ijerph-logo

Journal Browser

Journal Browser

Current Insights in Promoting Well-Being at Work

A special issue of International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health (ISSN 1660-4601). This special issue belongs to the section "Occupational Safety and Health".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (30 April 2023) | Viewed by 27730

Special Issue Editors


E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
School of Health Sciences, Faculty of Medicine and Health, University of Sydney, Sydney, NSW 2006, Australia
Interests: return to work for people with disabilities; attitudes of employers and co-workers for people returning to work

E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
School of Health Sciences, The University of Newcastle, Newcastle, NSW 2308, Australia
Interests: occupational health and safety in industry

E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
School of Health Sciences, Faculty of Medicine and Health, University of Sydney, Sydney, NSW 2006, Australia
Interests: occupational health and safety; work and cancer; cognitive issues and cancer

E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
School of Health Sciences, Faculty of Medicine and Health, University of Sydney, Sydney, NSW 2006, Australia
Interests: work and neurological conditions and return to driving

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Paid work is a fundamental component of life for working aged adults and is an important source of self-identity, financial security, social interaction, meaning, and purpose. Work also provides benefits for physical and mental health and well-being. People with disabilities or chronic conditions and illnesses may find that work becomes a challenge to maintain. For some, injuries occurring in the workplace require a rehabilitation program provided by the employer, and, for others, a return to work after an acquired disability that is not related to the workplace may be difficult to achieve. According to the International Classification of Functioning from the World Health Organization, work is classified in the activity and participation elements of the classification, and would be affected by body system and structures, the environment, and personal factors. All of these issues are relevant to promoting well-being at work, especially in the context of disabilities, illness and injury, and an ageing population. Even for the working population in general (without disability, illness, or injury), well-being at work is essential to improve morale, productivity, and personal meaning in work roles. This has been clearly illustrated in the recent or current disruption in work status and environments caused by the COVID-19 pandemic. Papers addressing these topics are invited for this Special Issue, especially those combining a high academic standard coupled with a practical focus on functioning in the workplace in the context of a disability, injury, illness, and ageing, or in providing solutions for the well-being for the general working population.

Prof. Dr. Lynette Mackenzie
Prof. Dr. Carole James
Dr. Joanne Lewis
Dr. Joan O'Donnell
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2500 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • return to work
  • employment
  • rehabilitation
  • work capacity evaluation
  • disability
  • chronic conditions
  • cognition
  • physical activity

Published Papers (9 papers)

Order results
Result details
Select all
Export citation of selected articles as:

Research

Jump to: Review

24 pages, 1254 KiB  
Article
Remote, Disconnected, or Detached? Examining the Effects of Psychological Disconnectedness and Cynicism on Employee Performance, Wellbeing, and Work–Family Interface
by Laura Petitta and Valerio Ghezzi
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2023, 20(13), 6318; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph20136318 - 7 Jul 2023
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 3701
Abstract
Owing to the COVID-19 pandemic, organizations worldwide have implemented remote working arrangements that have blurred the work–family boundaries and brought to the forefront employees’ sense of disconnectedness from their workplace (i.e., organizational disconnectedness) as a concern for multiple organizational outcomes. Cynicism, a job [...] Read more.
Owing to the COVID-19 pandemic, organizations worldwide have implemented remote working arrangements that have blurred the work–family boundaries and brought to the forefront employees’ sense of disconnectedness from their workplace (i.e., organizational disconnectedness) as a concern for multiple organizational outcomes. Cynicism, a job burnout subdimension, refers to a negative and excessively detached response to relational overload at work. While both workplace disconnectedness and cynicism involve a toxic sense of detachment, they refer to different psychological mechanisms. The present study aims to examine how employee workplace disconnectedness differs from their cynicism, and how both constructs differentially exert their detrimental effects on employee performance, work–family interface, and wellbeing. Using anonymous survey data collected online in 2021 and 2022 from a sample of in-person and flexible workers nested within organizations, conceptual distinctiveness between workplace disconnectedness and cynicism was supported. Measurement invariance across the two groups was supported, and subsequent structural invariance analyses suggested a similar pattern of results for flexible and in-person workers. Specifically, compared to disconnectedness, cynicism exerted higher negative effects on mental health and higher positive effects on cognitive failures and family-to-work conflict. Conversely, compared to cynicism, disconnectedness exerted higher negative effects on performance and work-to-family conflict. That is, feeling indifferent toward others particularly affects mental health and errors, while feeling excluded especially hampers productivity and family life. Theoretical and practical (e.g., inclusive leadership, support groups) implications of these results are discussed in light of the globally rising rates of hybrid work arrangements and related costs for employee wellbeing and productivity. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Current Insights in Promoting Well-Being at Work)
Show Figures

