Special Issue "Health Effects of Biogenic Volatile Organic Compounds in the Forest Air"

A special issue of International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health (ISSN 1660-4601). This special issue belongs to the section "Environmental Health".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 28 February 2022.

Special Issue Editors

Dr. Francesco Meneguzzo
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Institute for BioEconomy, National Research Council, 10 Via Madonna del Piano, I-50019 Sesto Fiorentino (FI), Italy
Interests: Bioactive compounds; Energy; Forest bathing; Green extraction; Health; Hydrodynamic cavitation; Pollution; Process yield; Volatile organic compounds
Special Issues and Collections in MDPI journals
Dr. Federica Zabini
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Institute for BioEconomy, National Research Council, 10 Via Madonna del Piano, I-50019 Sesto Fiorentino (FI), Italy
Interests: Bioactive compounds; Forest bathing; Green extraction; Health; Hydrodynamic cavitation; Pollution; Science communication; Social behavior; Volatile organic compounds

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

This Special Issue intends to cover the emerging field of ecosystem services offered by forests for human health, focusing on biogenic volatile organic compounds (BVOCs), with specific reference to monoterpenes, and will include the following areas: relationships between BVOCs and key physiological health parameters, such as oxidative status, antioxidant/oxidant balance, indicators of the state of the immune system such as natural killer (NK) cells, as well as blood pressure, heart rate variability, salivary cortisol, etc.; relationships among the abovementioned key physiological health parameters and psychological health parameters, such as inferred from the administration of professional questionnaires, and in turn the relationship with BVOCs; dose-dependent responses of the above-mentioned effects; dependence of BVOC chemistry on air quality parameters: formation of secondary organic aerosol (SOA) and countereffects on health; time- and space-distributed mapping of BVOCs and their chemical composition, and relationships with season, meteorological parameters, forest composition, etc.; qualification of sites and hiking trials based on BVOCs concentration and chemical composition; policy recommendations: forest management, maintenance and expansion of valuable hiking trails and shelters, health prescriptions, etc. The expected submissions will be research articles, reviews, and case reports.

Dr. Francesco Meneguzzo
Dr. Federica Zabini
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2300 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • air quality
  • biogenic volatile organic compounds
  • forests
  • forest management
  • health
  • hiking trails
  • immune system
  • medical prescriptions
  • monoterpenes

Published Papers (6 papers)

Order results
Result details
Select all
Export citation of selected articles as:

Research

Jump to: Review, Other

Article
Forest Bathing Always Makes Sense: Blood Pressure-Lowering and Immune System-Balancing Effects in Late Spring and Winter in Central Europe
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2021, 18(4), 2067; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph18042067 - 20 Feb 2021
Viewed by 906
Abstract
Various formats of forest bathing have been receiving increasing attention owing to their perspectives in health promotion and the treatment of chronic lifestyle diseases. The majority of field studies are still being conducted in the Far Eastern region, and they often make psychological [...] Read more.
Various formats of forest bathing have been receiving increasing attention owing to their perspectives in health promotion and the treatment of chronic lifestyle diseases. The majority of field studies are still being conducted in the Far Eastern region, and they often make psychological assessments mainly in the green season. In our pretest–posttest field experiment, twelve healthy, working-age volunteers participated in a 2-h leisurely forest walking program, first in the green season (May) and then in the winter season (January), in the Mecsek Hills, next to Pécs, Hungary. Systolic blood pressure decreased after the trips both in late spring and in the winter. Based on changes in the expressions of CD69, an early activation marker, NKG2D, a major recognition receptor, perforin, granzyme B, and TIM-3, an inhibitory immune checkpoint molecule, on CD8+ cytotoxic T, NK, NKdim, NKbright, and NKT cells, we detected the stimulation of NKbright cells and activation of all examined immune cell subsets in the green season. In the winter, a slight activating and an interesting balancing effect regarding TIM-3 could be observed considering our finding that basal (pretest) TIM-3 expression by NK cells was significantly lower in the winter. Our work expands the knowledge on and potentials of forest medicine. Full article
Show Figures

