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Special Issue "Challenges, Opportunities, and Innovation in Local Drug Delivery"

A special issue of International Journal of Molecular Sciences (ISSN 1422-0067). This special issue belongs to the section "Materials Science".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 30 September 2021.

Special Issue Editors

Prof. Dr. Bice Conti
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Drug Sciences, Lab. Pharmaceutical Technology and Law (PT&L), University of Pavia, Pavia, Italy
Interests: drug delivery; polymer nanoparticles; microspheres; biodegradable polymers; thermosensitive hydrogels; 3D bioprinting; tissue regeneration
Special Issues and Collections in MDPI journals
Prof. Dr. Ida Genta
E-Mail Website1 Website2
Guest Editor
Department of Drug Sciences, University of Pavia, Viale Taramelli 12, 27100 Pavia, Italy
Interests: drug delivery; polymer nanoparticles; microspheres; biodegradable polymers; thermosensitive hydrogel; 3D bioprinting; tissue regeneration
Special Issues and Collections in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Drug delivery is well known to be an opportunity for improving the efficacy and safety of challenging active agents such as those with solubility or toxicity constraints. It broadly refers to approaches, formulations, technologies, and systems for delivering an active agent into the body, also targeting a specific organ or tissue. In this area, local drug delivery systems represent a way to circumvent systemic drug delivery improving site-specific targeted therapies and escaping side effects. Local drug delivery systems can be fabricated from biocompatible and biodegradable materials, exploiting innovative technologies such as electrospinning or microfluidics. The following are some examples: i) electrospun grafts and scaffolds for tissue regeneration loaded with anti-infective, anti-inflammatory drugs, or growth factors, that can improve and speed up tissue regeneration while reducing infection risk, ii) hydrogel and thermosensitive hydrogel-based nanoparticulate drug delivery systems, that offer unique opportunities to locally deliver drugs, i.e., to osteoarthritic joints or an injured spinal cord, and iii) chemotherapeutic loaded stimuli-responsive implantable materials for cancer therapy.

This Special Issue welcomes original research and reviews in this field, with a focus on all aspects of design, characterization, evaluation, and development of novel drug delivery systems for local drug delivery improving and innovating local therapies and tissue regeneration.

Prof. Dr. Bice Conti
Prof. Dr. Ida Genta
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. International Journal of Molecular Sciences is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. There is an Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal. For details about the APC please see here. Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • drug delivery
  • nanomedicine
  • biodegradable polymers
  • stimuli-responsive polymers
  • nanoparticles
  • nanofibers
  • electrospinning
  • 3D-printing

Published Papers (1 paper)

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Review

Review
Achievements in Thermosensitive Gelling Systems for Rectal Administration
Int. J. Mol. Sci. 2021, 22(11), 5500; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijms22115500 - 23 May 2021
Viewed by 340
Abstract
Rectal drug delivery is an effective alternative to oral and parenteral treatments. This route allows for both local and systemic drug therapy. Traditional rectal dosage formulations have historically been used for localised treatments, including laxatives, hemorrhoid therapy and antipyretics. However, this form of [...] Read more.
Rectal drug delivery is an effective alternative to oral and parenteral treatments. This route allows for both local and systemic drug therapy. Traditional rectal dosage formulations have historically been used for localised treatments, including laxatives, hemorrhoid therapy and antipyretics. However, this form of drug dosage often feels alien and uncomfortable to a patient, encouraging refusal. The limitations of conventional solid suppositories can be overcome by creating a thermosensitive liquid suppository. Unfortunately, there are currently only a few studies describing their use in therapy. However, recent trends indicate an increase in the development of this modern therapeutic system. This review introduces a novel rectal drug delivery system with the goal of summarising recent developments in thermosensitive liquid suppositories for analgesic, anticancer, antiemetic, antihypertensive, psychiatric, antiallergic, anaesthetic, antimalarial drugs and insulin. The report also presents the impact of various types of components and their concentration on the properties of this rectal dosage form. Further research into such formulations is certainly needed in order to meet the high demand for modern, efficient rectal gelling systems. Continued research and development in this field would undoubtedly further reveal the hidden potential of rectal drug delivery systems. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Challenges, Opportunities, and Innovation in Local Drug Delivery)
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