Figure 1

16 pages, 750 KiB  
Article
Work-Related, Non-Specific Low Back Pain among Physiotherapists in France: Prevalence and Biomechanical and Psychosocial Risk Factors, as a Function of Practice Pattern
by Baptiste Pellissier, François-Régis Sarhan and Frédéric Telliez
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2023, 20(5), 4343; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph20054343 - 28 Feb 2023
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 1637
Abstract
Background. Physiotherapists worldwide experience lower back pain (LBP). Up to 80% of physiotherapists report having experienced an episode of LBP at some point in their career, and LBP is the most common musculoskeletal disorder in this profession. In France, the prevalence of LBP [...] Read more.
Background. Physiotherapists worldwide experience lower back pain (LBP). Up to 80% of physiotherapists report having experienced an episode of LBP at some point in their career, and LBP is the most common musculoskeletal disorder in this profession. In France, the prevalence of LBP among physiotherapists and associated work-related risk factors have not previously been studied. Objective. To determine whether the risk of work-related non-specific LBP among French physiotherapists depends on practice pattern. Method. A link to an online self-questionnaire was sent to French physiotherapists. The various practice patterns were compared with regard to the prevalence of LBP, the total number of days with LBP during the previous 12 months, and the degree of exposure to biomechanical, psychosocial and organisational risk factors. Results. Among the 604 physiotherapists included in the study, the prevalence of work-related, non-specific LBP in the previous 12 months was 40.4%. The prevalence was significantly greater among physiotherapists working in geriatrics (p = 0.033) and significantly lower in sports medicine (p = 0.010). Differences in exposure to risk factors were also found. Conclusions. The risk of non-specific LBP among French physiotherapists appears to depend on the mode of practice. All the various dimensions of risk must be taken into account. The present study could serve as a basis for more targeted research on the most exposed practices. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Current Insights in Promoting Well-Being at Work)
Show Figures

Figure 1

18 pages, 340 KiB  
Article
Occupational Violence Experienced by Care Workers in the Australian Home Care Sector When Assisting People with Dementia
by Atticus Maddox and Lynette Mackenzie
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2023, 20(1), 438; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph20010438 - 27 Dec 2022
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 1667
Abstract
Background: People with advancing dementia may be dependent on community services from home care workers and nurses to be supported at home. However, these care workers face difficulty undertaking their roles due to challenging behaviours or occupational violence. This study aimed to explore [...] Read more.
Background: People with advancing dementia may be dependent on community services from home care workers and nurses to be supported at home. However, these care workers face difficulty undertaking their roles due to challenging behaviours or occupational violence. This study aimed to explore the challenges faced by home care workers and nurses working with people diagnosed with dementia in the community, to identify job demands contributing to their vulnerability to occupational violence, and to determine ways to help manage occupational violence. Methods: A qualitative descriptive study was conducted by interviewing 10 homecare workers and six registered nurses from agencies in South Australia and New South Wales, Australia. Interviews were audiotaped, transcribed and inductive thematic data analysis was conducted. Results: The following themes were identified: (i) sources of threats; (ii) categories of violent, threatening or challenging behaviour; (iii) aggravating factors; (iv) early warning signs; (v) education and training; (vi) managing occupational violence, (vii) resources, (viii) outcomes associated with exposure to occupational violence. Conclusion: Serious issues were identified by participants, yet very little is known about occupational violence for these community care workers. Findings can inform what aspects of work design can be improved to moderate the effects of occupational violence exposure or mitigate rates of exposure, to enable long-term services for people with dementia. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Current Insights in Promoting Well-Being at Work)
9 pages, 628 KiB  
Article
Work-Related Self-Efficacy and Illness Identity in Adults with Autism
by Liron Lamash and Sonya Meyer
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2023, 20(1), 122; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph20010122 - 22 Dec 2022
Cited by 4 | Viewed by 2348
Abstract
Finding and retaining employment significantly challenges individuals with autism spectrum disorder (ASD). The employment rates of individuals with ASD are described as extremely low, barred by various environmental, occupational, and personal factors. Illness identity is how a person’s health condition integrates with their [...] Read more.
Finding and retaining employment significantly challenges individuals with autism spectrum disorder (ASD). The employment rates of individuals with ASD are described as extremely low, barred by various environmental, occupational, and personal factors. Illness identity is how a person’s health condition integrates with their identity and daily life and relates to self-esteem, employment, and quality of life. Adults with ASD may experience challenges developing positive identities within social and work environments, but illness identity has not been studied among this population. This study examines the autism identity of adults with ASD and the relationships to their self-reported work-related self-efficacy and quality of life. Seventeen participants aged 19–47 years diagnosed with ASD completed the Illness Identity Questionnaire, Work-Related Self-Efficacy Scale and World Health Organization Quality of Life Assessment. Participants reported significantly higher autism acceptance feelings. Negative feelings about living with autism were significantly correlated to lower work-related self-efficacy. Higher levels of enrichment feelings were significantly associated with a higher quality of life. These findings highlight the effect of illness identity on the work-related self-efficacy and quality of life among individuals with ASD. Allied health professionals and educators can assist these individuals in raising their awareness of how they perceive their autism, and in promoting its positive perception. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Current Insights in Promoting Well-Being at Work)
Show Figures

