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Special Issue "Light Pollution"

A special issue of International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health (ISSN 1660-4601). This special issue belongs to the section "Environmental Health".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 15 October 2022 | Viewed by 7998

Special Issue Editors

Dr. Irena Fryc
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Electrical Engineering Faculty, Białystok University of Technology, 15-351 Białystok, Poland
Interests: light; lighting; light pollutions; energy efficiency; light and color; colorimetry; photometry; measurement of optical radiation; circadian radiation; light color quality; light sources; LEDs; SSL - solid state lighting; luminaires; lighting design
Dr. Tomasz Ściężor
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Faculty of Environmental and Power Engineering, Cracow University of Technology, Warszawska 24, 31-155 Krakow, Poland
Interests: light pollution; astronomy; physics; ecology

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

This Special Issue of the International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health (IJERPH) focuses on Light Pollution. Artificial outdoor lighting at night (ALAN) can be a source of unwanted light pollution, which is visually perceived as a brilliant hemisphere surrounding the city sky. The sky glow is perceptible even from space. It should be noted that this unnecessary brightening of the sky is not just a “sky glow” effect, but also causes other unwanted effects such as biological light pollution and negative impacts on human health. ALAN is increasing rapidly and can disturb nightscapes, ecosystems, and consequently biodiversity—including protected areas. It is also wasted electricity, which negatively affects the environment in the form of air dust, greenhouse gases, and the production of ash and slag emissions by power plants. Papers addressing these topics are invited for this Special Issue.

Topics of interest include, but are not limited to:

  1. Artificial radiance monitoring from airborne and Earth-orbiting platforms;
  2. Long-term assessment of the evolution of the artificial night sky brightness;
  3. Modeling and measurement of artificial light propagation in the atmosphere;
  4. Modeling of obstructive outdoor lights;
  5. Multi- and hyperspectral techniques for light pollution research;
  6. Optics and photonics components and devices for light pollution research;
  7. Photonic technologies for healthy and environmentally sustainable lighting;
  8. Quantitative methods for assessing human exposure to artificial light at night.

Dr. Irena Fryc
Dr. Tomasz Ściężor
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2500 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • unwanted artificial light
  • light pollution
  • obstructive lighting
  • botanical light pollution
  • sky glow
  • sustainable lighting
  • light pollution measurement devices

Published Papers (4 papers)

