Special Issue "Advances in Structural Dynamics and Earthquake Engineering"

A special issue of Infrastructures (ISSN 2412-3811). This special issue belongs to the section "Infrastructures and Structural Engineering".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 December 2022 | Viewed by 8226

Special Issue Editor

Dr. Denise-Penelope N. Kontoni
E-Mail Website1 Website2
Guest Editor
Associate Professor, Department of Civil Engineering, School of Engineering, University of the Peloponnese, GR-26334 Patras, Greece
Interests: structural dynamics; earthquake engineering; seismic isolation; structural vibration control; soil-structure interaction; finite element method; boundary element method; computer-aided structural analysis; elastodynamics; elastoplasticity; soft computing; computer programming in civil engineering
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Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

I am pleased to invite your cutting-edge original research articles as well as high-quality review papers to this Special Issue on “Advances in Structural Dynamics and Earthquake Engineering”.

The increasing need for housing and infrastructures with the exponential population growth, especially in seismic-prone areas, raises the need to have earthquake-resistant structures.

The objective of this Special Issue is to bring together the most recent research trends and advances in structural dynamics and earthquake engineering to support the needs of professionals and researchers engaged in civil structures and infrastructures under a variety of external actions such as earthquakes, wind, vibrations, and extreme loads.

This Special Issue can serve as a source of high-impact publications for the global community of researchers in the traditional, as well as emerging, subdisciplines of structural dynamics and earthquake engineering.

Contributions in the following topics are welcome (but they need not be limited to this list):

  • Effects of dynamic loads on structures (earthquakes, wind, vibrations, extreme loads, etc.);
  • Linear and nonlinear methods of dynamic structural analysis;
  • Seismic response of buildings, bridges and other structures;
  • Seismic isolation of structures;
  • Passive vibration control strategies to mitigate the dynamic response of structures (tuned mass dampers, etc.);
  • Passive and active systems for earthquake protection;
  • Dynamic soil–structure interaction (SSI);
  • Investigation of earthquake-induced pounding between adjacent structures;
  • Methods for earthquake-resistant design and retrofit of structures;
  • Assessment, repair, and strengthening of existing structures, including historic structures and monuments;
  • Soil dynamics and foundations under seismic loads.

Prof. Dr. Denise-Penelope N. Kontoni
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Infrastructures is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1600 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • structural dynamics
  • earthquake engineering
  • dynamic structural analysis
  • seismic response of buildings, bridges and other structures
  • seismic isolation of structures
  • seismic mitigation
  • structural vibration control
  • damper device
  • tuned mass damper
  • passive and active systems for earthquake protection
  • dynamic soil–structure interaction (SSI)
  • earthquake-induced structural pounding
  • earthquake-resistant structures
  • seismic design and assessment of structures
  • repair and strengthening of structures
  • soil dynamics
  • foundations under seismic loads

Published Papers (7 papers)