Figure 1

14 pages, 618 KiB  
Article
Correlation between Employee Performance, Well-Being, Job Satisfaction, and Life Satisfaction in Sedentary Jobs in Slovenian Enterprises
by Zinka Kosec, Stella Sekulic, Susan Wilson-Gahan, Katja Rostohar, Matej Tusak and Marta Bon
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2022, 19(16), 10427; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph191610427 - 21 Aug 2022
Cited by 9 | Viewed by 5685
Abstract
The purpose of this study was to explore the relationship between employees’ work performance and their well-being, job satisfaction, and life satisfaction in sedentary jobs in Slovenian enterprises using a mixed-methods research design. The quantitative component of the research included the responses to [...] Read more.
The purpose of this study was to explore the relationship between employees’ work performance and their well-being, job satisfaction, and life satisfaction in sedentary jobs in Slovenian enterprises using a mixed-methods research design. The quantitative component of the research included the responses to four selected questionnaires of 120 employees in 22 identified enterprises (out of 81), with more than 20 employees, having more than 85 percent sedentary jobs. Each of four questionnaires was chosen to cover one area of enquiry under the research foci of work performance, job satisfaction, life satisfaction and well-being. The statistical program STATA was used for data analyses. The analysis shows statistically significant positive correlations between employee performance and job satisfaction (r = 0.35), employee performance and life satisfaction (r = 0.28), life satisfaction and well-being (r = 0.33), and job satisfaction and well-being, whereas the correlation between well-being and work performance did not prove to be statistically significant. The qualitative component of the mixed-methods research design included systematic observation combined with one-to-one discussions. The results indicated that job satisfaction and life satisfaction are more significant in determining work performance in sedentary jobs than employee well-being and that being unwell is still considered a sign of weakness; therefore, employees who are unwell do not want to expose themselves and refuse to cooperate in activities and studies about well-being. Further research examining the impact on work performance of organizational climate measurements in sedentary jobs is recommended. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Current Insights in Promoting Well-Being at Work)
Show Figures

