Topic Editors

Institute of Bioeconomy, National Research Council, 10 Via Madonna del Piano, I-50019 Sesto Fiorentino, FI, Italy
Institute of Bioeconomy, National Research Council of Italy, 10 Via Madonna del Piano, I-50019 Florence, Italy

Advances in Hydrodynamic Cavitation Applications for Environment and Human Health

Abstract submission deadline
closed (15 July 2023)
Manuscript submission deadline
closed (30 September 2023)
Viewed by
11810

Topic Information

Dear Colleagues,

Controlled hydrodynamic cavitation methods and related technologies are increasingly recognized as comparatively more efficient, affordable, feasible, and straightforwardly scalable in many different technical fields in which the acceleration of physical, chemical, and biological reactions in fluid streams is necessary. The scope of this Topic concerns advanced applications of hydrodynamic cavitation with proven scalability up to the full scale and proven comparatively higher process yield, across at least the following fields:

  • green extraction of natural products;
  • creation of new, improved, or functionalized products for environmental protection and human health promotion;
  • food preservation and enhancement;
  • purification and disinfection of waste streams;
  • enhancement of biogas, bioethanol, and biodiesel generation.

Further fields could be of interest, as long as they focus on the environment and human health. Raw materials, either primary products, byproducts, waste streams, or underutilized resources, should be generally available in fairly large quantities and concentrated, in order to pursue industrial application and really make a difference. The scope of this Topic further includes structural, physicochemical, biological, and functional analysis of the products and byproducts of the above-listed hydrodynamic cavitation applications and processes. New ideas about hydrodynamic cavitation devices and methods are also welcome, provided that clear advantages and straightforward upscaling are shown.

Dr. Federica Zabini
Dr. Francesco Meneguzzo
Topic Editors

Keywords

  • bioactive compounds
  • energy
  • environmental protection
  • food
  • green extraction
  • health
  • hydrodynamic cavitation
  • nutrients
  • waste management

Participating Journals

Journal Name Impact Factor CiteScore Launched Year First Decision (median) APC
Antioxidants
antioxidants
7.0 8.8 2012 13.9 Days CHF 2900
Foods
foods
5.2 5.8 2012 13.1 Days CHF 2900
International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health
ijerph
- 5.4 2004 29.6 Days CHF 2500
Processes
processes
3.5 4.7 2013 13.7 Days CHF 2400
Energies
energies
3.2 5.5 2008 16.1 Days CHF 2600

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Published Papers (5 papers)