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Research

Article
First Level Pre- and Post-Earthquake Building Seismic Assessment Protocol Based on Dynamic Characteristics Extracted In Situ
Infrastructures 2022, 7(9), 115; https://doi.org/10.3390/infrastructures7090115 - 31 Aug 2022
Viewed by 359
Abstract
The present work is concerned with the introduction of a new first level pre- and post-earthquake seismic assessment protocol for buildings that relies on the use of recorded structural response. As earthquakes represent a constant and unpredictable threat for the building stock around [...] Read more.
The present work is concerned with the introduction of a new first level pre- and post-earthquake seismic assessment protocol for buildings that relies on the use of recorded structural response. As earthquakes represent a constant and unpredictable threat for the building stock around the globe, the protocols already in use for assessing the risk should be revised and should also take into account the information hidden in data recorded in the field. Nowadays, data collection does not require expensive equipment and over-qualified personnel. In this direction, the proposed seismic assessment protocol aims to illustrate the ease of widely adopting Structural Health Monitoring (SHM) equipment (e.g., accelerographs), based on the work that has been carried out over the past years on subjects related to earthquake risk estimation. Building taxonomy and damage estimation, like those found in Hazus®–MH and other hazard assessment tools, can be enriched and modified properly to distinguish and classify the very earthquake-prone buildings from the others, and tag them for further assessment and rehabilitation as seismic codes suggest. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advances in Structural Dynamics and Earthquake Engineering)
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Article
On the Detection of Fracture within Vibrating Beams Traversed by a Moving Force
Infrastructures 2022, 7(7), 93; https://doi.org/10.3390/infrastructures7070093 - 18 Jul 2022
Viewed by 516
Abstract
In this work, we examine the influence of a crack in the span of a beam as it is being traversed by a point force with constant velocity. This problem presents two types of discontinuities: one spatial, where the crack is modelled as [...] Read more.
In this work, we examine the influence of a crack in the span of a beam as it is being traversed by a point force with constant velocity. This problem presents two types of discontinuities: one spatial, where the crack is modelled as a discontinuity in the slope of the deflection curve of the beam, and a temporal one, with the former derived as the point force moves forward in time. The aim is to interpret time signals registered at a given node on the beam, either during the forced vibration or the free vibration regimes, by using the Gabor transform of the transient beam response so as to observe a pattern that alludes to the location of the discontinuity. Three analytical methods are examined, namely eigenvalue extraction, Laplace transformation and the transform matrix technique. A numerical example is presented using the Laplace transformation, where it is possible to detect the location of damage during the traverse of a point force across the bridge span. Validation studies of the methodology presented here can be conducted in the future, either through field measurements or through experimental setups, which constitutes an important step in realizing applications in structural health monitoring of civil engineering infrastructure. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advances in Structural Dynamics and Earthquake Engineering)
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Article
Adverse Impact of Earthquake Seismic Loading on Angular Offset Tunnels and Effects of Isolation Grout
Infrastructures 2022, 7(7), 87; https://doi.org/10.3390/infrastructures7070087 - 23 Jun 2022
Viewed by 638
Abstract
This paper investigates the effects of seismic loads on tunnels in an attempt to provide better protection from earthquake shaking. Dynamic analysis of angular offset tunnels was performed, and the tunnels’ behavior under earthquake shaking and their response when using seismic isolation were [...] Read more.
This paper investigates the effects of seismic loads on tunnels in an attempt to provide better protection from earthquake shaking. Dynamic analysis of angular offset tunnels was performed, and the tunnels’ behavior under earthquake shaking and their response when using seismic isolation were analyzed in detail. The time history analysis was used to compute the stresses and deformation that develop in the tunnels during seismic events. Earthquake records with different frequency spectra were applied as seismic excitation to the twin tunnels. The excitation was applied normally to the tunnel axis, with peak ground accelerations of 0.10 g–0.30 g. The seismic event lasted 15 s, with a time step of 0.02 s utilized in the numerical analysis. Finite element modeling was employed to simulate the soil–tunnel interaction. Numerical models simulated twin tunnels passing through soft clay or stiff clay, with various earthquake records applied as seismic inputs. The effects of a silicon-based isolation material composed of silicon oil and fly-ash were compared with the use of traditional grout. The numerical model results show how seismic isolation affects the stresses and deformations that happen in tunnel bodies during earthquakes. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advances in Structural Dynamics and Earthquake Engineering)
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Article
Seismic Behavior of a Class of Mixed Reinforced Concrete-Steel Buildings Subjected to Near-Fault Motions
Infrastructures 2021, 6(12), 172; https://doi.org/10.3390/infrastructures6120172 - 05 Dec 2021
Viewed by 1077
Abstract
This paper investigates the seismic behavior of a class of mixed reinforced concrete-steel buildings. In particular, mixed buildings constructed by r/c (reinforced concrete) at their lower story(ies) and structural steel at their upper story(ies) are studied from the viewpoint of their wide application [...] Read more.
This paper investigates the seismic behavior of a class of mixed reinforced concrete-steel buildings. In particular, mixed buildings constructed by r/c (reinforced concrete) at their lower story(ies) and structural steel at their upper story(ies) are studied from the viewpoint of their wide application in engineering praxis. The need to investigate the seismic behavior for this type of mixed buildings arises from the fact that the existent literature is small and that modern seismic codes do not offer specific seismic design recommendations for them. To study the seismic behavior of mixed r/c-steel buildings, a 3-D numerical model is employed and five realistic r/c-steel mixed buildings are simulated. Two cases of the support condition, i.e., fixed or pinned, of the lowest steel story to the upper r/c one are examined. The r/c and steel parts of the mixed buildings are initially designed as separate structures by making use of the relevant seismic design guidelines of Eurocode 8, and then the seismic response of these buildings is computed through non-linear time-history analyses. The special category of near-fault seismic motions is selected in these time-history analyses to force the mixed r/c-steel buildings under study to exhibit a strong non-linear response. Seismic response indices in terms of inter-story drift ratio, residual inter-story drift ratio and peak floor absolute accelerations are computed. The maximum values of these indices are discussed by comparing the two aforementioned kinds of support conditions and checking the satisfaction of specific seismic performance limits. Conclusions regarding the expected seismic behavior of mixed r/c-steel buildings under near-fault seismic motions are drawn. Finally, the need to introduce specific design recommendations for mixed r/c-steel buildings in modern seismic codes is stressed. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advances in Structural Dynamics and Earthquake Engineering)
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Communication
Arbitrarily Oriented Phase Randomization of Design Ground Motions by Continuous Wavelets
Infrastructures 2021, 6(10), 144; https://doi.org/10.3390/infrastructures6100144 - 11 Oct 2021
Viewed by 465
Abstract
For dynamic analysis in seismic design, selection of input ground motions is of huge importance. In the presented scheme, complex Continuous Wavelet Transform (CWT) is utilized to simulate stochastic ground motions from historical records of earthquakes with phase disturbance arbitrarily localized in time-frequency [...] Read more.
For dynamic analysis in seismic design, selection of input ground motions is of huge importance. In the presented scheme, complex Continuous Wavelet Transform (CWT) is utilized to simulate stochastic ground motions from historical records of earthquakes with phase disturbance arbitrarily localized in time-frequency domain. The complex arguments of wavelet coefficients are determined as phase spectrum and an innovative formulation is constructed to improve computational efficiency of inverse wavelet transform with a pair of random complex arguments introduced and make more candidate wavelets available in the article. The proposed methodology is evaluated by numerical simulations on a two-degree-of-freedom system including spectral analysis and dynamic analysis with Shannon wavelet basis and Gabor wavelet basis. The result shows that the presented scheme enables time-frequency range of disturbance in time-frequency domain arbitrarily oriented and complex Shannon wavelet basis is verified as the optimal candidate mother wavelet for the procedure in case of frequency information maintenance with phase perturbation. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advances in Structural Dynamics and Earthquake Engineering)
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Article
Assessment of the Seismic Response of CLT Shear Walls Using the EEGBW, a Bouc–Wen Class Predictive Model
Infrastructures 2021, 6(4), 55; https://doi.org/10.3390/infrastructures6040055 - 06 Apr 2021
Cited by 3 | Viewed by 773
Abstract
The paper presents an application of the Extended Energy-dependent Generalized Bouc–Wen model (EEGBW) to simulate the experimental cyclic response of Cross-Laminated Timber (CLT) panels. The main objectives of the paper are assessing the sensitivity of the quadratic error between experimental and numerical data [...] Read more.
The paper presents an application of the Extended Energy-dependent Generalized Bouc–Wen model (EEGBW) to simulate the experimental cyclic response of Cross-Laminated Timber (CLT) panels. The main objectives of the paper are assessing the sensitivity of the quadratic error between experimental and numerical data to the EEGBW parameters, showing the fitting performance of the EEGBW model in matching the experimental cyclic response of CLT panels, highlighting the stability of the model in nonlinear dynamic analysis with seismic excitation. The research proves that the considered Bouc–Wen class hysteresis model can reproduce the hysteretic response of structural arrangements characterized by pinching and degradation phenomena. The model exhibits significant stability in nonlinear dynamic analysis with seismic excitation. The model’s stability and versatility endorse its application to simulate structural systems’ dynamic response when Finite Element modelling might be an impractical choice. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advances in Structural Dynamics and Earthquake Engineering)
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Graphical abstract

