Critical Infrastructure Resilience Facing Extreme Weather Events

A special issue of Infrastructures (ISSN 2412-3811).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (31 August 2023) | Viewed by 22439

Special Issue Editors


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Guest Editor
Civil Engineering Department, School of Engineering, Minho University, Campus de Azurem, 4800-058 Guimaraes, Portugal
Interests: asset management systems; life-cycle costs (LCC); safety assessment; risk evaluation; sustainability
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Guest Editor
ISISE, IB-S, Department of Civil Engineering, University of Minho, Campus de Azurém, 4800-058 Guimarães, Portugal
Interests: resilience; reliability; existing structures; nondestructive testing; monitoring; asset management; predictive models
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

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Guest Editor
Institute for Structural Engineering, Department of Civil Engineering and Natural Hazards, University of Natural Resources and Life Sciences, Gregor-Mendel-Straße 33, 1180 Vienna, Austria
Interests: infrastructures; reliability engineering; life-cycle analysis; monitoring
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

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Guest Editor
Laboratory of Engineering Sciences for Environment, UMR CNRS 7356, La Rochelle University, 17042 La Rochelle, France
Interests: climate-structures interaction; probabilistic weather models; climate adaptation engineering; time-series analysis

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Management of critical infrastructures requires the assessment of its lifecycle performance attending to its performance both in regular service conditions, as well as when facing extreme events. Their post-event response is of extreme importance to the recovery of society itself, and thus, design toward resilience is a major concern for new infrastructures. However, managers deal with the question of how to promote resilience for already existing infrastructures based on current codes and management tools. Either due to climate changes or due to human interaction, extreme weather event frequency and intensity are presenting an increasing trend. These events may cause severe threats to the normal service and functioning of critical infrastructures, both at a local scale as well as at a network level.

In this Special Issue, we solicit high-quality original research articles focused on the state-of-the-art techniques and methods employed in the design, management, and assessment of critical infrastructures’ resilience concerning extreme weather events. We welcome both theoretical and application papers of high technical standard across various disciplines, thus facilitating an awareness of techniques and methods in one area that may be applicable to other areas. We seek high-quality submissions of original research articles as well as review articles on all aspects related to critical infrastructure management that has the potential for practical application.

Topics of interest include but are not limited to:

  • Critical infrastructures related to transport, communication, electricity, water, and other supply and service infrastructures;
  • New design and assessment of existing structures toward resilience;
  • Quantification of extreme weather events influencing, directly and indirectly, the management of infrastructures;
  • Recent case studies and reported infrastructures failures (i.e., lessons learned);
  • Critical infrastructure safety and reliability and risk-informed decision making;
  • Advanced numerical analysis techniques and simulation;
  • Validations and verifications of the existing analysis techniques;
  • Monitoring, surveillance, and field measurement methods;
  • Advances in sustainable and resilient critical infrastructures;
  • Socioeconomic aspects related to service disruption of critical infrastructures; and
  • Good practices in planning and designing protective measures as well as crisis response and recovery capabilities.


Dr. José Campos e Matos
Dr. Hélder S. Sousa
Prof. Dr. Alfred Strauss
Prof. Emilio Bastidas-Arteaga
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Infrastructures is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1800 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • resilience
  • critical infrastructures
  • extreme events
  • reliability
  • safety

Published Papers (7 papers)