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Article
Light Pollution and Circadian Misalignment: A Healthy, Blue-Free, White Light-Emitting Diode to Avoid Chronodisruption
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2022, 19(3), 1849; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph19031849 - 07 Feb 2022
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 1232
Abstract
Sunlight has participated in the development of all life forms on Earth. The micro-world and the daily rhythms of plants and animals are strongly regulated by the light–dark rhythm. Human beings have followed this pattern for thousands of years. The discovery and development [...] Read more.
Sunlight has participated in the development of all life forms on Earth. The micro-world and the daily rhythms of plants and animals are strongly regulated by the light–dark rhythm. Human beings have followed this pattern for thousands of years. The discovery and development of artificial light sources eliminated the workings of this physiological clock. The world’s current external environment is full of light pollution. In many electrical light bulbs used today and considered “environmentally friendly,” such as LED devices, electrical energy is converted into short-wavelength illumination that we have not experienced in the past. Such illumination effectively becomes “biological light pollution” and disrupts our pineal melatonin production. The suppression of melatonin at night alters our circadian rhythms (biological rhythms with a periodicity of 24 h). This alteration is known as chronodisruption and is associated with numerous diseases. In this article, we present a blue-free WLED (white light-emitting diode) that can avoid chronodisruption and preserve circadian rhythms. This WLED also maintains the spectral quality of light measured through parameters such as CRI (color reproduction index). Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Light Pollution)
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Article
Impact of Thermal Dissipation on the Lighting Performance and Useful Life of LED Luminaires Applied to Urban Lighting: A Case Study
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2022, 19(2), 752; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph19020752 - 10 Jan 2022
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 672
Abstract
Currently, LED technology is an established form of lighting in our cities and homes. Its lighting performance, durability, energy efficiency and light, together with the economic savings that its use implies, are displacing other classic forms of lighting. However, some problems associated with [...] Read more.
Currently, LED technology is an established form of lighting in our cities and homes. Its lighting performance, durability, energy efficiency and light, together with the economic savings that its use implies, are displacing other classic forms of lighting. However, some problems associated with the durability of the equipment related to the problems of thermal dissipation and high temperature have begun to be detected, which end up affecting their luminous intensity and the useful life. There are many studies that show a direct relationship between the low quality of LED lighting and the aging of the equipment or its overheating, observing the depreciation of the intensity of the light and the visual chromaticity performance that can affect the health of users by altering circadian rhythms. On the other hand, the shortened useful life of the luminaires due to thermal stress has a direct impact on the LCA (Life Cycle Analysis) and its environmental impact, which indirectly affects human health. The purpose of this article is to compare the results previously obtained, at different contour temperatures, by theoretical thermal simulation of the 3D model of LED street lighting luminaires through the ANSYS Fluent simulation software. Contrasting these results with the practical results obtained with a thermal imaging camera, the study shows how the phenomenon of thermal dissipation plays a fundamental role in the lighting performance of LED technology. The parameter studied in this work is junction temperature (Tj), and how it can be used to predict the luminous properties in the design phase of luminaires in order to increase their useful life. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Light Pollution)
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Article
An Impact Analysis of Artificial Light at Night (ALAN) on Bats. A Case Study of the Historic Monument and Natura 2000 Wisłoujście Fortress in Gdansk, Poland
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2021, 18(21), 11327; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph182111327 - 28 Oct 2021
Cited by 3 | Viewed by 1529
Abstract
The artificial light at night (ALAN) present in many cities and towns has a negative impact on numerous organisms that live alongside humans, including bats. Therefore, we investigated if the artificial illumination of the historic Wisłoujście Fortress in Gdańsk, Poland (part of the [...] Read more.
The artificial light at night (ALAN) present in many cities and towns has a negative impact on numerous organisms that live alongside humans, including bats. Therefore, we investigated if the artificial illumination of the historic Wisłoujście Fortress in Gdańsk, Poland (part of the Natura 2000 network), during nighttime events, which included an outdoor electronic dance music (EDM) festival, might be responsible for increased light pollution and the decline in recent years of the pond bat (Myotis dasycneme). An assessment of light pollution levels was made using the methods of geographical information system (GIS) and free-of-charge satellite remote sensing (SRS) technology. Moreover, this paper reviewed the most important approaches for environmental protection of bats in the context of ecological light pollution, including International, European, and Polish regulatory frameworks. The analysis of this interdisciplinary study confirmed the complexity of the problem and highlighted, too, the need for better control of artificial illumination in such sensitive areas. It also revealed that SRS was not the best light pollution assessment method for this particular case study due to several reasons listed in this paper. As a result, the authors’ proposal for improvements also involved practical recommendations for devising suitable strategies for lighting research and practice in the Natura 2000 Wisłoujście Fortress site located adjacent to urban areas to reduce the potential negative impact of ALAN on bats and their natural habitats. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Light Pollution)
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Hypothesis
Urban Lighting Research Transdisciplinary Framework—A Collaborative Process with Lighting Professionals
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2021, 18(2), 624; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph18020624 - 13 Jan 2021
Cited by 12 | Viewed by 3415
Abstract
Over the past decades, lighting professionals have influenced the experience of the night by brightly illuminating streets, buildings, skylines, and landscapes 24/7. When this became the accepted norm, a dual perspective on night-time was shaped and the visual enjoyment of visitors after dusk [...] Read more.
Over the past decades, lighting professionals have influenced the experience of the night by brightly illuminating streets, buildings, skylines, and landscapes 24/7. When this became the accepted norm, a dual perspective on night-time was shaped and the visual enjoyment of visitors after dusk was prioritized over natural nightscapes (nocturnal landscapes). During this time, researchers of artificial light at night (ALAN) observed and reported a gradual increase in unnatural brightness and a shift in color of the night-time environment. As a consequence, ALAN has been identified as a relevant pollutant of aquatic and terrestrial habitats, and an environmental stressor, which may adversely affect a wide range of organisms, from micro-organisms to humans. Unfortunately, lighting professionals and ALAN researchers usually attempt to solve today’s sustainable urban lighting problems distinctive to their fields of study, without a dialogue between research and practice. Therefore, in order to translate research knowledge as an applicable solution for the lighting practice and to minimize the impact on the environment, a collaborative framework involving a transdisciplinary process with lighting professionals is crucial to potentially bring the practice, research, production, decision-making, and planning closer to each other. This paper presents a framework to help reduce the existing gap of knowledge, because appropriate lighting applications depend upon it. Access to less light polluted nightscapes in urban environments is just as important as access to unpolluted water, food, and air. This call for action towards sustainable urban lighting should be included in future lighting policies to solve the urgent environmental and health challenges facing our world. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Light Pollution)
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