Article
Effect of Lintel Beam on Seismic Response of Reinforced Concrete Buildings with Semi-Interlocked and Unreinforced Brick Masonry Infills
Infrastructures 2021, 6(1), 6; https://doi.org/10.3390/infrastructures6010006 - 01 Jan 2021
Cited by 6 | Viewed by 2217
Abstract
The primary focus of this study is to evaluate the nonlinear response of reinforced concrete (RC) frames with two types of brick infills viz., unreinforced brick masonry infill (URM) and semi-interlocked brick masonry infill (SIM) together with lintel beams, subjected to seismic loads. [...] Read more.
The primary focus of this study is to evaluate the nonlinear response of reinforced concrete (RC) frames with two types of brick infills viz., unreinforced brick masonry infill (URM) and semi-interlocked brick masonry infill (SIM) together with lintel beams, subjected to seismic loads. The seismic response is quantified in terms of response reduction factor and base shear. Infill walls are modeled using double strut nonlinear cyclic element. Nonlinear static adaptive pushover analysis is performed in the finite element program SeismoStruct. The response reduction factor (R) is computed from adaptive pushover analysis and performance for all models is obtained. The results showed that the average R factor of the RC framed structure with semi-interlocked masonry (SIM) is 1.31 times higher than the RC frame with unreinforced masonry (URM) infill. The R value of the bare frame with the lintel beam is found to be less than the corresponding value recommended in the Indian Standard Code. The results obtained in this study highlight that if the impacts of lintel beams and various brick infill scenarios are considered in the RC frames then the R values used for the design of RC frame buildings with infills would be underestimated (i.e., the evaluated R values are greater than the R values used for the design purpose). Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advances in Structural Dynamics and Earthquake Engineering)
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Planned Papers

