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Analytical Methods for Volatile Organic Compounds (VOCs) Determination and Monitoring in Different Matrixes: Potentialities and Drawbacks of On-Line and Off-Line Methods

A special issue of International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health (ISSN 1660-4601). This special issue belongs to the section "Environmental Science and Engineering".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (31 December 2022) | Viewed by 6661

Special Issue Editors


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Guest Editor
Department of Biosciences, Biotechnologies and Environment, University “Aldo Moro”, Via Orabona 4, 70126 Bari, Italy
Interests: atmospheric chemistry and modeling; indoor air quality (IAQ); volatile organic compounds (VOCs); particulate matter (PM); breath analysis; monitoring strategies; odors monitoring; emissions from materials; sensors networks; PM chemical characterization
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

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Assistant Guest Editor
Department of Biosciences, Biotechnologies and Environment, University “Aldo Moro”, Via Orabona 4, 70126 Bari, Italy
Interests: atmospheric pollution; indoor air quality (IAQ); volatile organic compounds (VOCs); particulate matter (PM); breath analysis; monitoring strategies; odors monitoring; emissions from materials and consumer products; primary and secondary pollutants; test emission chambers; sensors networks; PM chemical characterization
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

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Assistant Guest Editor
Department of Biology, University of Bari Aldo Moro, 70126 Bari, Italy
Interests: atmospheric chemistry and modeling; aerosol science; Indoor Air Quality (IAQ); Volatile Organic Compounds (VOCs), Particulate Matter (PM); breath analysis; monitoring strategies; odors monitoring; emissions from materials; sensors network; PM chemical characterization; sustainability; environmental health
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Volatile organic compounds (VOCs) represent a wide range of volatile chemicals detectable in several environmental matrices (air, water, and soil) as well as in human biological fluids (exhaled breath, urine, feces, and sweat). VOCs are worthy of an in-depth analysis as they are ubiquitous and selected ones are of high concern from a toxicological point of view. For instance, atmospheric VOCs, emitted to a lesser to a greater extent by both biogenic and anthropogenic sources (i.e., traffic, industrial activities, gas service stations), may play a critical role in the chemistry of the lower atmosphere leading to the formation of high concern secondary pollutants with potentially harmful effects on the human health, ecosystems, and the environment. VOCs are also detectable inside enclosed environments (offices, private dwellings, public places) at concentrations up to ten times higher than outdoors because VOCs are emitted by a wide selection of building materials and finishing products (paints, sealants, etc.) as well as consumer products (cleaning and disinfection products among others) and as a result of human activities (smoking, cooking, candle and incense burning, etc.). Furthermore, increasing interest has been recently paid to VOCs analysis in human biological fluids. Recent research outcomes recognize VOC detection in human breath and other body fluids as a new frontier in non-invasive, fast, and inexpensive monitoring of human metabolism and health status. VOCs are indeed the result of metabolic pathways and their presence or increased concentration may be related to the alteration of specific biochemical pathways, symptomatic of a pathological condition.

The last decade has witnessed a progressive evolution of the methodological approaches for the detection of VOCs and monitoring through the exploration of the potentialities of upgraded analytical techniques and innovative high temporal resolution devices. This Special Issue will provide a state of the art of the potentialities and drawbacks of existing methodological approaches as a function of the typology of the matrix, VOCs concentration, and objectives of the investigation.

Dr. Alessia Di Gilio
Dr. Jolanda Palmisani
Prof. Dr. Gianluigi de Gennaro
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

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Keywords

  • VOCs
  • VOCs determination
  • VOCs monitoring
  • High-resolution monitoring
  • Analytical techniques
  • Air quality
  • Odors
  • Indoor air quality
  • Breath analysis
  • Food

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

19 pages, 4597 KiB  
Article
Integrated Sustainable Management of Petrochemical Industrial Air Pollution
by Jutarat Keawboonchu, Sarawut Thepanondh, Vanitchaya Kultan, Nattaporn Pinthong, Wissawa Malakan and Mark Gregory Robson
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2023, 20(3), 2280; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph20032280 - 27 Jan 2023
Cited by 7 | Viewed by 2582
Abstract
The emission inventory, emission factor, and spatial concentration distribution of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) from a petrochemical industry (aromatics plant) were intensively evaluated in this study to elucidate the potential sources of BTX emission and their contribution to ambient concentrations. Five emission groups [...] Read more.
The emission inventory, emission factor, and spatial concentration distribution of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) from a petrochemical industry (aromatics plant) were intensively evaluated in this study to elucidate the potential sources of BTX emission and their contribution to ambient concentrations. Five emission groups were quantified through direct measurement and emission models. These data were then used as input for the AERMOD dispersion model for the source apportionment analysis. The source to ambient contribution analysis revealed that a wastewater treatment facility and organic liquid storage tank were major contributors accounting for about 20.6–88.4% and 10.3–75.4% to BTX environmental concentrations, respectively. The highest annual ambient concentrations of benzene (B), toluene (T), and xylenes (X) were predicted as 9.0, 2.8, and 57.9 µg/m3 at the fence line of the plant boundary, respectively. These findings assist policymakers in prioritizing the appropriate control measures to the right source by considering not just the amount released but also their contribution to ambient concentrations. This study suggested that the wastewater treatment unit should be changed to the closed system which will benefit reduction in its emission (45.05%) as well as effectively minimizing ambient VOC concentration by 49.96% compared to its normal operation. Full article
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12 pages, 2218 KiB  
Article
Occurrence, Potential Sources, and Risk Assessment of Volatile Organic Compounds in the Han River Basin, South Korea
by Jong Kwon Im, Soon Ju Yu, Sujin Kim, Sang Hun Kim, Hye Ran Noh and Moon Kyung Kim
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2021, 18(7), 3727; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph18073727 - 2 Apr 2021
Cited by 11 | Viewed by 3014
Abstract
Increasing public awareness about the aesthetics and safety of water sources has shifted researchers’ attention to the adverse effects of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) on humans and aquatic organisms. A total of 17 VOCs, including 10 volatile halogenated hydrocarbons and seven volatile non-halogenated [...] Read more.
Increasing public awareness about the aesthetics and safety of water sources has shifted researchers’ attention to the adverse effects of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) on humans and aquatic organisms. A total of 17 VOCs, including 10 volatile halogenated hydrocarbons and seven volatile non-halogenated hydrocarbons, were investigated at 36 sites of the Han River Basin, which is the largest and most important drinking water source for residents of the Seoul metropolitan area and Gyeonggi province in South Korea. The VOC concentrations ranged from below detection limits to 1.813 µg L−1. The most frequently detected VOC was 1,2-dichloropropane, with a detection frequency of 80.56%, as it is used as a soil fumigant, chemical intermediate, and industrial solvent. In terms of geographical trends, the sampling sites that were under the influence of sewage and industrial wastewater treatment plants were more polluted with VOCs than other areas. This observation was also supported by the results of the principal component analysis. In the present study, the detected concentrations of VOCs were much lower than that of the predicted no-effect concentrations, suggesting low ecological risk in the Han River. However, a lack of available ecotoxicity data and limited comparable studies warrants further studies on these compounds. Full article
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