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Topical Collection "Precision Medicine—From Bench to Bedside"

Editor

Guest Editor
Dr. William Chi-shing Cho

Queen Elizabeth Hospital, Hong Kong, China
E-Mail
Interests: cancer biomarker; chinese medicine; diabetes mellitus; evidence-based medicine; genomics; microRNA; molecular diagnostics; nasopharyngeal carcinoma; non-small cell lung cancer; proteomics

Topical Collection Information

Dear Colleagues,

In the personalized medicine era, human diseases are further classified into subtypes accordingly to the molecular portrait. Characteristics of certain gene(s) and cluster of genes/proteins will have better prediction on the prone of the disease, treatment response and prognosis.

In this Topical Collection, we focus, particularly, on how precision medicine can be applied from bench to bedside. After all, accurate diagnosis and prescribing right drug and right treatment to the right patient is a common goal of healthcare professionals in providing prevention and effective treatments.

We welcome original papers and review articles that focus on the latest advances of precision medicine. The following key areas are covered but not exclusive:

  • Genetic variant of human diseases in precision medicine
  • Examples of precision medicine in human disease treatment and prevention
  • Application of Omics technologies in precision medicine
  • Application of big data analysis in precision medicine
  • Molecular imaging for precision medicine
  • Tools employed in precision medicine, including molecular diagnostics, analytics and software
  • The application of panomic analysis and systems biology for precision medicine
  • Precision oncology
  • Using molecular pathological epidemiology to identify potential biomarkers for precision medicine
  • Extending precision medicine principles into basic science research and biomedical information technology activities

Dr. William Chi-Shing Cho
Collection Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the collection website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. International Journal of Molecular Sciences is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1800 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Related Special Issue

Published Papers (4 papers)

2018

Jump to: 2017

Open AccessArticle
Prognostic Value of RNASEH2A-, CDK1-, and CD151-Related Pathway Gene Profiling for Kidney Cancers
Int. J. Mol. Sci. 2018, 19(6), 1586; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijms19061586
Received: 17 April 2018 / Revised: 17 May 2018 / Accepted: 22 May 2018 / Published: 28 May 2018
Cited by 1 | PDF Full-text (26427 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text | Supplementary Files
Abstract
The nucleotide degrading enzyme gene RNASEH2A (ribonuclease H2 subunit A) has been found to be overexpressed in cancers. Our aim was to understand the role of RNASEH2A in cancer prognostication and to establish a scoring system based on the expressions of genes interacting [...] Read more.
The nucleotide degrading enzyme gene RNASEH2A (ribonuclease H2 subunit A) has been found to be overexpressed in cancers. Our aim was to understand the role of RNASEH2A in cancer prognostication and to establish a scoring system based on the expressions of genes interacting with RNASEH2A. We screened the nucleotide degrading enzyme gene expression in RNAseq data of 14 cancer types derived from The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) and found that RNASEH2A overexpression was associated with poor patient survival only in renal cell carcinomas (RCCs). Further cluster analyses of samples with poor outcomes revealed that cluster of differentiation 151 (CD151) upregulation correlated with low cyclin dependent kinase 1 (CDK1) and high RNASEH2A expression. The combination of low CD151 expression and high RNASEH2A expression resulted in impaired proliferation in four kidney cancer cell lines, suggesting potential synthetic dosage lethality (SDL) interactions between the two genes. A prognostication scoring system was established based on the expression levels of RNASEH2A-, CDK1-, and CD151-related genes, which could effectively predict the overall survival in a TCGA clear cell RCC cohort (n = 533, 995.3 versus 2242.2 days, p < 0.0001), in another clear cell renal cell carcinoma (ccRCC) cohort E-GEOD-22541 (n = 44, 390.0 versus 1889.2 days, p = 0.0007), and in a TCGA papillary RCC (pRCC) cohort (n = 287, 741.6 versus 1623.7 days, p < 0.0001). Our results provide a clinically applicable prognostication scoring system for renal cancers. Full article
Figures