The below list represents only planned manuscripts. Some of these manuscripts have not been received by the Editorial Office yet. Papers submitted to MDPI journals are subject to peer-review.

Title: Operational Model Analysis of Historical Buildings and Fem Model Updating Using Α Laser Scanning Vibrometer
Authors: Costas P. Providakis, Maria G. Mousteraki and Georgia Providaki
Affiliation: 1 Applied Mechanics & Strength of Materials Lab, School of Architecture, Technical University of Crete, GR-73100, Chania, Greece.; [email protected] 2 School of Architecture, Technical University of Crete, GR-73100, Chania, Greece.
Abstract: The present paper focuses on the application of a new structural health monitoring technique (SHM) which uses a Laser Scanning Doppler Vibrometer (LSDV) to evaluate the operational modal analysis characteristics of historical buildings in combination with an updating procedure to optimize their finite element models. The LSDV method is a remote and non-contact method to measure the time-dependent velocity variations of a specific point on the inspected building. In the field of historical buildings LSDV has been implemented in very limited applications mainly contributed to the assessment of the dynamic building characteristics in masonry wall specimens. Present study focuses on the application of LSDV method in operational modal analysis and monitoring of the dynamic response of historical stone masonry buildings and the evaluation of changes which are emerged when damage occur. To optimize the evaluation of mechanical dynamic characteristics of the building a finite element (FEM) updating technique based on frequency matching is developed. Results of the present work provide adequate evidence that the proposed SHM technique can efficiently reveal the modal response characteristics of a historical stone masonry building while, at the same time, optimize its finite element model for further evaluation of its mechanical dynamic characteristics.

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