Special Issue "Intimate Partner Violence and Mental Health in Low- and Middle-Income Settings"

A special issue of International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health (ISSN 1660-4601). This special issue belongs to the section "Mental Health".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 15 September 2021.

Special Issue Editors

Prof. Dr. Lindsay Stark
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Brown School, Washington University in St. Louis, St. Louis, MO 63130, USA
Interests: violence prevention; gender based violence; child protection, mental health and psychosocial wellbeing; refugees and displaced populations
Dr. Emma Fulu
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
The Equality Institute, Melbourne, VIC 3070, Australia
Interests: violence prevention; gender-based violence; child abuse; masculinities; feminist movements; health and well-being; intersectionality; social norms
Dr. Ilana Seff
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Brown School, Washington University in St. Louis, St. Louis, MO 63130, USA
Interests: violence prevention; gender-based violence; social norms; mental health and psychosocial wellbeing; refugees and displaced populations; innovative measurement methods
Dr. Massy Mutumba
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Health Behavior and Biological Sciences, University of Michigan School of Nursing, Michigan 48109, USA
Interests: adolescent health and wellbeing; HIV & AIDS; mental health; sexual and reproductive health

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Intimate partner violence (IPV) poses a significant threat to the human rights, safety, and health of women and girls across the globe. Recent estimates suggest that approximately one-third of women globally have experienced physical or sexual IPV, though the risk of lifetime incidence can be as high as 40% in some regions. In addition to any physical or sexual injury sustained by survivors of IPV, research shows women who have experienced IPV are more likely to develop a range of mental health symptoms and disorders both at the time of abuse and later in life. Studies also outline a relationship between witnessing IPV in childhood and experiencing mental illness in adulthood. While these associations between IPV and mental health are well-evidenced in high-income countries, there is a dearth of evidence about this topic in low- and middle-income countries (LMICs) and humanitarian contexts. This Special Issue will help to fill this gap by elucidating the mechanistic pathways between witnessing, experiencing, and perpetrating IPV, and mental health, as well as by identifying strategies for successfully mitigating the negative mental health consequences of IPV in LMIC and humanitarian contexts.

Prof. Dr. Lindsay Stark
Dr. Emma Fulu
Dr. Ilana Seff
Dr. Massy Mutumba
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2300 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • intimate partner violence
  • domestic violence
  • spouse abuse
  • mental health
  • PTSD
  • depression
  • anxiety
  • psychosocial wellbeing
  • gender
  • LMICs
  • humanitarian

Published Papers (3 papers)

Order results
Result details
Select all
Export citation of selected articles as:

Research

Article
Attitudinal Acceptance of Intimate Partner Violence and Mental Health Outcomes for Female Survivors in Sub-Saharan Africa
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2021, 18(10), 5099; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph18105099 - 12 May 2021
Viewed by 398
Abstract
While current literature evidences a strong association between gender-based violence exposure and adverse mental health outcomes, few studies have explored how attitudinal acceptance of intimate partner violence (IPV) might impact this relationship. This analysis employed data from 13–24-year-old females as part of the [...] Read more.
While current literature evidences a strong association between gender-based violence exposure and adverse mental health outcomes, few studies have explored how attitudinal acceptance of intimate partner violence (IPV) might impact this relationship. This analysis employed data from 13–24-year-old females as part of the Violence Against Children Surveys in Nigeria, Uganda, and Malawi. Mental health status, defined by the Kessler Screening Scale for Psychological Distress, and suicide ideation served as outcome measures. Predictors of interest included lifetime experiences of IPV and attitudinal acceptance of IPV. Country-stratified logistic and ordinary least squares regressions were used to predict outcomes and included interactions between violence exposure and attitudinal acceptance of IPV. Violence exposure was associated with increased symptoms of mental distress and increased suicide ideation in all countries. Among those who experienced IPV, exhibiting attitudinal acceptance of IPV was associated with improved mental health in Nigeria and Malawi. IPV tolerance conferred lower odds of suicide ideation following IPV exposure in Nigeria. The findings suggest that programs aiming to reduce attitudinal acceptance of IPV must consider how these changes may interact with women’s exposure to IPV. Full article
Article
“I Go up to the Edge of the Valley, and I Talk to God”: Using Mixed Methods to Understand the Relationship between Gender-Based Violence and Mental Health among Lebanese and Syrian Refugee Women Engaged in Psychosocial Programming
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2021, 18(9), 4500; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph18094500 - 23 Apr 2021
Viewed by 715
Abstract
Lebanon’s intersecting economic and political crises exacerbate complex public health issues among both host and refugee populations. This mixed-methods study by a Lebanese service provider, in partnership with an international research institute, seeks to better understand how experiences of gender-based violence (GBV) and [...] Read more.
Lebanon’s intersecting economic and political crises exacerbate complex public health issues among both host and refugee populations. This mixed-methods study by a Lebanese service provider, in partnership with an international research institute, seeks to better understand how experiences of gender-based violence (GBV) and mental health intersect in the lives of Syrian and Lebanese women, and how to better meet these needs. It employs a randomized cross-sectional survey of 969 Abaad service users and focus groups with community members and service providers. There were significant associations between GBV and ill mental health; notably, respondents reporting transactional sex had 4 times the likelihood of severe distress (aOR 4.2; 95% CI 1.2–14.8; p ≤ 0.05). Focus groups emphasized less-visible forms of violence, such as emotional violence, and the importance of environmental factors in one’s ability to cope, noting “it always came back to the economy”. Recommendations include providing a more holistic and coordinated approach between GBV, mental health, livelihood, and basic assistance sectors; and sensitive, accessible, and higher-quality mental health services informed by GBV response actors’ experience putting in place survivor-centered programming and made available to both host and refugee community members. Full article
Article
A Latent Class Analysis of Gender Attitudes and Their Associations with Intimate Partner Violence and Mental Health in the Democratic Republic of Congo
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2021, 18(8), 4063; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph18084063 - 12 Apr 2021
Viewed by 665
Abstract
Gender role attitudes, views held by individuals regarding the roles men and women should play in society, are a powerful social determinant of health. However, work remains in elucidating the associations between gender attitudes and intimate partner violence (IPV) perpetration or victimization and [...] Read more.
Gender role attitudes, views held by individuals regarding the roles men and women should play in society, are a powerful social determinant of health. However, work remains in elucidating the associations between gender attitudes and intimate partner violence (IPV) perpetration or victimization and mental health problems. We used latent class analysis to classify patterns of responses on survey items on gender attitudes by male and female adults in households that participated in an economic empowerment intervention and evaluation in rural villages in the Democratic Republic of Congo. Attitudes about IPV and gender equality were two subdomains to emerge from analysis and a 3-class model solution was found to best fit response patterns. Results indicated that, as compared to the least gender equitable class, individuals in the moderately gender equitable and fully gender equitable classes had lower odds of having experienced or perpetrated psychological abuse. Individuals within the moderately gender equitable class were at lower odds of having experienced or perpetrated physical or sexual violence. Further, individuals in the moderately gender equitable and fully gender equitable classes had significantly lower mean scores on symptoms associated with PTSD than individuals in the least gender equitable class. Future research should explore the relationships between gender attitudes, partner violence and mental health to build resilient families. Full article

Planned Papers

The below list represents only planned manuscripts. Some of these manuscripts have not been received by the Editorial Office yet. Papers submitted to MDPI journals are subject to peer-review.

Title: Community-based Intimate Partner Abuse and Mental Health Interventions with Rohingya and Syrian Refugees 

Authors: James, L., Welton-Mitchell, C., Michael, S., Santoadi, F., Shakira, S., Hussin, H., Anwar, M., Kilzar, L., & James. A. 

 

Title: "I go up to the edge of the valley, and I talk to God”: Using mixed methods to understand the relationship between gender-based violence and mental health among Lebanese and Syrian Refugee women engaged in psychosocial programming

Authors: Barada, R., Potts, A., Bourassa, A., Contreras, J. M., Nasr, K

 

 

Back to TopTop