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Article

Attitudinal Acceptance of Intimate Partner Violence and Mental Health Outcomes for Female Survivors in Sub-Saharan Africa

1
Weill Cornell Medical College, 1300 York Avenue, New York, NY 10065, USA
2
George Warren Brown School, Washington University in St. Louis, Campus Box 1196, 1 Brookings Drive, St. Louis, MO 63130, USA
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editor: Paul B. Tchounwou
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2021, 18(10), 5099; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph18105099
Received: 13 April 2021 / Revised: 5 May 2021 / Accepted: 6 May 2021 / Published: 12 May 2021
While current literature evidences a strong association between gender-based violence exposure and adverse mental health outcomes, few studies have explored how attitudinal acceptance of intimate partner violence (IPV) might impact this relationship. This analysis employed data from 13–24-year-old females as part of the Violence Against Children Surveys in Nigeria, Uganda, and Malawi. Mental health status, defined by the Kessler Screening Scale for Psychological Distress, and suicide ideation served as outcome measures. Predictors of interest included lifetime experiences of IPV and attitudinal acceptance of IPV. Country-stratified logistic and ordinary least squares regressions were used to predict outcomes and included interactions between violence exposure and attitudinal acceptance of IPV. Violence exposure was associated with increased symptoms of mental distress and increased suicide ideation in all countries. Among those who experienced IPV, exhibiting attitudinal acceptance of IPV was associated with improved mental health in Nigeria and Malawi. IPV tolerance conferred lower odds of suicide ideation following IPV exposure in Nigeria. The findings suggest that programs aiming to reduce attitudinal acceptance of IPV must consider how these changes may interact with women’s exposure to IPV. View Full-Text
Keywords: mental health; sub-Saharan Africa; intimate partner violence; attitudes; suicide ideation; adolescents mental health; sub-Saharan Africa; intimate partner violence; attitudes; suicide ideation; adolescents
MDPI and ACS Style

Ibala, R.-M.; Seff, I.; Stark, L. Attitudinal Acceptance of Intimate Partner Violence and Mental Health Outcomes for Female Survivors in Sub-Saharan Africa. Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2021, 18, 5099. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph18105099

AMA Style

Ibala R-M, Seff I, Stark L. Attitudinal Acceptance of Intimate Partner Violence and Mental Health Outcomes for Female Survivors in Sub-Saharan Africa. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health. 2021; 18(10):5099. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph18105099

Chicago/Turabian Style

Ibala, Reine-Marcelle, Ilana Seff, and Lindsay Stark. 2021. "Attitudinal Acceptance of Intimate Partner Violence and Mental Health Outcomes for Female Survivors in Sub-Saharan Africa" International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health 18, no. 10: 5099. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph18105099

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