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Special Issue "Child Victimisation"

A special issue of International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health (ISSN 1660-4601). This special issue belongs to the section "Global Health".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 May 2019

Special Issue Editors

Guest Editor
Prof. Ko-Ling Chan

Department of Applied Social Sciences, The Hong Kong Polytechnic University, Hong Kong, China
Website | E-Mail
Guest Editor
Dr. Patrick Ip

Department of Paediatrics and Adolescent Medicine, LKS Faculty of Medicine, The University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong, China
Website | E-Mail

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Child victimization, the victimization experience by various forms of violence, including, but not limited to, child abuse and neglect by parents, violence, and bullying by peer and siblings, and exposure to neighborhood violence and crime, has been demonstrated to be a prevalent problem that leads to different negative impacts on victims. The negative consequences are often found to last until adolescence and even adulthood. Recent research efforts have been focused on combating child victimisation through early identification, cultural-specific prevention and intervention, as well as multidisciplinary collaboration among professionals from various fields.

This Special Issue on “Child Victimization” seeks articles on different kinds of child victimization, with a special focus on (i) child polyvictimization, which is the exposure to multiple types of victimization; (ii) associations between child victimization and other kinds of violence within the same family; (iii) cultural-specific issues on the problem, and (iv) prevention or intervention programs involving multidisciplinary collaboration. Empirical studies, systematic reviews, and meta-analytic studies will be considered. The keywords listed below provide an outline of some possible areas of interest.

Prof. Ko-Ling Chan
Dr. Patrick Ip
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1800 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Child victimization
  • Child abuse and neglect
  • Child maltreatment
  • Polyvictimization
  • Bullying
  • Witness of violence
  • Cultural
  • Prevention
  • Intervention
  • Multidisciplinary

Published Papers (6 papers)