Figure 1

14 pages, 711 KiB  
Article
The Effects of COVID-19 Lockdown on the Perception of Physical Activity and on the Perception of Musculoskeletal Symptoms in Computer Workers: Comparative Longitudinal Study Design
by Sara Moreira, Maria Begoña Criado, Maria Salomé Ferreira, Jorge Machado, Carla Gonçalves, Cristina Mesquita, Sofia Lopes and Paula Clara Santos
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2022, 19(12), 7311; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph19127311 - 14 Jun 2022
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 2300
Abstract
Lockdown resulting from the pandemic led to a change in the health habits of the computer workers community. Sedentary work, together with less active lifestyles, aggravated by the COVID-19 pandemic leads to impacts on physical activity (PA) and can contribute to the development [...] Read more.
Lockdown resulting from the pandemic led to a change in the health habits of the computer workers community. Sedentary work, together with less active lifestyles, aggravated by the COVID-19 pandemic leads to impacts on physical activity (PA) and can contribute to the development of musculoskeletal symptoms (MSS). Aim(s): Understand the effects of lockdown on the perception of physical activity levels and on the perception of frequency of musculoskeletal symptoms, over periods of 12 months and 7 days, in computer workers. Methods: Longitudinal comparative study between 2019 (M1) and 2021 (M2), over 18 months, in 40 volunteer participants. The inclusion criteria were full-time workers aged between 18 and 65 and the exclusion criteria included diagnosis of non-work-related medical conditions. In addition to a socio-demographic questionnaire, the Nordic musculoskeletal questionnaire (NMQ) was used to evaluate the MSS and the International Physical Activity Questionnaire (IPAQ), was used to analyse the perception of the level of PA. These questionnaires were used in two assessment stages (M1 and M2). McNemar test and Wilcoxon paired test were used to evaluate the effect of lockdown on the perception of PA, and on the perception of frequency of musculoskeletal symptoms. Results: The MSS prevalence in the previous 12 months increased significantly in the neck (M1: 45.0%, M2: 62.5%, p = 0.046), in the shoulders (M1: 37.5%, M2: 55.0%, p = 0.033), and in the hands/wrists (M1: 25.0%, M2: 45.0%, p = 0.019). The mean pain score increased in the shoulders (1.43 ± 2.24, 2.35 ± 2.55, p = 0.003) and in the elbows (0.18 ± 0.59, 0.60 ± 1.34, p = 0.015). No differences were found in the PA between M1 and M2, but the weekly mean sitting time increased from 4.75 ± 2.26 to 6.26 ± 2.65 (p < 0.001). Conclusion: After 18 months it became clear that MSS perception increased mainly in the neck, shoulders and hands/wrists with a significant increase in pain intensity in the shoulder and elbow regions. The weekly sitting time increased significantly. Further studies are needed in order to determine the impact of teleworking in a pandemic context. But multifactor behind these results should be taken into account by health institutions and those responsible for the Prevention of Occupational Risks in Computer Workers in order to adopt educational strategies for the promotion of Physical activity (PA), in these workers. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Current Insights in Promoting Well-Being at Work)
Show Figures

Figure 1

16 pages, 793 KiB  
Article
Positive Effects of an Online Workplace Exercise Intervention during the COVID-19 Pandemic on Quality of Life Perception in Computer Workers: A Quasi-Experimental Study Design
by Sara Moreira, Maria Begoña Criado, Maria Salomé Ferreira, Jorge Machado, Carla Gonçalves, Filipe Manuel Clemente, Cristina Mesquita, Sofia Lopes and Paula Clara Santos
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2022, 19(5), 3142; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph19053142 - 7 Mar 2022
Cited by 13 | Viewed by 3368
Abstract
Computer workers’ sedentary work, together with less active lifestyles, aggravated by the COVID-19 pandemic, represents a high risk for many chronic diseases, leading to a decrease in health-related quality of life (QoL). Workplace exercises consist of a set of physical exercises, implemented during [...] Read more.
Computer workers’ sedentary work, together with less active lifestyles, aggravated by the COVID-19 pandemic, represents a high risk for many chronic diseases, leading to a decrease in health-related quality of life (QoL). Workplace exercises consist of a set of physical exercises, implemented during work breaks, that have multiple benefits for workers’ health. Aim: To assess the impact of online workplace exercises on computer workers’ perception of quality of life. Methods: Quasi-experimental study with two groups: a control group (n = 26) and an intervention group (n = 13). The inclusion criteria were that participants must be aged between 18 and 65 years old and the exclusion criteria included diagnosis of non-work-related medical conditions. The interventions consisted of workplace exercises, which were applied for 17 consecutive weeks, each session lasting 15 min, three times a week. The exercise programme, performed online and guided by a physiotherapist, consisted of mobility exercises, flexibility and strength exercises, with the help of a TheraBand® for elastic resistance. The control group were not subjected to any intervention. A socio-demographic questionnaire and the Health Survey Questionnaire (SF-36v2) were used in two assessment stages (M0—baseline and M1—final of intervention). A mixed ANOVA with interaction time*group was used to evaluate the effect of the exercise programme. Results: A good perception of the QoL was obtained in both stages. The exercise programme had a positive effect in the domains of Pain (ptime*group = 0.012, η2p = 0.158), Physical Function (ptime*group = 0.078, η2p = 0.082), Physical Performance (ptime*group = 0.052, η2p = 0.098), and Emotional Performance (ptime*group = 0.128, η2p = 0.061). Conclusion: After 17 weeks of workplace exercises, it became clear that the intervention group positively increased their QoL perception, with this improvement being significant in the Pain domain, which resulted in an improvement in their health condition. Therefore, further studies are needed to determine the optimal exercise for CWs, with detailed exercise types, different intensities and focused on various health conditions. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Current Insights in Promoting Well-Being at Work)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Review

