Special Issue "Recent Advance and Future Trends in Pavement Engineering"

A special issue of Infrastructures (ISSN 2412-3811).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 10 June 2019

Special Issue Editor

Guest Editor
Mrs. Patricia Kara De Maeijer

Energy & Materials in Infrastructure & Buildings (EMIB), Faculty of Applied Engineering, University of Antwerp, 171 Groenenborgerlaan, 2020 Antwerp, Belgium
Website | E-Mail
Interests: real-time pavement monitoring, road pavement design, asphalt and concrete technology, recycling of industrial wastes and by-products, environmental management

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Pavement engineering uses engineering techniques to design and maintain flexible (asphalt) and rigid (concrete) pavements. Pavement design has gradually evolved within the last century. Prior to the early 1920s, for example, the thickness of pavement was based purely on experience, in the late 1990s, it was already based on application of various developed methods for determining the required thickness of the pavement. The acquired real information regarding traffic and climate in pavement design was possible due to move from empirical methods to mechanistic empirical methods in pavement design, where sound principles were used, for example, to predict stress and strain. Nowadays, a certain difference in quality between designed and constructed pavements is still observed. Therefore, current pavement design, construction and maintenance requirements must be improved. This refers to: 1) real-time data collection (not prediction) from the current traffic intensity and loading, pavement behavior (stress and strain), pavement temperature at different layers, etc.; 2) effective pavement structural design; 3) pavement mix design; 4) pavement bituminous and alternative materials; and 5) application of innovative technologies for the pavement construction, compaction, monitoring and maintenance. Prof. André A.A. Molenaar mentioned during ISAP2018 that “in reality strain signals are completely different from what we use in our tests” but we can verify predicted stress and strain values with real-time values by the monitoring of pavements, for example, by means of installation of fiber Bragg grating sensors in pavement. In the era for industrial technology, asphalt and concrete materials can be integrated into the category of smart materials. Therefore, in a few years, asphalt and concrete industries will need to accommodate more to the innovative solutions for the construction and maintenance of pavements.

This Special Issue, “Recent Advance and Future Trends in Pavement Engineering”, aims to provide an overview of current innovative pavement engineering ideas, which have the potential to be implemented in industry in the future, covering all recent developments in pavement design, its construction and monitoring.

Mrs. Patricia Kara De Maeijer
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Infrastructures is an international peer-reviewed open access quarterly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) is waived for well-prepared manuscripts submitted to this issue. Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • effective pavement structural design
  • modelling
  • flexible and rigid pavements
  • mix design
  • bituminous and alternative materials
  • recycled asphalt materials
  • compaction
  • real-time monitoring
  • maintenance
  • specifications

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

Open AccessArticle Peat Fibers and Finely Ground Peat Powder for Application in Asphalt
Infrastructures 2019, 4(1), 3; https://doi.org/10.3390/infrastructures4010003
Received: 20 November 2018 / Revised: 12 December 2018 / Accepted: 28 December 2018 / Published: 4 January 2019
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Abstract
In this study, the feasibility of a natural peat fiber and finely ground peat powder as a modifier for bitumen was investigated. Initially, the as-received peat material was characterized in detail: the material was ground to various degrees, separated into fiber and powder [...] Read more.
In this study, the feasibility of a natural peat fiber and finely ground peat powder as a modifier for bitumen was investigated. Initially, the as-received peat material was characterized in detail: the material was ground to various degrees, separated into fiber and powder fractions, and the gradation of the powder fraction as well as the size of the fibers were determined. A possible solubility in bitumen, the moisture content, and the density of both fractions were evaluated, and a limited chemical characterization of the fibers was conducted. Secondly, the rheological behavior of the powder and the fibers when blended with bitumen was evaluated. Additionally, a limited asphalt study was conducted. The rheological data showed the stiffening effects of the powder fraction and the presence of a fiber network, which were obvious as a plateau modulus towards lower frequencies. The fiber network was strain-dependent and showed elastic effects. This was further confirmed by the multiple stress creep recovery (MSCRT) tests. These tests also indicated that the fibers should improve the rutting resistance, although it was not possible to confirm this in asphalt rutting tests. Asphalt drainage tests demonstrated that adding dry peat, whether this is ground or not, is effective in reducing the binder drainage. However, the data also revealed that the amount of added peat fibers and powder should be limited to avoid difficulties in the compaction of these asphalt mixes. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Recent Advance and Future Trends in Pavement Engineering)
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Open AccessArticle A Comparative Study of Laser Doppler Vibrometers for Vibration Measurements on Pavement Materials
Infrastructures 2018, 3(4), 47; https://doi.org/10.3390/infrastructures3040047
Received: 5 October 2018 / Revised: 30 October 2018 / Accepted: 30 October 2018 / Published: 1 November 2018
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Abstract
A laser Doppler vibrometer (LDV) is a noncontact optical measurement device to measure the vibration velocities of particular points on the surface of an object. Even though LDV has become more popular in road engineering in recent years, their signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) is [...] Read more.
A laser Doppler vibrometer (LDV) is a noncontact optical measurement device to measure the vibration velocities of particular points on the surface of an object. Even though LDV has become more popular in road engineering in recent years, their signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) is strongly dependent on light scattering properties of the surface which, in some cases, needs to be properly conditioned. SNR is the main limitation in LDV instrumentation when measuring on low diffusive surfaces like pavements; therefore, an investigation on the SNR of different LDV devices on different surface conditions is of great importance. The objective of this research is to investigate the quality of two types of commercially available LDV systems—helium–neon (He–Ne)-based vibrometers and recently developed infrared vibrometers—on different surface conditions, i.e., retroreflective tape, white tape, black tape, and asphalt concrete. Both noise floor and modal analysis experiments are carried out on these surface conditions. It is shown that the noise floor of the He–Ne LDV is higher when dealing with a noncooperative dark surface, such as asphalt concrete, and it can be improved by improving the surface quality or by using an infrared LDV, which consequently improves the modal analysis experiments performed on pavement materials. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Recent Advance and Future Trends in Pavement Engineering)
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