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Research

Open AccessArticle Effect of Generational Status on Child Well-Being: Mediating Effects of Social Support and Residential Instability
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2019, 16(3), 435; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph16030435
Received: 4 December 2018 / Revised: 28 January 2019 / Accepted: 31 January 2019 / Published: 2 February 2019
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Abstract
Children in migrant families often encounter difficulties that have great impacts on their health. However, there is a lack of research to examine generational status and child health-related quality of life (HRQoL). This study compared the HRQoL of children, aged 3 to 19 [...] Read more.
Children in migrant families often encounter difficulties that have great impacts on their health. However, there is a lack of research to examine generational status and child health-related quality of life (HRQoL). This study compared the HRQoL of children, aged 3 to 19 years, born in Hong Kong to mainland parents with second- and third-or-higher-generation children; and explores the mediating effects of residential instability and of social support on the association between generational status and HRQoL. A sample comprised 4807 reports on children (mean age = 7.47 years) in Hong Kong was analyzed. Significantly lower HRQoL related to physical functioning was observed among children in migrant families. Association between generational status and child HRQoL was mediated by commute time between home and school, frequency of moving home, and social support. Findings lend utility to addressing similar issues amongst other developmental immigrant populations. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Child Victimisation)
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Open AccessArticle Doxing: What Adolescents Look for and Their Intentions
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2019, 16(2), 218; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph16020218
Received: 15 December 2018 / Revised: 6 January 2019 / Accepted: 10 January 2019 / Published: 14 January 2019
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Abstract
Doxing is a form of cyberbullying in which personal information on others is sought and released, thereby violating their privacy and facilitating further harassment. This study examined adolescents’ doxing participation using a representative sample of 2120 Hong Kong secondary school students. Just over [...] Read more.
Doxing is a form of cyberbullying in which personal information on others is sought and released, thereby violating their privacy and facilitating further harassment. This study examined adolescents’ doxing participation using a representative sample of 2120 Hong Kong secondary school students. Just over one in 10 had engaged in doxing, and doxing behavior significantly increased the probability of disclosing personal information on others (odds ratio ranged between 2.705 and 5.181). Social and hostile doxing were the two most common forms of doxing. Girls were significantly more likely to conduct social doxing (χ2 = 11.84, p < 0.001), where their target was to obtain social information (χ2 = 4.79, p = 0.029), whereas boys were more likely to engage in hostile doxing aimed at obtaining personally identifiable information (χ2 = 4.31, p = 0.038) and information on others’ current living situations (χ2 = 4.17, p = 0.041). Students who had perpetrated doxing acts were more likely to have experienced information disclosure as victims, perpetrators, or bystanders. Future studies should examine doxing’s impacts and its relationship with other forms of cyberbullying and traditional bullying. Because doxing may lead to on- and off-line harassment, family, adolescents, schools, and communities must work together to develop effective approaches for combating it. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Child Victimisation)
Open AccessArticle Traditional Bullying and Discriminatory Bullying Around Special Educational Needs: Psychometric Properties of Two Instruments to Measure It
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2019, 16(1), 142; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph16010142
Received: 26 November 2018 / Revised: 23 December 2018 / Accepted: 28 December 2018 / Published: 7 January 2019
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Abstract
Two important challenges in research on bullying are to have reliable tools to measure traditional bullying and discriminatory bullying related to special educational needs (SEN), and to learn more about their prevalence. We present the validations of two instruments to measure bullying (European [...] Read more.
Two important challenges in research on bullying are to have reliable tools to measure traditional bullying and discriminatory bullying related to special educational needs (SEN), and to learn more about their prevalence. We present the validations of two instruments to measure bullying (European Bullying Intervention Project Questionnaire, EBIPQ) and discriminatory bullying with respect to SEN (EBIPQ–Special Education Needs Discrimination version, henceforth EBIPQ-SEND). A total of 17,309 teenagers from Ecuador took part in the study (M = 14.76, SD = 1.65; 49.9% male). The item response theory analyses evidenced accuracy and quality of the measures. The confirmatory factor analyses of the EBIPQ and the EBIPQ-SEND revealed the same two-factor structure—aggression and victimization—regardless of gender, showing optimal fit indexes. We present the results of the prevalence according to the roles of participation in traditional bullying and discriminatory bullying around SEN. Significant gender and age differences were observed for involvement in both phenomena. We also discuss the advantages of applying the EBIPQ and the EBIPQ-SEND to evaluate and diagnose harassment and discriminatory harassment around SEN. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Child Victimisation)
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Open AccessArticle Doxing Victimization and Emotional Problems among Secondary School Students in Hong Kong
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2018, 15(12), 2665; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph15122665
Received: 26 October 2018 / Revised: 24 November 2018 / Accepted: 25 November 2018 / Published: 27 November 2018
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Abstract
Doxing is the searching for and intentional disclosure of private information about a particular individual on the Internet without his or her consent, and is often used to exact punishment. The aim of this study was to investigate the associations between doxing victimization [...] Read more.
Doxing is the searching for and intentional disclosure of private information about a particular individual on the Internet without his or her consent, and is often used to exact punishment. The aim of this study was to investigate the associations between doxing victimization and emotional problems in secondary school students, paying particular regard to the impacts of different types of doxed information, the relationship between the perpetrators and victims of doxing, and the nature of the online platforms where doxing occurs. A sample of 2120 Hong Kong secondary school students of differing socioeconomic backgrounds participated in the study. The results show that almost all types of disclosed personal information result in negative feelings in victims, including depression, anxiety, and stress. Girls were also found to be more likely than boys to be doxed. Significant associations were found between emotional problems and the disclosure of mobile phone numbers and personal photos and videos; doxing conducted by schoolmates and anxiety and depression, and doxing through Instant Messenger and anxiety. Further exploration of integrated cyber violence prevention programs and research on the details of doxing are recommended. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Child Victimisation)
Open AccessArticle Internet Risks: An Overview of Victimization in Cyberbullying, Cyber Dating Abuse, Sexting, Online Grooming and Problematic Internet Use
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2018, 15(11), 2471; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph15112471
Received: 11 October 2018 / Revised: 26 October 2018 / Accepted: 30 October 2018 / Published: 5 November 2018
Cited by 1 | PDF Full-text (714 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
The advance of digital media has created risks that affect the bio-psycho-social well-being of adolescents. Some of these risks are cyberbullying, cyber dating abuse, sexting, online grooming and problematic Internet use. These risks have been studied individually or through associations of some of [...] Read more.
The advance of digital media has created risks that affect the bio-psycho-social well-being of adolescents. Some of these risks are cyberbullying, cyber dating abuse, sexting, online grooming and problematic Internet use. These risks have been studied individually or through associations of some of them but they have not been explored conjointly. The main objective is to determine the comorbidity between the described Internet risks and to identify the profiles of victimized adolescents. An analytical and cross-sectional study with 3212 participants (46.3% males) from 22 Spanish schools was carried out. Mean age was 13.92 ± 1.44 years (range 11–21). Assessment tools with adequate standards of reliability and validity were used. The main results indicate that the most prevalent single risk is cyberbullying victimization (30.27%). The most prevalent two-risk associations are cyberbullying-online grooming (12.61%) and cyberbullying-sexting (5.79%). The three-risk combination of cyberbullying-sexting-grooming (7.12%) is highlighted, while 5.49% of the adolescents present all the risks. In addition, four profiles are distinguished, with the profile Sexualized risk behaviour standing out, with high scores in grooming and sexting and low scores in the rest of the risks. Determining the comorbidity of risks is useful for clinical and educational interventions, as it can provide information about additional risks. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Child Victimisation)
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Open AccessArticle Traditional Bullying, Cyberbullying and Mental Health in Early Adolescents: Forgiveness as a Protective Factor of Peer Victimisation
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2018, 15(11), 2389; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph15112389
Received: 3 September 2018 / Revised: 12 October 2018 / Accepted: 24 October 2018 / Published: 28 October 2018
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Abstract
Traditional and online bullying are prevalent throughout adolescence. Given their negative consequences, it is necessary to seek protective factors to reduce or even prevent their detrimental effects in the mental health of adolescents before they become chronic. Previous studies have demonstrated the protective [...] Read more.
Traditional and online bullying are prevalent throughout adolescence. Given their negative consequences, it is necessary to seek protective factors to reduce or even prevent their detrimental effects in the mental health of adolescents before they become chronic. Previous studies have demonstrated the protective role of forgiveness in mental health after several transgressions. This study assessed whether forgiveness moderated the effects of bullying victimisation and cybervictimisation on mental health in a sample of 1044 early adolescents (527 females; M = 13.09 years; SD = 0.77). Participants completed a questionnaire battery that measures both forms of bullying victimisation, suicidal thoughts and behaviours, satisfaction with life, and forgiveness. Consistent with a growing body of research, results reveal that forgiveness is a protective factor against the detrimental effects of both forms of bullying. Among more victimised and cybervictimised adolescents, those with high levels of forgiveness were found to report significantly higher levels of satisfaction compared to those with low levels of forgiveness. Likewise, those reporting traditional victimisation and higher levels of forgiveness levels showed lower levels of suicidal risk. Our findings contribute to an emerging relationship between forgiveness after bullying and indicators of mental health, providing new areas for research and intervention. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Child Victimisation)
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Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health EISSN 1660-4601 Published by MDPI AG, Basel, Switzerland RSS E-Mail Table of Contents Alert
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