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19 pages, 3417 KiB  
Article
Antioxidant Phytocomplexes Extracted from Pomegranate (Punica granatum L.) Using Hydrodynamic Cavitation Show Potential Anticancer Activity In Vitro
by Antonella Minutolo, Angelo Gismondi, Rossella Chirico, Gabriele Di Marco, Vita Petrone, Marialaura Fanelli, Alessia D’Agostino, Antonella Canini, Sandro Grelli, Lorenzo Albanese, Mauro Centritto, Federica Zabini, Claudia Matteucci and Francesco Meneguzzo
Antioxidants 2023, 12(8), 1560; https://doi.org/10.3390/antiox12081560 - 04 Aug 2023
Cited by 3 | Viewed by 1307
Abstract
Hydrodynamic cavitation (HC), as an effective, efficient, and scalable extraction technique for natural products, could enable the affordable production of valuable antioxidant extracts from plant resources. For the first time, whole pomegranate (Punica granatum L.) fruits, rich in bioactive phytochemicals endowed with [...] Read more.
Hydrodynamic cavitation (HC), as an effective, efficient, and scalable extraction technique for natural products, could enable the affordable production of valuable antioxidant extracts from plant resources. For the first time, whole pomegranate (Punica granatum L.) fruits, rich in bioactive phytochemicals endowed with anti-cancer properties, were extracted in water using HC. Aqueous fractions sequentially collected during the process (M1–M5) were lyophilized (L), filtered (A), or used as such, i.e., crude (C), and analyzed for their biochemical profile and in vitro antioxidant power. The fractions M3 and M4 from the L and C series showed the highest antiradical activity and phytochemical content. While the lyophilized form is preferable for application purposes, sample L-M3, which was produced faster and with lower energy consumption than M4, was used to assess the potential antiproliferative effect on human breast cancer line (AU565-PAR) and peripheral blood mononuclear (PBMC) cells from healthy donors. In a pilot study, cell growth, death, and redox state were assessed, showing that L-M3 significantly reduced tumor cell proliferation and intracellular oxygen reactive species. No effect on PBMCs was detected. Thus, the antioxidant phytocomplex extracted from pomegranate quickly (15 min), at room temperature (30 °C), and efficiently showed potential anticancer activity without harming healthy cells. Full article
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23 pages, 5328 KiB  
Article
New Route to the Production of Almond Beverages Using Hydrodynamic Cavitation
by Cecilia Faraloni, Lorenzo Albanese, Graziella Chini Zittelli, Francesco Meneguzzo, Luca Tagliavento and Federica Zabini
Foods 2023, 12(5), 935; https://doi.org/10.3390/foods12050935 - 22 Feb 2023
Cited by 7 | Viewed by 2750
Abstract
Perceived as a healthy food, almond beverages are gaining ever-increasing consumer preference across nonalcoholic vegetable beverages, ranking in first place among oilseed-based drinks. However, costly raw material; time and energy consuming pre- and posttreatments such as soaking, blanching and peeling; and thermal sterilization [...] Read more.
Perceived as a healthy food, almond beverages are gaining ever-increasing consumer preference across nonalcoholic vegetable beverages, ranking in first place among oilseed-based drinks. However, costly raw material; time and energy consuming pre- and posttreatments such as soaking, blanching and peeling; and thermal sterilization hinder their sustainability, affordability and spread. Hydrodynamic cavitation processes were applied, for the first time, as a single-unit operation with straightforward scalability, to the extraction in water of almond skinless kernels in the form of flour and fine grains, and of whole almond seeds in the form of coarse grains, up to high concentrations. The nutritional profile of the extracts matched that of a high-end commercial product, as well as showing nearly complete extraction of the raw materials. The availability of bioactive micronutrients and the microbiological stability exceeded the commercial product. The concentrated extract of whole almond seeds showed comparatively higher antiradical activity, likely due to the properties of the almond kernel skin. Hydrodynamic cavitation-based processing might represent a convenient route to the production of conventional as well as integral and potentially healthier almond beverages, avoiding multiple technological steps, while affording fast production cycles and consuming less than 50 Wh of electricity per liter before bottling. Full article
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14 pages, 3422 KiB  
Review
Plant Extraction in Water: Towards Highly Efficient Industrial Applications
by Lorenzo Gallina, Christian Cravotto, Giorgio Capaldi, Giorgio Grillo and Giancarlo Cravotto
Processes 2022, 10(11), 2233; https://doi.org/10.3390/pr10112233 - 31 Oct 2022
Cited by 7 | Viewed by 2485
Abstract
Since the beginning of this century, the world has experienced a growing need for enabling techniques and more environmentally friendly protocols that can facilitate more rational industrial production. Scientists are faced with the major challenges of global warming and safeguarding water and food [...] Read more.
