Special Issue "Applications of Photogrammetry for Environmental Research"

A special issue of ISPRS International Journal of Geo-Information (ISSN 2220-9964).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (31 August 2019).

Special Issue Editors

Guest Editor
Dr. Francesco Mancini Website E-Mail
University of Modena and Reggio Emilia, Department of Engineering 'Enzo Ferrari', Modena, Italy
Interests: geomatics engineering; geosciences; natural hazards assessment
Guest Editor
Dr. Riccardo Salvini Website E-Mail
University of Siena, Department of Environment, Earth and Physical Sciences and Centre of Geotechnologies, Italy
Interests: geological applications of remote sensing; digital photogrammetry; Global Positioning Systems (GPS); laser scanning; geo-monitoring

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

This Special Issue aims to collect papers showing the progress in key areas of photogrammetry for environmental research. Papers focused on airborne, terrestrial, and unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV) photogrammetry for a wide range of environmental applications are welcome. Submitted manuscripts should mainly focus on novelties introduced by recent approaches of photogrammetry to the understanding and assessment of environmental phenomena and processes at required spatial scales. In particular, papers are expected to address the following topics:

  • - Terrestrial photogrammetry for monitoring purposes;
  • - UAV photogrammetry to model/assess environmental phenomena at fine spatial scale;
  • - Photogrammetry for disasters prevention, monitoring, and management;
  • - Processing strategies of multi-temporal datasets;
  • - Integration between optical and multispectral/laser data;
  • - Methodologies for real-time mapping and monitoring;
  • - Change detection and deformation analysis based on photogrammetric dataset
  • - Investigation of natural or anthropogenic phenomena supported by terrestrial/aerial photogrammetry
  • - Novel uses of proximity surveys to geography, geomorphology, geotechnologies, landscape description, coastal studies, archaeology, etc.

Finally, all papers should introduce thorough applications of the proposed approach/methodology to demonstrate the usefulness of terrestrial/aerial photogrammetry for environmental research.

Dr. Francesco Mancini
Dr. Riccardo Salvini
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. ISPRS International Journal of Geo-Information is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1000 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • photogrammetry for monitoring
  • UAV photogrammetry for environmental research
  • photogrammetry for disasters prevention, monitoring, and management
  • photogrammetry for real-time mapping
  • change detection
  • multi-temporal investigation

Published Papers (6 papers)

