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Regenerative Medicine: Role of Stem Cells and Innovative Biomaterials 3.0

A special issue of International Journal of Molecular Sciences (ISSN 1422-0067). This special issue belongs to the section "Materials Science".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (30 November 2022) | Viewed by 11560

Special Issue Editors


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Guest Editor
Department of Translational Biomedicine and Neuroscience - DiBraiN, University of Bari "Aldo Moro", 70124 Bari, Italy
Interests: regenerative medicine; stem cells; organoids; translational medicine; tumoroids; in-vitro disease models; tissue engineering; precision medicine; dentistry; medicine; oral pathology; organ regeneration
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Guest Editor
Department Translational Medicine, University of Ferrara, 44121 Ferrara, Italy
Interests: tissue engineering; regenerative medicine; 3D printing; stem cells; exosomes; biomaterials
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

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Guest Editor

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

This Special Issue is a continuation of our previous Special Issue, “Regenerative Medicine: Role of Stem Cells and Innovative Biomaterials”.

Regenerative medicine is a growing area of the medical sciences that has the unique peculiarity of involving both biological pathways and clinical applications. Currently, the main actors in tissue regeneration are stem cells and biomaterials. The proper combination of these factors is the key to successfully treating damaged or lost tissues, promoting tissue formation, and simultaneously restoring aesthetics and function. Future regenerative strategies will be aimed at developing innovative biologically friendly and smart biomaterials, as well as at triggering stem cells towards specific lineages in clinical-grade conditions, including through the use of MSC-derived conditioned medium, exosomes or small molecules. The next approaches should overcome the current biological and clinical limitations and be able to use those autologous factors that can naïvely induce and promote the biological conditions that could guide and improve any kind of tissue regeneration. The biomedical applications of innovative coatings or functionalized surfaces have recently boosted the theranostic use of novel biomaterials. This Special Issue will highlight the most promising applications of tissue engineering in the future diagnostic and therapeutic procedures applied to the medical sciences.

Prof. Dr. Marco Tatullo
Prof. Dr. Barbara Zavan
Prof. Dr. Adriano Piattelli
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

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Keywords

  • regenerative medicine
  • biomaterials
  • scaffolds
  • stem cells
  • smart materials
  • exosomes
  • functionalized surfaces
  • coatings
  • bioactive surfaces
  • theranostics

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Published Papers (5 papers)

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Editorial

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2 pages, 178 KiB  
Editorial
Regenerative Medicine: Role of Stem Cells and Innovative Biomaterials 2.0
by Marco Tatullo, Adriano Piattelli and Barbara Zavan
Int. J. Mol. Sci. 2022, 23(8), 4199; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijms23084199 - 11 Apr 2022
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 1504
Abstract
Regenerative medicine has constantly increased its field of influence over the last few years [...] Full article

Research

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11 pages, 6312 KiB  
Article
Anticoagulant Properties of Coated Fe-Pd Ferromagnetic Shape Memory Ribbons
by Alexander Bunge, Alexandru Chiriac, Mihaela Sofronie, Izabell Crăciunescu, Alin Sebastian Porav and Rodica Turcu
Int. J. Mol. Sci. 2023, 24(3), 2452; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijms24032452 - 26 Jan 2023
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 1323
Abstract
Shape memory alloys, especially ferromagnetic shape memory alloys, are interesting new materials for the manufacturing of stents. Iron–palladium alloys in particular can be used to manufacture self-expanding temporary stents due to their optimum rate of degradation, which is between that of magnesium and [...] Read more.
Shape memory alloys, especially ferromagnetic shape memory alloys, are interesting new materials for the manufacturing of stents. Iron–palladium alloys in particular can be used to manufacture self-expanding temporary stents due to their optimum rate of degradation, which is between that of magnesium and pure iron, two metals commonly used in temporary stent research. In order to avoid blood clotting upon the introduction of the stent, they are often coated with anticoagulants. In this study, sulfated pectin, a heparin mimetic, was synthesized in different ways and used as coating on multiple iron–palladium alloys. The static and dynamic prothrombin time (PT) and activated partial thromboplastin time (APTT) of the prepared materials were compared to samples uncoated or coated with polyethylene glycol. While no large differences were observed in the prothrombin time measurements, the activated partial thromboplastin time increased significantly with all alloys coated with sulfated pectin. Aside from that, sulfated pectin synthesized by different methods also caused slight changes in the activated partial thromboplastin time. These findings show that iron–palladium alloys can be coated with anticoagulants to improve their utility as material for temporary stents. Sulfated pectin was characterized by nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and Fourier-transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy, and the coated alloys by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and energy dispersive X-ray analysis (EDX). Full article
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14 pages, 2227 KiB  
Article
Biological Cover Mitigates Disruption of the Dermal Structure in Mechanically Expanded Skin in a Porcine Model
by Joanna K. Ledwon, Sarah A. Applebaum, Bianka Progri, Oveyaa Vignesh, Kristof S. Gutowski, Alec B. Chang, Adrian B. Tepole and Arun K. Gosain
Int. J. Mol. Sci. 2022, 23(21), 13091; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijms232113091 - 28 Oct 2022
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 1950
Abstract
Tissue expansion is an integral procedure of the vast majority of breast reconstruction and has a significant impact on the final clinical outcomes. Therefore, technological advances leading to a fewer number of unfavorable outcomes and a decrease in complication rates are imperative. In [...] Read more.
Tissue expansion is an integral procedure of the vast majority of breast reconstruction and has a significant impact on the final clinical outcomes. Therefore, technological advances leading to a fewer number of unfavorable outcomes and a decrease in complication rates are imperative. In this study, using a porcine model, we investigated an effect of acellular dermal matrix (ADM) used as a tissue expander cover on the dermal changes induced by mechanical forces during tissue expansion. After 14 days of expansion, skin samples were collected from one animal, while the second animal underwent radiation, and tissue was collected 8 weeks later. Tissue expanded without the use of ADM and unexpanded skin served as the controls. Collected skin biopsies were used for histological and immunohistochemical evaluation, and for gene expression analysis. We revealed that the biological cover incorporation into host tissue is facilitated by macrophages without inducing a broad inflammatory response. The utilization of ADM mitigated disruption in the dermal structure, excessive collagen deposition, and capsule formation in non-irradiated expanded skin. The protective effect was not fully maintained in irradiated skin. These results demonstrate that tissue expansion might be improved by using the tissue expander cover. Full article
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Review