Jump to: Research

18 pages, 591 KiB  
Review
Interventions to Facilitate Return to Work after Stroke: A Systematic Review
by Gemma Pearce, Joan O’Donnell, Rebecca Pimentel, Elizabeth Blake and Lynette Mackenzie
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2023, 20(15), 6469; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph20156469 - 28 Jul 2023
Cited by 3 | Viewed by 1481
Abstract
Purpose: To gather knowledge about effective return to work interventions for survivors of stroke. Methods: A database search was conducted in MEDLINE, CINAHL, PsycINFO, Scopus, and Web of Science using keywords and medical subject headings. Studies were included if they met the following [...] Read more.
Purpose: To gather knowledge about effective return to work interventions for survivors of stroke. Methods: A database search was conducted in MEDLINE, CINAHL, PsycINFO, Scopus, and Web of Science using keywords and medical subject headings. Studies were included if they met the following criteria: (i) studies published in English since the year 2000; (ii) adult patients aged 18–65 with a primary diagnosis of stroke; (iii) working pre-stroke; and (iv) intervention in which one of the primary outcomes is return to work. The methodological quality of included studies was assessed and the evidence synthesised. Results: Twelve studies were included, of which three were randomised controlled trials, four were retrospective studies, one was a cohort study, one was an explorative longitudinal study, one was a pre-post treatment observation study and two were pilot studies. The employment rate at follow-up ranged from 7% to 75.6%. Overall, there was limited published evidence regarding the effectiveness of interventions to promote return to work for this population, and it was unclear if return to pre-stroke work was the goal. Conclusion: A lack of large, controlled trials, variations in follow-up time and the definitions of return to work accounted for the large range of employment rates at follow-up. There is limited published high-quality evidence regarding the effectiveness of interventions to promote return to work in working-age survivors of stroke. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Current Insights in Promoting Well-Being at Work)
Show Figures

Figure 1

26 pages, 1949 KiB  
Review
The Mediating Effects of Work Characteristics on the Relationship between Transformational Leadership and Employee Well-Being: A Meta-Analytic Investigation
by Friederike Teetzen, Paul-Christian Bürkner, Sabine Gregersen and Sylvie Vincent-Höper
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2022, 19(5), 3133; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph19053133 - 7 Mar 2022
Cited by 16 | Viewed by 4586
Abstract
Evidence points to an indirect relationship between transformational leadership (TFL) and employee well-being, and numerous work characteristics have been identified as mediators. However, the relative mediating effect of different types of job resources and job demands on the TFL–well-being relationship remains unclear, rendering [...] Read more.
Evidence points to an indirect relationship between transformational leadership (TFL) and employee well-being, and numerous work characteristics have been identified as mediators. However, the relative mediating effect of different types of job resources and job demands on the TFL–well-being relationship remains unclear, rendering it impossible to determine which ones are the most influential. This study aims to provide a comprehensive analysis of the relative mediation potential of different work characteristics in the TFL–well-being relationship in multiple three-level meta-analytical structural equation models of 243 samples. Based on the JD–R Model, this study extends this theoretical framework by suggesting TFL as a predisposing variable that influences both job resources and job demands, leading to changes in indicators of both positive and negative employee well-being. The results show that, while all the examined job resources and demands mediated the TFL–well-being relationship, organizational resources were identified as the strongest mediators. Furthermore, job demands had a strong mediating effect on the relationship between TFL and negative well-being, while job resources more strongly mediated TFL and positive well-being. We present a differentiated picture of how transformational leaders can influence their employees’ well-being at the workplace, providing valuable knowledge for future research and practice. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Current Insights in Promoting Well-Being at Work)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Back to TopTop