Figure 1

2017

Jump to: 2018

Open AccessArticle
Identification of Circulating miRNAs Differentially Regulated by Opioid Treatment
Int. J. Mol. Sci. 2017, 18(9), 1991; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijms18091991
Received: 31 August 2017 / Revised: 12 September 2017 / Accepted: 13 September 2017 / Published: 16 September 2017
Cited by 7 | PDF Full-text (3431 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Emerging evidence demonstrates functional contributions of microRNAs (miRNAs) to μ-opioid receptor (MOR) signaling, but the information so far has been mostly limited to their intracellular regulatory mechanisms. The present study aimed to investigate changes in plasma miRNA profiles elicited by opioid treatment in [...] Read more.
Emerging evidence demonstrates functional contributions of microRNAs (miRNAs) to μ-opioid receptor (MOR) signaling, but the information so far has been mostly limited to their intracellular regulatory mechanisms. The present study aimed to investigate changes in plasma miRNA profiles elicited by opioid treatment in blood samples collected from clinical studies. Healthy male subjects were orally administered with hydromorphone or oxycodone and blood samples were collected at a specified time after the drug treatment. A total of 179 plasma miRNAs were measured using multiplex qRT-PCR. Nine and seventeen miRNAs were commonly upregulated (let-7a-5p, miR-423-3p, miR-199a-3p, miR-146a-5p, miR-23b-3p, miR-24-3p, miR-221-3p, miR-223-3p, and miR-146b-5p) and downregulated (miR-144-3p, miR-215, miR-363-3p, etc.), respectively, following opioid treatment. The MOR signaling-associated miRNAs, namely let-7 family miRNAs (i.e., let-7d-5p, let-7f-5p, let-7c, let-7e-5p), miR-103a-3p, miR-339-3p, miR-146a-5p, miR-23b-3p, miR-23a-3p, and miR-181a-5p, were differentially expressed following drug treatment. These differentially expressed miRNAs are circulating biomarker candidates that can be used to evaluate MOR stimulation and serve as novel clinical diagnostic tools for improving clinical outcomes. Full article
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Graphical abstract

Open AccessArticle
Magnetically Bioprinted Human Myometrial 3D Cell Rings as A Model for Uterine Contractility
Int. J. Mol. Sci. 2017, 18(4), 683; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijms18040683
Received: 8 March 2017 / Revised: 14 March 2017 / Accepted: 16 March 2017 / Published: 23 March 2017
Cited by 8 | PDF Full-text (2418 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text | Supplementary Files
Abstract
Deregulation in uterine contractility can cause common pathological disorders of the female reproductive system, including preterm labor, infertility, inappropriate implantation, and irregular menstrual cycle. A better understanding of human myometrium contractility is essential to designing and testing interventions for these important clinical problems. [...] Read more.
Deregulation in uterine contractility can cause common pathological disorders of the female reproductive system, including preterm labor, infertility, inappropriate implantation, and irregular menstrual cycle. A better understanding of human myometrium contractility is essential to designing and testing interventions for these important clinical problems. Robust studies on the physiology of human uterine contractions require in vitro models, utilizing a human source. Importantly, uterine contractility is a three-dimensionally (3D)-coordinated phenomenon and should be studied in a 3D environment. Here, we propose and assess for the first time a 3D in vitro model for the evaluation of human uterine contractility. Magnetic 3D bioprinting is applied to pattern human myometrium cells into rings, which are then monitored for contractility over time and as a function of various clinically relevant agents. Commercially available and patient-derived myometrium cells were magnetically bioprinted into rings in 384-well formats for throughput uterine contractility analysis. The bioprinted uterine rings from various cell origins and patients show different patterns of contractility and respond differently to clinically relevant uterine contractility inhibitors, indomethacin and nifedipine. We believe that the novel system will serve as a useful tool to evaluate the physiology of human parturition while enabling high-throughput testing of multiple agents and conditions. Full article
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Graphical abstract

Open AccessReview
Bioinformatics Approaches for Fetal DNA Fraction Estimation in Noninvasive Prenatal Testing
Int. J. Mol. Sci. 2017, 18(2), 453; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijms18020453
Received: 18 January 2017 / Revised: 9 February 2017 / Accepted: 11 February 2017 / Published: 20 February 2017
Cited by 17 | PDF Full-text (475 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
The discovery of cell-free fetal DNA molecules in plasma of pregnant women has created a paradigm shift in noninvasive prenatal testing (NIPT). Circulating cell-free DNA in maternal plasma has been increasingly recognized as an important proxy to detect fetal abnormalities in a noninvasive [...] Read more.
The discovery of cell-free fetal DNA molecules in plasma of pregnant women has created a paradigm shift in noninvasive prenatal testing (NIPT). Circulating cell-free DNA in maternal plasma has been increasingly recognized as an important proxy to detect fetal abnormalities in a noninvasive manner. A variety of approaches for NIPT using next-generation sequencing have been developed, which have been rapidly transforming clinical practices nowadays. In such approaches, the fetal DNA fraction is a pivotal parameter governing the overall performance and guaranteeing the proper clinical interpretation of testing results. In this review, we describe the current bioinformatics approaches developed for estimating the fetal DNA fraction and discuss their pros and cons. Full article
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Graphical abstract

Int. J. Mol. Sci. EISSN 1422-0067 Published by MDPI AG, Basel, Switzerland RSS E-Mail Table of Contents Alert
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