Special Issue "Genetic and Environmental Influences on Maternal, Fetal and Neonatal Diseases"

A special issue of International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health (ISSN 1660-4601). This special issue belongs to the section "Global Health".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 December 2021.

Special Issue Editors

Dr. Kazumichi Fujioka
Website
Guest Editor
Department of Pediatrics, Kobe University Graduate School of Medicine, Kobe 650-0017, Japan
Interests: neonatology; perinatal infection; sepsis model; neonatal jaundice
Prof. Dr. Hans Van Rostenberghe
Website
Assistant Guest Editor
Department of Paediatrics, School of Medical Sciences, Universiti Sains Malaysia, 16150 Kubang Kerian, Kelantan, Malaysia
Interests: neonatology; neonatal jaundice; infection prevention; care for the underprivileged

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

This Special Issue of IJERPH, entitled “Genetic and Environmental Influences on Maternal, Fetal, and Neonatal Diseases”, offers an opportunity to publish high-quality research, reviews, and case series that further the understanding of the roles that the genetics and environment play in maternal, fetal, and neonatal health and well-being.

Despite recent advances in perinatal management, the number of low birth weight infants has been increased, especially in developed countries like Japan. The reason has been suggested to be increased numbers of fetal growth restrictions and preterm births by several recent studies. Both genetic and environmental factors, such as polymorphisms, epigenetics, diet, infections, mental well-being, socioeconomic status, and maternal complications, have been found to influence these perinatal morbidities, which might result in neonatal complications or even lead to neurodevelopmental impairment. In addition, prenatal and perinatal exposures to adverse environmental factors are known to be associated with the development of adult chronic diseases, or developmental origins of health and disease (DOHaD).

Thus, understanding how the various genetic and environmental factors that fetuses and neonates are exposed to affect their health and well-being has gained considerable attention in public health research. Accordingly, the aim of this Special Issue is to highlight the broad scope of novel and contemporary research focused on maternal, fetal, and neonatal health.

We welcome clinical, basic, and epidemiological research. Submissions that discuss new knowledge, developments, and innovations in the field of genetic and environmental determinants of mother and child health are particularly encouraged.

We invite you to submit articles on topics including, but not limited to, the following:

  • Identification of genetic and environmental factors that affect maternal, fetal, and neonatal health;
  • Long-term outcome in infants born to mothers with pregnancy complications;
  • Differences in the environment of mothers and their children between developing and developed countries;
  • Novel insight into developmental origins of health and disease;
  • Genetic susceptibility to perinatal diseases;
  • The impact of psychosocial problems in pregnancy and neonatal outcome;
  • Cultural differences in breast milk sharing for preterm babies;
  • Application of evidence-based medicine in the neonatal setting.

Dr. Kazumichi Fujioka
Prof. Dr. Hans Van Rostenberghe
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2300 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Genetics
  • Environment
  • Pregnancy complications
  • Fetal growth
  • Neonatal morbidities
  • Developmental origins of health and disease
  • Neurodevelopmental outcome
  • Infections
  • Socioeconomic status
  • Breastfeeding

Published Papers (1 paper)

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Research

Open AccessArticle
Neurodevelopmental Outcomes at 18 Months of Corrected Age for Late Preterm Infants Born at 34 and 35 Gestational Weeks
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2021, 18(2), 640; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph18020640 - 13 Jan 2021
Abstract
To date, the difference in neurodevelopmental outcomes between late preterm infants (LPI) born at 34 and 35 gestational weeks (LPI-34 and LPI-35, respectively) has not been elucidated. This retrospective study aimed to evaluate neurodevelopmental outcomes at 18 months of corrected age for LPI-34 [...] Read more.
To date, the difference in neurodevelopmental outcomes between late preterm infants (LPI) born at 34 and 35 gestational weeks (LPI-34 and LPI-35, respectively) has not been elucidated. This retrospective study aimed to evaluate neurodevelopmental outcomes at 18 months of corrected age for LPI-34 and LPI-35, and to elucidate factors predicting neurodevelopmental impairment (NDI). Records of all LPI-34 (n = 93) and LPI-35 (n = 121) admitted to our facility from 2013 to 2017 were reviewed. Patients with congenital or chromosomal anomalies, severe neonatal asphyxia, and without developmental quotient (DQ) data were excluded. Psychomotor development was assessed as a DQ using the Kyoto Scale of Psychological Development at 18 months of corrected age. NDI was defined as DQ < 80 or when severe neurodevelopmental problems made neurodevelopmental assessment impossible. We compared the clinical characteristics and DQ values between LPI-34 (n = 62) and LPI-35 (n = 73). To elucidate the factors predicting NDI at 18 months of corrected age, we compared clinical factors between the NDI (n = 17) and non-NDI (n = 118) groups. No significant difference was observed in DQ values at 18 months of corrected age between the groups in each area and overall. Among clinical factors, male sex, intraventricular hemorrhage (IVH), hyperbilirubinemia, and severe hyperbilirubinemia had a higher prevalence in the NDI group than in the non-NDI group, and IVH and/or severe hyperbilirubinemia showed the highest Youden Index values for predicting NDI. Based on the results of this study, we can conclude that no significant difference in neurodevelopmental outcomes at 18 months of corrected age was observed between LPI-34 and LPI-35. Patients with severe hyperbilirubinemia and/or IVH should be considered to be at high risk for developing NDI. Full article
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