10), 651; https://doi.org/10.3390/insects11100651 - 23 Sep 2020
Abstract
Tsetse flies (genus Glossina), the sole vectors of African trypanosomiasis, are distinct from most other insects, due to dramatic morphological and physiological adaptations required to support their unique biology. These adaptations are driven by demands associated with obligate hematophagy and viviparous reproduction. [...] Read more.
Tsetse flies (genus Glossina), the sole vectors of African trypanosomiasis, are distinct from most other insects, due to dramatic morphological and physiological adaptations required to support their unique biology. These adaptations are driven by demands associated with obligate hematophagy and viviparous reproduction. Obligate viviparity entails intrauterine larval development and the provision of maternal nutrients for the developing larvae. The reduced reproductive capacity/rate associated with this biology results in increased inter- and intra-sexual competition. Here, we use phase contrast microcomputed tomography (pcMicroCT) to analyze morphological adaptations associated with viviparous biology. These include (1) modifications facilitating abdominal distention required during blood feeding and pregnancy, (2) abdominal and uterine musculature adaptations for gestation and parturition of developed larvae, (3) reduced ovarian structure and capacity, (4) structural features of the male-derived spermatophore optimizing semen/sperm delivery and inhibition of insemination by competing males and (5) structural features of the milk gland facilitating nutrient incorporation and transfer into the uterus. Three-dimensional analysis of these features provides unprecedented opportunities for examination and discovery of internal morphological features not possible with traditional microscopy techniques and provides new opportunities for comparative morphological analyses over time and between species. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advances in Diptera Biology)
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