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Understanding the Interplay between Genetic Predisposition and Environment on Chronic Disease

A special issue of International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health (ISSN 1660-4601). This special issue belongs to the section "Disease Prevention".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (31 May 2023) | Viewed by 3946

Special Issue Editor


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Guest Editor
Department of Pediatrics, College of Allied Health Sciences, University of Cincinnati, Cincinnati, OH 45221, USA
Interests: citizen science; health promotion; environmental health literacy; community-based participatory research; molecular epidemiology; clinical research; human papillomavirus
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Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Susceptibility to many chronic diseases is a result of both genetic makeup and environmental influences. Some individuals are born with disease-causing genes while others are at higher risk of acquiring chronic diseases given the influence of their diets, lifestyles, and/or the physical and social environments where they live, work, and play, on their genes. Moreover, there is growing evidence that environmental exposures may cause both DNA mutations that alter the DNA sequence of genes and epigenetic modifications, such as DNA methylation, histone modifications, and microRNA expression, that contribute to changes in genome function. Both types of changes may or may not lead to alterations in chronic disease risk. The meaning of such research is not easily translated or communicated to the lay public.

Accordingly, the aim of this Special Issue of IJERPH entitled, “Understanding the interplay between genetic predisposition and environment on chronic disease” is to not only highlight the broad scope of novel and contemporary research focused on the impact of the environment on genetic susceptibility for chronic disease, but also how it is communicated to the lay public. In addition to high-quality quantitative research studies and reviews evaluating the specific roles of gene-environment and epigenetic-environment interactions, we also welcome quantitative, qualitative, and mixed-methods research that seeks to educate the public (including students, patients, high-risk populations, and communities, particularly those that are under-resourced) about chronic disease risk in light of their potential or actual collective susceptibilities.  Submissions authored by interdisciplinary teams as well as those that have meaningfully engaged patients, populations, and/or communities in their studies, using CBPR and citizen science, are particularly encouraged.

We invite articles targeting common chronic diseases including, but not limited to, the following:

  • Cancer (all types)
  • Diabetes
  • Cardiovascular Disease
  • Asthma
  • Metabolic Syndrome/Obesity

Dr. Melinda S. Butsch Kovacic
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2500 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Published Papers (1 paper)

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Review

24 pages, 535 KiB  
Review
Prenatal and Perinatal Environmental Influences Shaping the Neonatal Immune System: A Focus on Asthma and Allergy Origins
by Azahara María García-Serna, Elena Martín-Orozco, Trinidad Hernández-Caselles and Eva Morales
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2021, 18(8), 3962; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph18083962 - 9 Apr 2021
Cited by 14 | Viewed by 3227
Abstract
It is suggested that programming of the immune system starts before birth and is shaped by environmental influences acting during critical windows of susceptibility for human development. Prenatal and perinatal exposure to physiological, biological, physical, or chemical factors can trigger permanent, irreversible changes [...] Read more.
It is suggested that programming of the immune system starts before birth and is shaped by environmental influences acting during critical windows of susceptibility for human development. Prenatal and perinatal exposure to physiological, biological, physical, or chemical factors can trigger permanent, irreversible changes to the developing immune system, which may be reflected in cord blood of neonates. The aim of this narrative review is to summarize the evidence on the role of the prenatal and perinatal environment, including season of birth, mode of delivery, exposure to common allergens, a farming environment, pet ownership, and exposure to tobacco smoking and pollutants, in shaping the immune cell populations and cytokines at birth in humans. We also discuss how reported disruptions in the immune system at birth might contribute to the development of asthma and related allergic manifestations later in life. Full article
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