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20 pages, 2330 KiB  
Review
Magnetic Nanostructures and Stem Cells for Regenerative Medicine, Application in Liver Diseases
by Tatiane Barreto da Silva, Evellyn Araújo Dias, Liana Monteiro da Fonseca Cardoso, Jaciara Fernanda Gomes Gama, Luiz Anastácio Alves and Andrea Henriques-Pons
Int. J. Mol. Sci. 2023, 24(11), 9293; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijms24119293 - 26 May 2023
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 2400
Abstract
The term “liver disease” refers to any hepatic condition that leads to tissue damage or altered hepatic function and can be induced by virus infections, autoimmunity, inherited genetic mutations, high consumption of alcohol or drugs, fat accumulation, and cancer. Some types of liver [...] Read more.
The term “liver disease” refers to any hepatic condition that leads to tissue damage or altered hepatic function and can be induced by virus infections, autoimmunity, inherited genetic mutations, high consumption of alcohol or drugs, fat accumulation, and cancer. Some types of liver diseases are becoming more frequent worldwide. This can be related to increasing rates of obesity in developed countries, diet changes, higher alcohol intake, and even the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic was associated with increased liver disease-related deaths. Although the liver can regenerate, in cases of chronic damage or extensive fibrosis, the recovery of tissue mass is impossible, and a liver transplant is indicated. Because of reduced organ availability, it is necessary to search for alternative bioengineered solutions aiming for a cure or increased life expectancy while a transplant is not possible. Therefore, several groups were studying the possibility of stem cells transplantation as a therapeutic alternative since it is a promising strategy in regenerative medicine for treating various diseases. At the same time, nanotechnological advances can contribute to specifically targeting transplanted cells to injured sites using magnetic nanoparticles. In this review, we summarize multiple magnetic nanostructure-based strategies that are promising for treating liver diseases. Full article
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31 pages, 2184 KiB  
Review
The Application of Biomaterials in Spinal Cord Injury
by Chi Feng, Lan Deng, Yuan-Yuan Yong, Jian-Ming Wu, Da-Lian Qin, Lu Yu, Xiao-Gang Zhou and An-Guo Wu
Int. J. Mol. Sci. 2023, 24(1), 816; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijms24010816 - 3 Jan 2023
Cited by 13 | Viewed by 3684
Abstract
The spinal cord and the brain form the central nervous system (CNS), which is the most important part of the body. However, spinal cord injury (SCI) caused by external forces is one of the most difficult types of neurological injury to treat, resulting [...] Read more.
The spinal cord and the brain form the central nervous system (CNS), which is the most important part of the body. However, spinal cord injury (SCI) caused by external forces is one of the most difficult types of neurological injury to treat, resulting in reduced or even absent motor, sensory and autonomic functions. It leads to the reduction or even disappearance of motor, sensory and self-organizing nerve functions. Currently, its incidence is increasing each year worldwide. Therefore, the development of treatments for SCI is urgently needed in the clinic. To date, surgery, drug therapy, stem cell transplantation, regenerative medicine, and rehabilitation therapy have been developed for the treatment of SCI. Among them, regenerative biomaterials that use tissue engineering and bioscaffolds to transport cells or drugs to the injured site are considered the most promising option. In this review, we briefly introduce SCI and its molecular mechanism and summarize the application of biomaterials in the repair and regeneration of tissue in various models of SCI. However, there is still limited evidence about the treatment of SCI with biomaterials in the clinic. Finally, this review will provide inspiration and direction for the future study and application of biomaterials in the treatment of SCI. Full article
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