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Research

22 pages, 62036 KiB  
Article
Influence of Corrosion on Dynamic Behavior of Pedestrian Steel Bridges—Case Study
by Susana Barrios, Andrés Guzmán and Albert Ortiz
Infrastructures 2023, 8(3), 52; https://doi.org/10.3390/infrastructures8030052 - 13 Mar 2023
Viewed by 2647
Abstract
Corrosion directly affects the structural stiffness of a steel element, reducing the thickness, thus inertia, due to the gradual deterioration of the material. Quickly identifying corrosion damage to the stiffness of a steel structure is a challenge in coastal environments since corrosion progresses [...] Read more.
Corrosion directly affects the structural stiffness of a steel element, reducing the thickness, thus inertia, due to the gradual deterioration of the material. Quickly identifying corrosion damage to the stiffness of a steel structure is a challenge in coastal environments since corrosion progresses rapidly, and traditional methods of inspection and diagnosis are time-consuming and costly. This is an important issue; therefore, characterization of the corrosion level represents a key element in making decisions regarding maintenance or structural integrity. This work estimates the relationship between the corrosion level in steel structures and their dynamic parameters using ambient vibration records. It comprises the characterization of the dynamic behavior and corrosion state of three full-scale pedestrian bridges with similar geometry, material, and structural configuration characteristics but with significant differences in the degree of deterioration. The structures were instrumented with piezoelectric sensors connected to a portable data acquisition system; the recorded information was analyzed with optimization algorithms in Python based on the power spectral density (PSD) of the vibrations of each bridge. The parameters obtained related to the degree of corrosion determine the incidence of the level of deterioration in the structural behavior, thus involving changes in its stiffness and mass. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Critical Infrastructure Resilience Facing Extreme Weather Events)
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15 pages, 10333 KiB  
Article
Effect of Sea Level Rise and Access Channel Deepening on Future Tidal Power Plants in Buenaventura Colombia
by Juan Gabriel Rueda-Bayona, José Luis García Vélez and Daniel Mateo Parrado-Vallejo
Infrastructures 2023, 8(3), 51; https://doi.org/10.3390/infrastructures8030051 - 13 Mar 2023
Viewed by 2144
Abstract
The evolution of tidal stream turbines is increasing the feasibility of future tidal plants in shallow depth areas with mid-tidal ranges (<5 m). However, extreme events such as changes in bathymetry due to the access channel deepening of coastal ports and sea level [...] Read more.
The evolution of tidal stream turbines is increasing the feasibility of future tidal plants in shallow depth areas with mid-tidal ranges (<5 m). However, extreme events such as changes in bathymetry due to the access channel deepening of coastal ports and sea level rise modify hydrodynamics and might affect the infrastructure and energy production of tidal energy converters. This research focused on Buenaventura Bay to analyze the effect of these extreme events on marine currents through calibrated-validated numerical modeling. Several monitored points were analyzed, and the results highlighted that the bay has potential for implementing tidal stream turbines because of the reported velocities between 0.25 and 2 m/s. The sea level rise increased 11.39% and access channel deepening reduced by 17.12% the velocity currents of the bay, respectively. These findings convert Buenaventura Bay to a candidate for implementing third generation tidal stream turbines and motivate future research for implementing tidal power systems in crucial areas such as the Colombian Pacific, where communities face restrictions in accessing affordable and clean energy. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Critical Infrastructure Resilience Facing Extreme Weather Events)
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23 pages, 3026 KiB  
Article
Stochastic Multiphasic Multivariate State-Based Degradation and Maintenance Meta-Models for RC Structures Subject to Chloride Ingress
by Boutros El Hajj, Bruno Castanier, Franck Schoefs and Emilio Bastidas-Arteaga
Infrastructures 2023, 8(2), 36; https://doi.org/10.3390/infrastructures8020036 - 16 Feb 2023
Cited by 3 | Viewed by 1574
Abstract
The objective of this paper is to propose tools for the lifecycle management of infrastructure by showing the slow degradation processes for which inspection data are accessible, especially the data obtained from non-destructive testing (NDT) and structural health monitoring (SHM). One major characteristic [...] Read more.
The objective of this paper is to propose tools for the lifecycle management of infrastructure by showing the slow degradation processes for which inspection data are accessible, especially the data obtained from non-destructive testing (NDT) and structural health monitoring (SHM). One major characteristic of these degradation processes is their multiphasic nature; consequently, they can be discretised into different phases with specific physical kinematics where specific maintenance actions and measurement techniques can be performed. Within this framework, we propose implementing a degradation meta-modelling approach fed with measurements (NDT, SHM). This approach is based on state-dependent stochastic processes for modelling the degradation and maintenance of reinforced concrete structures that are subjected to chloride-induced deterioration. The benefit of using multiphasic degradation meta-models in the lifecycle management of infrastructure is illustrated through numerical examples that include single and multi-action management policies. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Critical Infrastructure Resilience Facing Extreme Weather Events)
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20 pages, 870 KiB  
Article
Evaluation of Climate Change Resilience of Urban Road Network Strategies
by Siama Begum, Rachel S. Fisher, Emma J. S. Ferranti and Andrew D. Quinn
Infrastructures 2022, 7(11), 146; https://doi.org/10.3390/infrastructures7110146 - 25 Oct 2022
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 2989
Abstract
The impacts of the changing climate have caused extensive disruption to the road network in the United Kingdom in recent years. Roads are vital for economic growth and social wellbeing, and a disruption to the network can have disastrous consequences. Since the impacts [...] Read more.
