Special Issue "Critical Infrastructure Resilience Facing Extreme Weather Events"

A special issue of Infrastructures (ISSN 2412-3811).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 30 September 2022 | Viewed by 3643

Special Issue Editors

Dr. José Campos e Matos
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
ISISE, IB-S, Department of Civil Engineering, University of Minho, Campus de Azurém, 4800-058 Guimarães, Portugal
Interests: infrastructure management and maintenance; risk-based management systems; resilience and robustness; lifecycle costs; existing infrastructures
Dr. Hélder S. Sousa
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
ISISE, IB-S, Department of Civil Engineering, University of Minho, Campus de Azurém, 4800-058 Guimarães, Portugal
Interests: resilience; reliability; existing structures; nondestructive testing; monitoring; asset management; predictive models
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals
Prof. Dr. Alfred Strauss
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Institute of Structural Engineering, Department of Civil Engineering and Natural Hazards, University of Natural Resources and Life Sciences, 1190 Vienna, Austria
Interests: reliability; existing structures; nondestructive testing; monitoring; asset management; predictive models; nonlinear modeling techniques
Prof. Dr. Emilio Bastidas-Arteaga
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Laboratory of Engineering Sciences for Environment, UMR CNRS 7356, La Rochelle University, 17042 La Rochelle, France
Interests: climate-structures interaction; probabilistic weather models; climate adaptation engineering; time-series analysis

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Management of critical infrastructures requires the assessment of its lifecycle performance attending to its performance both in regular service conditions, as well as when facing extreme events. Their post-event response is of extreme importance to the recovery of society itself, and thus, design toward resilience is a major concern for new infrastructures. However, managers deal with the question of how to promote resilience for already existing infrastructures based on current codes and management tools. Either due to climate changes or due to human interaction, extreme weather event frequency and intensity are presenting an increasing trend. These events may cause severe threats to the normal service and functioning of critical infrastructures, both at a local scale as well as at a network level.

In this Special Issue, we solicit high-quality original research articles focused on the state-of-the-art techniques and methods employed in the design, management, and assessment of critical infrastructures’ resilience concerning extreme weather events. We welcome both theoretical and application papers of high technical standard across various disciplines, thus facilitating an awareness of techniques and methods in one area that may be applicable to other areas. We seek high-quality submissions of original research articles as well as review articles on all aspects related to critical infrastructure management that has the potential for practical application.

Topics of interest include but are not limited to:

  • Critical infrastructures related to transport, communication, electricity, water, and other supply and service infrastructures;
  • New design and assessment of existing structures toward resilience;
  • Quantification of extreme weather events influencing, directly and indirectly, the management of infrastructures;
  • Recent case studies and reported infrastructures failures (i.e., lessons learned);
  • Critical infrastructure safety and reliability and risk-informed decision making;
  • Advanced numerical analysis techniques and simulation;
  • Validations and verifications of the existing analysis techniques;
  • Monitoring, surveillance, and field measurement methods;
  • Advances in sustainable and resilient critical infrastructures;
  • Socioeconomic aspects related to service disruption of critical infrastructures; and
  • Good practices in planning and designing protective measures as well as crisis response and recovery capabilities.


Dr. José Campos e Matos
Dr. Hélder S. Sousa
Prof. Dr. Alfred Strauss
Prof. Emilio Bastidas-Arteaga
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Infrastructures is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1600 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • resilience
  • critical infrastructures
  • extreme events
  • reliability
  • safety

Published Papers (3 papers)

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Research

Article
Quality Control Method for the Service Life and Reliability of Concrete Structures
Infrastructures 2022, 7(2), 24; https://doi.org/10.3390/infrastructures7020024 - 16 Feb 2022
Viewed by 1011
Abstract
In the past few years, there has been an increasing societal and industrial demand for the reliable assessment and design of structural systems with service-life criteria of at least several decades. The life cycle characterisation of engineering structures in terms of an anticipated [...] Read more.
In the past few years, there has been an increasing societal and industrial demand for the reliable assessment and design of structural systems with service-life criteria of at least several decades. The life cycle characterisation of engineering structures in terms of an anticipated service life remains a significant aspect of sustainability in the construction industry. This requires special attention to the definition of structural performance under various actions, and to the implemented engineering materials and methods as well as to the inverse identification and monitoring of structural conditions. Subsequently, the focus remains on the development of a holistic performance-based design approach for new and existing structures and infrastructures. This paper presents the fundamental reliability concepts of performance-based design, with a focus on lifetime assessment. Case studies from actual structural components’ design are used to verify the proposed methodology and indicate the significance of quality assurance in the lifetime assessment of engineering structures. We also confirmed that reliability and quality assurance criteria are strongly connected. Therefore, a methodology for quality-based service life assessment is presented and elaborated in the case studies. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Critical Infrastructure Resilience Facing Extreme Weather Events)
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Article
Risk Assessment of Terrestrial Transportation Infrastructures Exposed to Extreme Events
Infrastructures 2021, 6(11), 163; https://doi.org/10.3390/infrastructures6110163 - 17 Nov 2021
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 920
Abstract
Keeping transport links open in adverse conditions and being able to restore connections quickly after extreme events are important and demanding tasks for infrastructure owners/operators. This paper is developed within the H2020 project SAFEWAY, whose main goal is to increase the resilience of [...] Read more.
Keeping transport links open in adverse conditions and being able to restore connections quickly after extreme events are important and demanding tasks for infrastructure owners/operators. This paper is developed within the H2020 project SAFEWAY, whose main goal is to increase the resilience of terrestrial transportation infrastructure. Risk-based approaches are excellent tools to aid in the decision-making process of planning maintenance and implementation of risk mitigation measures with the ultimate goal of reducing risk and increasing resilience. This paper presents a framework for quantitative risk assessment which guides an integrated assessment of the risk components: hazard, exposure, vulnerability and consequences of a malfunctioning transportation infrastructure. The paper guides the identification of failure modes for transportation infrastructure exposed to extreme events (natural and human-made) and provides models for and examples of hazard, vulnerability and risk assessment. Each assessment step must be made in coherence with the other risk components as an integral part of the risk assessment. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Critical Infrastructure Resilience Facing Extreme Weather Events)
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Article
Design of an Active Damping System for Vibration Control of Wind Turbine Towers
Infrastructures 2021, 6(11), 162; https://doi.org/10.3390/infrastructures6110162 - 11 Nov 2021
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 936
Abstract
The vibration of wind turbine towers is relevant to the reliability of the wind turbine structure and the quality of power production. It produces both ultimate loads and fatigue loads threatening structural safety. This paper aims to reduce vibration in wind turbine towers [...] Read more.
The vibration of wind turbine towers is relevant to the reliability of the wind turbine structure and the quality of power production. It produces both ultimate loads and fatigue loads threatening structural safety. This paper aims to reduce vibration in wind turbine towers using an active damper named the twin rotor damper (TRD). A single degree of freedom (SDOF) oscillator with the TRD is used to approximate the response of wind turbines under a unidirectional gusty wind with loss of the electrical network. The coincidence between the wind gust and the grid loss is studied to involve the maximum loading on the structure. The performance of the proposed damping system under the maximum loading is then evaluated on the state-of-the-art wind turbine NREL 5 MW. The effectiveness of the TRD is compared to a passive tuned mass damper (TMD) designed with similar requirements. The numerical results reveal that, at the 1st natural mode, the TRD outperforms the passive TMD by three to six times. Moreover, the results show that the TRD is effective in reducing ultimate loads on wind turbine towers. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Critical Infrastructure Resilience Facing Extreme Weather Events)
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