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Research

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Open AccessArticle
Application of Remote Sensing Data for Evaluation of Rockfall Potential within a Quarry Slope
ISPRS Int. J. Geo-Inf. 2019, 8(9), 367; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijgi8090367 - 22 Aug 2019
Abstract
In recent years data acquisition from remote sensing has become readily available to the quarry sector. This study demonstrates how such data may be used to evaluate and back analyse rockfall potential of a legacy slope in a blocky rock mass. Use of [...] Read more.
In recent years data acquisition from remote sensing has become readily available to the quarry sector. This study demonstrates how such data may be used to evaluate and back analyse rockfall potential of a legacy slope in a blocky rock mass. Use of data obtained from several aerial LiDAR (Light Detection and Ranging) and photogrammetric campaigns taken over a number of years (2011 to date) provides evidence for potential rockfall evolution from a slope within an active quarry operation in Cornwall, UK. Further investigation, through analysis of point cloud data obtained from terrestrial laser scanning, was undertaken to characterise the orientation of discontinuities present within the rock slope. Aerial and terrestrial LiDAR data were subsequently used for kinematic analysis, production of surface topography models and rockfall trajectory analyses using both 2D and 3D numerical simulations. The results of an Unmanned Aerial Vehicle (UAV)-based 3D photogrammetric analysis enabled the reconstruction of high resolution topography, allowing one to not only determine geometrical properties of the slope surface and geo-mechanical characterisation but provide data for validation of numerical simulations. The analysis undertaken shows the effectiveness of the existing rockfall barrier, while demonstrating how photogrammetric data can be used to inform back analyses of the underlying failure mechanism and investigate potential runout. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Applications of Photogrammetry for Environmental Research)
Open AccessArticle
SfM-MVS Photogrammetry for Rockfall Analysis and Hazard Assessment Along the Ancient Roman Via Flaminia Road at the Furlo Gorge (Italy)
ISPRS Int. J. Geo-Inf. 2019, 8(8), 325; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijgi8080325 - 25 Jul 2019
Abstract
Rockfall events represent significant hazards for areas characterized by high and steep slopes and therefore effective mitigation controls are essential to control their effect. There are a lot of examples all over the world of anthropic areas at risk because of their proximity [...] Read more.
Rockfall events represent significant hazards for areas characterized by high and steep slopes and therefore effective mitigation controls are essential to control their effect. There are a lot of examples all over the world of anthropic areas at risk because of their proximity to a rock slope. A rockfall runout analysis is a typical 3D problem, but for many years, because of the lack of specific software, powerful computers, and economic reasons, a 2D approach was normally adopted. However, in recent years the use of 3D software has become quite widespread and different runout working approaches have been developed. The contribution and potential use of photogrammetry in this context is undoubtedly great. This paper describes the application of a 3D hybrid working approach, which considers the integrated use of traditional geological methods, Terrestrial Laser Scanning, and drone based Digital Photogrammetry. Such approach was undertaken in order to perform the study of rockfall runout and geological hazard in a natural slope in Italy in correspondence of an archaeological area. Results show the rockfall hazard in the study area and highlights the importance of using photogrammetry for the correct and complete geometrical reconstruction of slope, joints, and block geometries, which is essential for the analysis and design of proper remediation measures. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Applications of Photogrammetry for Environmental Research)
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Open AccessArticle
The Suitability of UAS for Mass Movement Monitoring Caused by Torrential Rainfall—A Study on the Talus Cones in the Alpine Terrain in High Tatras, Slovakia
ISPRS Int. J. Geo-Inf. 2019, 8(8), 317; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijgi8080317 - 24 Jul 2019
Abstract
The prediction of landslides and other events associated with slope movement is a very serious issue in many national parks around the world. This article deals with the territory of the Malá Studená Dolina (Little Cold Valley, High Tatras National Park—Slovakia), where there [...] Read more.
The prediction of landslides and other events associated with slope movement is a very serious issue in many national parks around the world. This article deals with the territory of the Malá Studená Dolina (Little Cold Valley, High Tatras National Park—Slovakia), where there are extensive talus cones, through which seasonally heavy hiking trails lead. In the last few years particularly, there have been frequent falls and landslides in the mountainous environment, which also caused several fatal injuries in 2018. For the above reasons, efforts are being made to develop a methodology for monitoring the changes of the talus cones in this specific alpine area, to determine the size, speed, and character of the morphological changes of the soil. Non-contact methods of mass data collection (laser scanning with Leica P40 and aerial photogrammetry with unmanned aerial system (UAS) DJI Phantom 4 Pro) have been used. The results of these measurements were compared and the overall suitability of both methods for measurement in such terrain evaluated. The standard deviation of the difference of surface determination (represented by the point cloud) is about 0.03 m. As such accuracy is sufficient for the purpose of monitoring talus cones and the use of UAS is easier and associated with lower risk of damage of expensive equipment, we conclude that this method is more suitable for mapping and for repeated monitoring of such terrain. The properties of the outputs of the individual measurement methods, the degree of measurement difficulty and specific measurement conditions in the mountainous terrain, as well as the economy of the individual methods, are discussed in detail. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Applications of Photogrammetry for Environmental Research)
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Open AccessArticle
Diachronic UAV Photogrammetry of a Sandy Beach in Brittany (France) for a Long-Term Coastal Observatory
ISPRS Int. J. Geo-Inf. 2019, 8(6), 267; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijgi8060267 - 07 Jun 2019
Abstract
In the dual context of coastal hazard intensification and the growing number of stakes exposed to these hazards, coastal observatories are in demand to provide a structured framework dedicated to long-term monitoring. This article describes the drone-based photogrammetry monitoring performed since 2006 on [...] Read more.
In the dual context of coastal hazard intensification and the growing number of stakes exposed to these hazards, coastal observatories are in demand to provide a structured framework dedicated to long-term monitoring. This article describes the drone-based photogrammetry monitoring performed since 2006 on Porsmilin Beach (Brittany, France) in the framework of the DYNALIT (Littoral and Coastline Dynamics) observatory, focusing on data quality and the consistency of long-term time series under the influence of multiple technological evolutions: Unmanned Aerial Vehicles (UAV) platforms with the arrival of electric multirotor drones, processing tools with the development of structure-from-motion (SfM) photogrammetry, and operational modes of survey. A study case is presented to show the potential of UAV monitoring to study storm impacts and beach resilience. The relevance of high-accuracy monitoring is also highlighted. With the current method, an accuracy of 3 cm can be achieved on the digital elevation model (DEM) and the orthophotograph. The question of the representativity and frequency of DEM time points is raised. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Applications of Photogrammetry for Environmental Research)
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Open AccessArticle
Mapping Canopy Heights of Poplar Plantations in Plain Areas Using ZY3-02 Stereo and Multispectral Data
ISPRS Int. J. Geo-Inf. 2019, 8(3), 106; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijgi8030106 - 27 Feb 2019
Abstract
Forest canopy height plays an important role in forest management and ecosystem modeling. There are a variety of techniques employed to map forest height using remote sensing data but it is still necessary to explore the use of new data and methods. In [...] Read more.
Forest canopy height plays an important role in forest management and ecosystem modeling. There are a variety of techniques employed to map forest height using remote sensing data but it is still necessary to explore the use of new data and methods. In this study, we demonstrate an approach for mapping canopy heights of poplar plantations in plain areas through a combination of stereo and multispectral data from China’s latest civilian stereo mapping satellite ZY3-02. First, a digital surface model (DSM) was extracted using photogrammetry methods. Then, canopy samples and ground samples were selected through manual interpretation. Canopy height samples were obtained by calculating the DSM elevation differences between the canopy samples and ground samples. A regression model was used to correlate the reflectance of a ZY3-02 multispectral image with the canopy height samples, in which the red band and green band reflectance were selected as predictors. Finally, the model was extrapolated to the entire study area and a wall-to-wall forest canopy height map was obtained. The validation of the predicted canopy height map reported a coefficient of determination (R2) of 0.72 and a root mean square error (RMSE) of 1.58 m. This study demonstrates the capacity of ZY3-02 data for mapping the canopy height of pure plantations in plain areas. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Applications of Photogrammetry for Environmental Research)
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Review