The impacts of the changing climate have caused extensive disruption to the road network in the United Kingdom in recent years. Roads are vital for economic growth and social wellbeing, and a disruption to the network can have disastrous consequences. Since the impacts of climate change will be felt at regional and local levels, it is the responsibility of local highway authorities to establish effective policies to strengthen the resilience of their section of the road network. This report uses the West Midlands as a case study and aims to evaluate its regional highway network management strategies, to determine the extent to which they promote resilience to climate change. Recommendations and findings from other literature are used to establish a set of evaluation criteria to compare the maturity of highway network management strategies for the West Midlands region. The evaluation of the policy documents is used to rank the maturity of the strategies, and recommendations are made to local authorities to highlight where the strategies could be improved. The analysis highlights the fragmentation and disparity between highways strategies across the region and consequently the vulnerability of the region to climate change. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Critical Infrastructure Resilience Facing Extreme Weather Events)
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23 pages, 54026 KiB  
Article
Quality Control Method for the Service Life and Reliability of Concrete Structures
by Alfred Strauss, Panagiotis Spyridis, Ivan Zambon, Fabian Sattler and Eftychia Apostolidi
Infrastructures 2022, 7(2), 24; https://doi.org/10.3390/infrastructures7020024 - 16 Feb 2022
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 2999
Abstract
In the past few years, there has been an increasing societal and industrial demand for the reliable assessment and design of structural systems with service-life criteria of at least several decades. The life cycle characterisation of engineering structures in terms of an anticipated [...] Read more.
In the past few years, there has been an increasing societal and industrial demand for the reliable assessment and design of structural systems with service-life criteria of at least several decades. The life cycle characterisation of engineering structures in terms of an anticipated service life remains a significant aspect of sustainability in the construction industry. This requires special attention to the definition of structural performance under various actions, and to the implemented engineering materials and methods as well as to the inverse identification and monitoring of structural conditions. Subsequently, the focus remains on the development of a holistic performance-based design approach for new and existing structures and infrastructures. This paper presents the fundamental reliability concepts of performance-based design, with a focus on lifetime assessment. Case studies from actual structural components’ design are used to verify the proposed methodology and indicate the significance of quality assurance in the lifetime assessment of engineering structures. We also confirmed that reliability and quality assurance criteria are strongly connected. Therefore, a methodology for quality-based service life assessment is presented and elaborated in the case studies. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Critical Infrastructure Resilience Facing Extreme Weather Events)
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28 pages, 4838 KiB  
Article
Risk Assessment of Terrestrial Transportation Infrastructures Exposed to Extreme Events
by Unni Eidsvig, Monica Santamaría, Neryvaldo Galvão, Nikola Tanasic, Luca Piciullo, Rade Hajdin, Farrokh Nadim, Hélder S. Sousa and José Matos
Infrastructures 2021, 6(11), 163; https://doi.org/10.3390/infrastructures6110163 - 17 Nov 2021
Cited by 8 | Viewed by 3899
Abstract
Keeping transport links open in adverse conditions and being able to restore connections quickly after extreme events are important and demanding tasks for infrastructure owners/operators. This paper is developed within the H2020 project SAFEWAY, whose main goal is to increase the resilience of [...] Read more.
Keeping transport links open in adverse conditions and being able to restore connections quickly after extreme events are important and demanding tasks for infrastructure owners/operators. This paper is developed within the H2020 project SAFEWAY, whose main goal is to increase the resilience of terrestrial transportation infrastructure. Risk-based approaches are excellent tools to aid in the decision-making process of planning maintenance and implementation of risk mitigation measures with the ultimate goal of reducing risk and increasing resilience. This paper presents a framework for quantitative risk assessment which guides an integrated assessment of the risk components: hazard, exposure, vulnerability and consequences of a malfunctioning transportation infrastructure. The paper guides the identification of failure modes for transportation infrastructure exposed to extreme events (natural and human-made) and provides models for and examples of hazard, vulnerability and risk assessment. Each assessment step must be made in coherence with the other risk components as an integral part of the risk assessment. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Critical Infrastructure Resilience Facing Extreme Weather Events)
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24 pages, 3035 KiB  
Article
Design of an Active Damping System for Vibration Control of Wind Turbine Towers
by Hao Bai, Younes Aoues, Jean-Marc Cherfils and Didier Lemosse
Infrastructures 2021, 6(11), 162; https://doi.org/10.3390/infrastructures6110162 - 11 Nov 2021
Cited by 11 | Viewed by 4389
Abstract
The vibration of wind turbine towers is relevant to the reliability of the wind turbine structure and the quality of power production. It produces both ultimate loads and fatigue loads threatening structural safety. This paper aims to reduce vibration in wind turbine towers [...] Read more.
The vibration of wind turbine towers is relevant to the reliability of the wind turbine structure and the quality of power production. It produces both ultimate loads and fatigue loads threatening structural safety. This paper aims to reduce vibration in wind turbine towers using an active damper named the twin rotor damper (TRD). A single degree of freedom (SDOF) oscillator with the TRD is used to approximate the response of wind turbines under a unidirectional gusty wind with loss of the electrical network. The coincidence between the wind gust and the grid loss is studied to involve the maximum loading on the structure. The performance of the proposed damping system under the maximum loading is then evaluated on the state-of-the-art wind turbine NREL 5 MW. The effectiveness of the TRD is compared to a passive tuned mass damper (TMD) designed with similar requirements. The numerical results reveal that, at the 1st natural mode, the TRD outperforms the passive TMD by three to six times. Moreover, the results show that the TRD is effective in reducing ultimate loads on wind turbine towers. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Critical Infrastructure Resilience Facing Extreme Weather Events)
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