Special Issue "Space, Place and Health Outcomes"

A special issue of International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health (ISSN 1660-4601). This special issue belongs to the section "Environmental Health".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 October 2020.

Special Issue Editors

Dr. Ofer Amram
Website
Guest Editor
Elson S. Floyd College of Medicine, Washington State University, 412 E. Spokane Falls Blvd. Spokane, WA 99202-2131, USA
Interests: spatial epidemiology; geographic information systems; exposure assessment; public health
Prof. Dr. Blake Walker
Website
Guest Editor
Institut für Geographie, Friedrich-Alexander-Universität Erlangen-Nürnberg, Wetterkreuz 15, D-91058 Erlangen, Raum 3.045, Germany
Interests: digital health geography; spatial epidemiology; quantitative analysis; geoinformatics and critical geoinformation processing

Special Issue Information

Dear colleagues,

The environment in which we live, work, and spend our time can have a direct impact on our health. Contextual factors, like social and economic features of neighborhoods, have been shown to have a significant impact on an array of health outcomes, including mortality, chronic conditions, mental health, injuries, violence, and other important health indicators. The physical and social environments of neighborhoods can shape our behavior, thus having a direct impact on our health. For example, unsafe neighborhoods can affect our overall wellbeing by denying us the opportunity to have physical activity and spend time outdoors. On the other hand, walkable neighborhoods, access to playgrounds, and affordable, nutritious food can encourage healthy behaviors and lifestyles. Moreover, individuals are more likely to have convenient access to health facilities when they are located within close proximity to their residence or if appropriate forms of transportation are available within their neighborhood.

This Special Issue of IJERPH focuses on the links between space, place, and health outcomes. We are happy to accept manuscripts from different disciplines. We are particularly interested in studies that advance the understanding of the causal mechanisms linking environments and health outcomes or associated behavioral risk factors. We encourage studies utilizing novel methodologies to assess and derive exposure and neighborhood characteristics.

Dr. Ofer Amram
Prof. Dr. Blake Walker
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2300 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Exposure assessment
  • Healthy environments
  • Neighbourhoods
  • Socioeconomic status
  • Epidemiology

Published Papers (5 papers)

Order results
Result details
Select all
Export citation of selected articles as:

Research

Jump to: Review

Open AccessArticle
Effect of Viewing Video Representation of the Urban Environment and Forest Environment on Mood and Level of Procrastination
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2020, 17(14), 5109; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph17145109 - 15 Jul 2020
Abstract
A common problem among students is the problem of delaying important work activities, which is conceptualized as procrastination. Since procrastination can cause considerable costs for society, we would like to find a method to effectively alleviate the symptoms of this conditioning. It has [...] Read more.
A common problem among students is the problem of delaying important work activities, which is conceptualized as procrastination. Since procrastination can cause considerable costs for society, we would like to find a method to effectively alleviate the symptoms of this conditioning. It has been proven in an earlier study that staying in the forest environment increases vitality and reduces anxiety, and the negative state of these features can be associated with the intensification of procrastination symptoms. Therefore, it is likely that watching a forest video may decrease the probability or intensity of procrastination. To measure the impact of the forest environment on the level of procrastination of the subjects, a randomized experiment was carried out, in which the subjects watched in random order (on different days) one of two 15-min videos: one showing a walk in the forest area and one showing a walk in an urban environment (control). We measured the level of so-called ‘fluid procrastination’ including three aspects: ‘lack of energy to do the work’, ‘inability to get to work’ and ’pessimistic attitude to do the work’ with a set of questions the respondents completed before and after the experiment. The results showed that one aspect of fluid procrastination (‘pessimistic attitude to do the work’) can be effectively lowered by watching a video showing the forest environment. In contrast, watching a video of an urban environment increased the procrastination levels for two other aspects of procrastination (‘lack of energy to do the work’, ‘inability to get to work’). We also measured three other parameters before and after the experiment: mood state, restoration and vitality. Watching the video from forest area raised mood and restoration and watching the video from urban area, decreased mood, vitality and restoration. The study suggests that watching a video showing forest landscapes could be used as an effective remedy for problems related to procrastination among students. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Space, Place and Health Outcomes)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Open AccessArticle
Environmental Correlates of Reaching a Centenarian Age: Analysis of 144,665 Deaths in Washington State for 2011−2015
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2020, 17(8), 2828; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph17082828 - 20 Apr 2020
Abstract
Objective: This study examined the association of several social and environmental factors on the likelihood of reaching centenarian age for older adults in Washington State. Methods: A survival analysis of reaching centenarian age for older adults aged 75 years and above was performed [...] Read more.
Objective: This study examined the association of several social and environmental factors on the likelihood of reaching centenarian age for older adults in Washington State. Methods: A survival analysis of reaching centenarian age for older adults aged 75 years and above was performed using Washington State mortality data from 2011−2015. Models were adjusted for sex, race, education, marital status, and neighborhood level social and environmental variables at the block group level. Geographic clusters of increased chance of becoming a centenarian were also mapped. Results: In the adjusted model, increased neighborhood walkability, lower education level, higher socioeconomic status, and a higher percent of working age population were positively associated with reaching centenarian age. Being widowed, divorced/separated, or never married were also positively correlated compared to being married. Additionally, being white or female were positively correlated with reaching centenarian status. Discussion: Several social and environmental factors are correlated with becoming a centenarian in Washington State. In this study, we explore findings that are consistent with previous research, as well as some that have not been previously explained. More research is needed to expand upon these findings in this rapidly growing field. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Space, Place and Health Outcomes)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Open AccessArticle
Proximity to Screening Site, Rurality, and Neighborhood Disadvantage: Treatment Status among Individuals with Sexually Transmitted Infections in Yakima County, Washington
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2020, 17(8), 2679; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph17082679 - 14 Apr 2020
Abstract
Background: Early sexually transmitted infections (STIs) diagnosis facilitates prompt treatment initiation and contributes to reduced transmission. This study examined the extent to which contextual characteristics such as proximity to screening site, rurality, and neighborhood disadvantage along with demographic variables, may influence treatment [...] Read more.
Background: Early sexually transmitted infections (STIs) diagnosis facilitates prompt treatment initiation and contributes to reduced transmission. This study examined the extent to which contextual characteristics such as proximity to screening site, rurality, and neighborhood disadvantage along with demographic variables, may influence treatment seeking behavior among individuals with STIs (i.e., chlamydia, gonorrhea, and syphilis). Methods: Data on 16,075 diagnosed cases of STIs between 2007 and 2018 in Yakima County were obtained from the Washington State Department of Health Database Surveillance System. Multilevel models were applied to explore the associations between contextual and demographic characteristics and two outcomes: (a) not receiving treatment and (b) the number of days to receiving treatment. Results: Contextual risk factors for not receiving treatment or having increased number of days to treatment were living ≥10 miles from the screening site and living in micropolitan, small towns, or rural areas. Older age was a protective factor and being female was a risk for both outcomes. Conclusions: Healthcare providers and facilities should be made aware of demographic and contextual characteristics that can impact treatment seeking behavior among individuals with STIs, especially among youth, females, and rural residents. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Space, Place and Health Outcomes)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Open AccessArticle
Qualitative Field Observation of Pedestrian Injury Hotspots: A Mixed-Methods Approach for Developing Built- and Socioeconomic-Environmental Risk Signatures
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2020, 17(6), 2066; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph17062066 - 20 Mar 2020
Abstract
Road traffic injuries constitute a significant global health burden; the World Health Organization estimates that they result in 1.35 million deaths annually. While most pedestrian injury studies rely predominantly on statistical modelling, this paper argues for a mixed-methods approach combining spatial analysis, environmental [...] Read more.
Road traffic injuries constitute a significant global health burden; the World Health Organization estimates that they result in 1.35 million deaths annually. While most pedestrian injury studies rely predominantly on statistical modelling, this paper argues for a mixed-methods approach combining spatial analysis, environmental scans, and local knowledge for assessing environmental risk factors. Using data from the Nova Scotia Trauma Registry, severe pedestrian injury cases and ten corresponding hotspots were mapped across the Halifax Regional Municipality. Using qualitative observation, quantitative environmental scans, and a socioeconomic deprivation index, we assessed hotspots over three years to identify key social- and built-environmental correlates. Injuries occurred in a range of settings; however, clear patterns were not observed based on land use, age, or socio-economic status (SES) alone. Three hotspots revealed an association between elevated pedestrian injury and a pattern of geographic, environmental, and socio-economic factors: low- to middle-SES housing separated from a roadside attraction by several lanes of traffic, and blind hills/bends. An additional generalized scenario was constructed representing common risk factors across all hotspots. This study is unique in that it moves beyond individual measures (e.g., statistical, environmental scans, or geographic information systems (GIS) mapping) to combine all three methods toward identifying environmental features associated with pedestrian motor vehicle crashes (PMVC). Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Space, Place and Health Outcomes)
Show Figures

Graphical abstract

Review

Jump to: Research

Open AccessReview
Interactions between the Physical and Social Environments with Adverse Pregnancy Events Related to Placental Disorders—A Scoping Review
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2020, 17(15), 5421; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph17155421 - 28 Jul 2020
Abstract
Background: Due to different social and physical environments across Africa, understanding how these environments differ in interacting with placental disorders will play an important role in developing effective interventions. Methods: A scoping review was conducted, to identify current knowledge on interactions between the [...] Read more.
Background: Due to different social and physical environments across Africa, understanding how these environments differ in interacting with placental disorders will play an important role in developing effective interventions. Methods: A scoping review was conducted, to identify current knowledge on interactions between the physical and social environment and the incidence of placental disease in Africa. Results: Heavy metals were said to be harmful when environmental concentrations are beyond critical limits. Education level, maternal age, attendance of antenatal care and parity were the most investigated social determinants. Conclusions: More evidence is needed to determine the relationships between the environment and placental function in Africa. The results show that understanding the nature of the relationship between social determinants of health (SDH) and placental health outcomes plays a pivotal role in understanding the risk in the heterogenous communities in Africa. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Space, Place and Health Outcomes)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Back to TopTop