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Open AccessFeature PaperReview
Application of Remote Sensing to the Investigation of Rock Slopes: Experience Gained and Lessons Learned
ISPRS Int. J. Geo-Inf. 2019, 8(7), 296; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijgi8070296 - 27 Jun 2019
Abstract
The stability and deformation behavior of high rock slopes depends on many factors, including geological structures, lithology, geomorphic processes, stress distribution, and groundwater regime. A comprehensive mapping program is, therefore, required to investigate and assess the stability of high rock slopes. However, slope [...] Read more.
The stability and deformation behavior of high rock slopes depends on many factors, including geological structures, lithology, geomorphic processes, stress distribution, and groundwater regime. A comprehensive mapping program is, therefore, required to investigate and assess the stability of high rock slopes. However, slope steepness, rockfalls and ongoing instability, difficult terrain, and other safety concerns may prevent the collection of data by means of traditional field techniques. Therefore, remote sensing methods are often critical to perform an effective investigation. In this paper, we describe the application of field and remote sensing approaches for the characterization of rock slopes at various scale and distances. Based on over 15 years of the experience gained by the Engineering Geology and Resource Geotechnics Research Group at Simon Fraser University (Vancouver, Canada), we provide a summary of the potential applications, advantages, and limitations of varied remote sensing techniques for comprehensive characterization of rock slopes. We illustrate how remote sensing methods have been critical in performing rock slope investigations. However, we observe that traditional field methods still remain indispensable to collect important intact rock and discontinuity condition data. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Applications of Photogrammetry for Environmental Research)
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