Special Issue "Advanced Materials and Technology for Resilient Bridge Infrastructures"

A special issue of Infrastructures (ISSN 2412-3811).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 30 June 2019

Special Issue Editor

Guest Editor
Dr. Armin Mehrabi

Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering; College of Engineering and Computing; Florida International University, 10555 West Flagler Street, EC 3627; Miami, FL 33174; USA
Website | E-Mail
Interests: bridge; accelerated bridge construction; condition assessment; rehabilitation; non-destructive evaluation; stay cables; cable-supported; life cycle analysis; wind effects; vibration

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Bridges occupy a key position in the surface transportation system and need to provide reliable access during ordinary and extraordinary times. They become even more important for evacuation, rescue, and recovery efforts before, during, and after extreme events such as storms, hurricanes, earthquakes, sea water level rise, and other natural and man-made hazards. These efforts will be significantly hindered if bridges are damaged and become inoperative. Hence, it is essential that bridges have “resiliency” against such adverse effects. The National Academies of Science defines “resilience” as “the ability of a system to prepare, absorb, recovery from, and successfully adapt to adverse events.” Accordingly, for a bridge to be resilient, not only it should be designed and constructed to reliably withstand the adverse effects, but also rapid condition assessment, recovery and restoration of its service should be feasible with the least possible efforts. Innovative solutions and technologies for design and construction of new bridges and for retrofitting the existing bridges are therefore imperative for providing better resiliency. Further, an accurate knowledge of the condition of bridges in a transportation network before, during, and after an extreme event, and decision making for inspection, maintenance, repair and recovery efforts is as important if not more.

Various technologies have been used in the past and are in development to isolate the bridge structure from adverse effects or to absorb the effects with minimal damage. Some solutions focus on limiting damage to elements that can be repaired or replaced for fast recovery. New and durable materials have been also recognized as a means to retain the capacity of bridges in longer term and resist adverse environmental conditions. Accelerated construction using special elements, materials, connections, and installation methods have attempted to provide for bridges with higher quality and rapid repair, replacement, and restoration objectives. Smart structures and self-healing materials have also been investigated for applications in future generation of resilient bridges.

Innovative approaches to health monitoring, condition assessment, and reliability analysis of bridges, along with risk- and reliability-based decision-making processes for maintenance, retrofit, repair, and restoration also play important role in improving resilience for individual bridges as well as for a network of roads and bridges. Structural health monitoring and condition assessment have evolved significantly in recent years with introduction of innovative sensors, data communication, and non-destructive evaluation. These methods have been augmented by the use of drones and robots for rapid and efficient assessment of damages in small and large scales.    

This Special Issue of journal attempts to collect state-of-the-art in materials and technologies for design, construction, repair, and restoration of bridges for resiliency, as well as means and methods for evaluation of bridges and decision-making processes for individual bridges and bridges within a transportation network.

Dr. Armin Mehrabi
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Infrastructures is an international peer-reviewed open access quarterly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) is waived for well-prepared manuscripts submitted to this issue. Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Bridge Design and Construction 
  • Resilience 
  • Extreme Events 
  • Innovative Materials 
  • Innovative Technologies 
  • Structural Health Monitoring 
  • Retrofitting 
  • Accelerated Repair
  • Accelerated Bridge Construction 
  • Risk-Based Decision Making

Published Papers (3 papers)