Figure 1

Article
Comparative Study of the Restorative Effects of Forest and Urban Videos during COVID-19 Lockdown: Intrinsic and Benchmark Values
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2020, 17(21), 8011; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph17218011 - 30 Oct 2020
Cited by 5 | Viewed by 1966
Abstract
The prolonged lockdown imposed to contain the COrona VIrus Disease 19 COVID-19 pandemic prevented many people from direct contact with nature and greenspaces, raising alarms for a possible worsening of mental health. This study investigated the effectiveness of a simple and affordable remedy [...] Read more.
The prolonged lockdown imposed to contain the COrona VIrus Disease 19 COVID-19 pandemic prevented many people from direct contact with nature and greenspaces, raising alarms for a possible worsening of mental health. This study investigated the effectiveness of a simple and affordable remedy for improving psychological well-being, based on audio-visual stimuli brought by a short computer video showing forest environments, with an urban video as a control. Randomly selected participants were assigned the forest or urban video, to look at and listen to early in the morning, and questionnaires to fill out. In particular, the State-Trait Anxiety Inventory (STAI) Form Y collected in baseline condition and at the end of the study and the Part II of the Sheehan Patient Rated Anxiety Scale (SPRAS) collected every day immediately before and after watching the video. The virtual exposure to forest environments showed effective to reduce perceived anxiety levels in people forced by lockdown in limited spaces and environmental deprivation. Although significant, the effects were observed only in the short term, highlighting the limitation of the virtual experiences. The reported effects might also represent a benchmark to disentangle the determinants of health effects due to real forest experiences, for example, the inhalation of biogenic volatile organic compounds (BVOC). Full article
Show Figures

Graphical abstract

Article
Human Breathable Air in a Mediterranean Forest: Characterization of Monoterpene Concentrations under the Canopy
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2020, 17(12), 4391; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph17124391 - 18 Jun 2020
Cited by 5 | Viewed by 2358
Abstract
Monoterpenes have been identified as potential determinants of the human health effects induced by forest exposure. The present study characterizes the total monoterpene concentrations at nose height in a Mediterranean Holm oak forest located in North-East Iberian Peninsula during the annual emission peak [...] Read more.
Monoterpenes have been identified as potential determinants of the human health effects induced by forest exposure. The present study characterizes the total monoterpene concentrations at nose height in a Mediterranean Holm oak forest located in North-East Iberian Peninsula during the annual emission peak (summer and autumn: June to November) using a Proton Transfer Reaction–Mass Spectrometry (PTR-MS). Results show a strong variability of the total monoterpene concentrations in season and daytime. The concentration peak appears during July and August. These two months displayed two average maxima in their diel cycles: One during early morning (from 6:00 to 8:00, 0.30 ppbv for July and 0.41 ppbv for August) and another one at early afternoon (from 13:00 to 15:00, 0.27 ppbv during July and 0.32 ppbv during August). Monoterpene concentrations were strongly related with the temperature (exponentially) and solar radiation (rectangular hyperbolic relationship). The concentrations registered here are similar or higher than in previous ex situ studies showcasing the effects of forests on human health. These findings provide relevant data for the scientific and healthcare community by improving the understanding of monoterpene dynamics at nose height and suggesting further research on the effects of forests on human health, particularly in the Mediterranean region. Full article
Show Figures