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Open AccessArticle
Polymer Concrete for Bridge Deck Closure Joints in Accelerated Bridge Construction
Infrastructures 2019, 4(2), 31; https://doi.org/10.3390/infrastructures4020031
Received: 12 May 2019 / Revised: 28 May 2019 / Accepted: 28 May 2019 / Published: 1 June 2019
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Abstract
Prefabricated concrete bridge deck panels are utilized in Accelerated Bridge Construction (ABC) to simplify bridge deck construction. Concrete with good bond and shear strength as well as excellent flowability is required to fill bridge deck closure joints. This paper discusses the use of [...] Read more.
Prefabricated concrete bridge deck panels are utilized in Accelerated Bridge Construction (ABC) to simplify bridge deck construction. Concrete with good bond and shear strength as well as excellent flowability is required to fill bridge deck closure joints. This paper discusses the use of polymer concrete (PC) for bridge deck closure joints in ABC. PC produced using poly methyl methacrylate and standard aggregate was tested. Test results of PC are compared to Ultra-High Performance Concrete (UHPC). Development length, lap splice length and shear strength of unreinforced PC were tested. It is shown that PC has a development length of 3.6 to 4.1 times the reinforcing bar diameter that is close to one-half the development length of 6 to 8 times the bar diameter required with UHPC. PC also showed a shorter splice length compared with that reported for UHPC. Finally, unreinforced PC showed shear strength that is twice that of UHPC. It is evident that using PC in bridge deck closure joints in ABC can improve constructability and provide cost-savings and eliminate reinforcing bar congestion. Full article
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Open AccessArticle
Chloride Penetration at Cold Joints of Structural Members with Dissimilar Concrete Incorporating UHPC
Infrastructures 2019, 4(2), 18; https://doi.org/10.3390/infrastructures4020018
Received: 3 April 2019 / Revised: 22 April 2019 / Accepted: 22 April 2019 / Published: 24 April 2019
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Abstract
Ultra-high-performance concrete (UHPC) has been introduced for reinforced concrete structures due to its enhanced mechanical performance, including high compressive strength and tensile capacity. In certain applications, such as closure joints, connections, and concrete repairs, reinforcing steel may be embedded in dissimilar concrete elements [...] Read more.
Ultra-high-performance concrete (UHPC) has been introduced for reinforced concrete structures due to its enhanced mechanical performance, including high compressive strength and tensile capacity. In certain applications, such as closure joints, connections, and concrete repairs, reinforcing steel may be embedded in dissimilar concrete elements partially incorporating UHPC. Superficially, UHPC can be considered to provide enhanced corrosion durability in marine environments due to its low permeability which would mitigate chloride-induced corrosion of rebar in the bulk material. However, the chloride intrusion through cold joints can be faster than that in bulk concrete and may jeopardize the durability of structures. This research examines the possibility of enhanced chloride transport at the cold joint incorporating UHPC. The effectiveness of the bond on chloride penetration at the concrete interface with various levels of moisture availability for the substrate at the time of UHPC repair was examined. To this effect, the substrate concrete was conditioned to different moisture content including 0%, 75%, and 100% relative humidity, and soaked prior to UHPC repair concrete casting. Chloride penetration was accelerated by an impressed current source and assessed by silver nitrate solution sprayed on the cold joint. Moreover, the tensile bond strength between substrate concrete and UHPC was measured using the splitting tensile test. Full article
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Other

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Open AccessTechnical Note
Durable Bridge Columns using Stay-In-Place UHPC Shells for Accelerated Bridge Construction
Infrastructures 2019, 4(2), 25; https://doi.org/10.3390/infrastructures4020025
Received: 2 April 2019 / Revised: 6 May 2019 / Accepted: 11 May 2019 / Published: 13 May 2019
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Abstract
Ultra-high performance concrete (UHPC) is a durable material that allows the construction of innovative structural elements and conforms with accelerated bridge construction (ABC) goals. The main idea of this research is to utilize UHPC to prefabricate a shell that acts as a stay-in-place [...] Read more.
Ultra-high performance concrete (UHPC) is a durable material that allows the construction of innovative structural elements and conforms with accelerated bridge construction (ABC) goals. The main idea of this research is to utilize UHPC to prefabricate a shell that acts as a stay-in-place form for bridge columns. The prefabricated shell eliminates the conventional formwork while reducing the on-site construction time and acting as a durable protective layer for the normal concrete inside the shell against environmental attacks. In addition, the UHPC shell provides additional confinement to the column concrete, which improves the column’s structural performance. During construction and after completing the column reinforcement work onsite, based on the conventional construction methods, the prefabricated UHPC shell is placed around the column reinforcement, followed by casting a portion of UHPC for a column-to-footing connection, which improves the capacity of the connection and shifts the plastic hinge zone above the connection. Once the UHPC portion hardens, normal concrete is placed inside the shell, forming a permanent concrete-filled UHPC shell. The construction process is finalized by placing and connecting a prefabricated cap beam to the column through the same developed connection as that in this research. This technical note presents the development of two test specimens using an UHPC shell in lieu of a conventional formwork with the advantage of improving the column performance and durability. Full article
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