Figure 1

Review

Jump to: Research, Other

Review
Forest Volatile Organic Compounds and Their Effects on Human Health: A State-of-the-Art Review
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2020, 17(18), 6506; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph17186506 - 07 Sep 2020
Cited by 10 | Viewed by 4863
Abstract
The aim of this research work is to analyze the chemistry and diversity of forest VOCs (volatile organic compounds) and to outline their evidence-based effects on health. This research work was designed as a narrative overview of the scientific literature. Inhaling forest VOCs [...] Read more.
The aim of this research work is to analyze the chemistry and diversity of forest VOCs (volatile organic compounds) and to outline their evidence-based effects on health. This research work was designed as a narrative overview of the scientific literature. Inhaling forest VOCs like limonene and pinene can result in useful antioxidant and anti-inflammatory effects on the airways, and the pharmacological activity of some terpenes absorbed through inhalation may be also beneficial to promote brain functions by decreasing mental fatigue, inducing relaxation, and improving cognitive performance and mood. The tree composition can markedly influence the concentration of specific VOCs in the forest air, which also exhibits cyclic diurnal variations. Moreover, beneficial psychological and physiological effects of visiting a forest cannot be solely attributed to VOC inhalation but are due to a global and integrated stimulation of the five senses, induced by all specific characteristics of the natural environment, with the visual component probably playing a fundamental role in the overall effect. Globally, these findings can have useful implications for individual wellbeing, public health, and landscape design. Further clinical and environmental studies are advised, since the majority of the existing evidence is derived from laboratory findings. Full article
Show Figures

Graphical abstract

Other

Jump to: Research, Review

Systematic Review
Nature Exposure and Its Effects on Immune System Functioning: A Systematic Review
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2021, 18(4), 1416; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph18041416 - 03 Feb 2021
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 5362
Abstract
Given the drastic changes in our lifestyles and ecosystems worldwide, the potential health effects of natural environments have grown into a highly pervasive topic. Recent scientific findings suggest beneficial effects from nature exposure on human immune responses. This review aims at providing a [...] Read more.
Given the drastic changes in our lifestyles and ecosystems worldwide, the potential health effects of natural environments have grown into a highly pervasive topic. Recent scientific findings suggest beneficial effects from nature exposure on human immune responses. This review aims at providing a comprehensive overview of literature published on immunomodulatory effects of nature exposure by inhalation of natural substances. A systematic database search was performed in SCOPUS and PubMed. The quality and potential bias of included studies (n = 33) were assessed by applying the EPHPP (Effective Public Health Practice Project) tool for human studies and the ARRIVE (Animal Research: Reporting of In Vivo Experiments) and SYRCLE (Systematic Review Centre for Laboratory Animal Experimentation) tools for animal studies. The synthesis of reviewed studies points to positive effects of nature exposure on immunological health parameters; such as anti-inflammatory, anti-allergic, anti-asthmatic effects or increased NK (natural killer) cell activity. Decreased expression of pro-inflammatory molecules, infiltration of leukocytes and release of cytotoxic mediators are outcomes that may serve as a baseline for further studies. However, partially weak study designs evoked uncertainties about outcome reproducibility and key questions remain open concerning effect sizes, duration of exposure and contributions of specific vegetation or ecosystem types. Full article
Show Figures

Figure 1

Brief Report
Effects of a Forest Walk on Urinary Dityrosine and Hexanoyl-Lysine in Young People: A Pilot Study
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2020, 17(14), 4990; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph17144990 - 10 Jul 2020
Viewed by 817
Abstract
A few studies indicate exposure to forests may alleviate oxidative stress in the body. However, more evidence is needed to support this potentiality. The purpose of the current study aimed at examining whether there is any difference in urinary levels of oxidatively modified [...] Read more.
A few studies indicate exposure to forests may alleviate oxidative stress in the body. However, more evidence is needed to support this potentiality. The purpose of the current study aimed at examining whether there is any difference in urinary levels of oxidatively modified proteins or lipids—dityrosine (DT) and hexanoyl-lysine (HEL), respectively, after a forest or urban walk. The study was performed on 29 university students who took part in forest walks (Shinjo Village) in Okayama Prefecture of Japan and on 42 university students who took part in urban walks in the downtown area of Okayama City. Urine samples before and after the walks were analyzed for DT and HEL excretion. Air phytoncides during the walks were also measured. We found a decreased tendency in urinary DT and HEL (p < 0.05) in most participants after the forest walks, but not after the urban walks. We further found the total levels of air phytoncides in the forest field were 1.50 times higher compared with those in the urban field. This study suggests the possibility that regular immersion in a forest environment might contribute toward weakening of the oxidative modifications of proteins or lipids in the body. Full article
Show Figures

Figure 1

Back to TopTop