Since the beginning of this century, the world has experienced a growing need for enabling techniques and more environmentally friendly protocols that can facilitate more rational industrial production. Scientists are faced with the major challenges of global warming and safeguarding water and food quality. Organic solvents are still widely used and seem to be hard to replace, despite their enormous environmental and toxicological impact. The development of water-based strategies for the extraction of primary and secondary metabolites from plants on a laboratory scale is well documented, with several intensified processes being able to maximize the extraction power of water. Technologies, such as ultrasound, hydrodynamic cavitation, microwaves and pressurized reactors that achieve subcritical water conditions can dramatically increase extraction rates and yields. In addition, significant synergistic effects have been observed when using combined techniques. Due to the limited penetration depth of microwaves and ultrasonic waves, scaling up entails changes to reactor design. Nevertheless, the rich academic literature from laboratory-scale investigations may contribute to the engineering work involved in maximizing mass/energy transfer. In this article, we provide an overview of current and innovative techniques for solid-liquid extraction in water for industrial applications, where continuous and semi-continuous processes can meet the high demands for productivity, profitability and quality. Full article
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10 pages, 1601 KiB  
Article
Cardioprotective Effects of Grapefruit IntegroPectin Extracted via Hydrodynamic Cavitation from By-Products of Citrus Fruits Industry: Role of Mitochondrial Potassium Channels
by Lorenzo Flori, Lorenzo Albanese, Vincenzo Calderone, Francesco Meneguzzo, Mario Pagliaro, Rosaria Ciriminna, Federica Zabini and Lara Testai
Foods 2022, 11(18), 2799; https://doi.org/10.3390/foods11182799 - 11 Sep 2022
Cited by 6 | Viewed by 1789
Abstract
Citrus flavonoids are well-known for their beneficial effects at the cardiovascular and cardio-metabolic level, but often the encouraging in vitro results are not confirmed by in vivo approaches; in addition, the clinical trials are also inconsistent. Their limited bioavailability can be, at least [...] Read more.
Citrus flavonoids are well-known for their beneficial effects at the cardiovascular and cardio-metabolic level, but often the encouraging in vitro results are not confirmed by in vivo approaches; in addition, the clinical trials are also inconsistent. Their limited bioavailability can be, at least in part, the reason for these discrepancies. Therefore, many efforts have been made towards the improvement of their bioavailability. Hydrodynamic cavitation methods were successfully applied to the extraction of byproducts of the Citrus fruits industry, showing high process yields and affording stable phytocomplexes, known as IntegroPectin, endowed with great amounts of bioactive compounds and high water solubility. The cardioprotective effects of grapefruit IntegroPectin were evaluated by an ex vivo ischemia/reperfusion protocol. Further pharmacological characterization was carried out to assess the involvement of mitochondrial potassium channels. Grapefruit IntegroPectin, where naringin represented 98% of the flavonoids, showed anti-ischemic cardioprotective activity, which was better than pure naringenin (the bioactive aglycone of naringin). On cardiac-isolated mitochondria, this extract confirmed that naringenin/naringin were involved in the activation of mitochondrial potassium channels. The hydrodynamic cavitation-based extraction confirmed a valuable opportunity for the exploitation of Citrus fruits waste, with the end product presenting high levels of Citrus flavonoids and improved bioaccessibility that enhances its nutraceutical and economic value. Full article
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17 pages, 1728 KiB  
Article
Concentration, Health Risk, and Hydrological Forcing of Heavy Metals in Surface Water Following Water-Sediment Regulation of the Xiaolangdi Dam in the Yellow River
by Qinghe Zhao, Shengyan Ding, Zihan Geng, Xunling Lu, Zhendong Hong, Yi Liu and Jinhai Yu
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2022, 19(9), 5713; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph19095713 - 07 May 2022
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 1629
Abstract
Water and sediment regulation aimed at aquatic ecosystems and preserving reservoir capacity to minimize the negative consequences of dams can fundamentally change the distribution of heavy metals (HMs) in the reservoir and downstream reaches. However, the effects of water and sediment regulation on [...] Read more.
Water and sediment regulation aimed at aquatic ecosystems and preserving reservoir capacity to minimize the negative consequences of dams can fundamentally change the distribution of heavy metals (HMs) in the reservoir and downstream reaches. However, the effects of water and sediment regulation on variation in HMs are still poorly understood. In this study, the variations in concentration, contamination, human health risk, potential sources, and influencing factors of the metalloid As and HMs (Cr, Hg, Ni, Pb, and Zn) in surface water in the reservoir and the downstream reach of the Xiaolangdi Dam (XLD) following the operation of the water-sediment regulation scheme (WSRS) were determined. These results indicate that HM concentrations in the two post-WSRS seasons were much lower than the water quality standards, but were significantly increased over time due to the trapping effects of the XLD (p < 0.05, except for Zn). However, As concentration in the reservoir was significantly lower than that observed in downstream reaches, likely due to anthropogenic input from agricultural activities. Meanwhile, HM concentrations varied with distance to the dam, which displayed a distinct accumulation closer to the dam in the post-WSRS II season. The contamination of HMs, the carcinogenic risk of exposure to As, and the noncarcinogenic risks associated with exposure to Hg, Ni, Pb, and Zn via the direct ingestion pathway of drinking water were all within acceptable levels following the WSRS, but increased over time. The carcinogenic risk of Cr in the post-WSRS II season was at an unacceptably high level, particularly at sites near the dam. Hydrological characteristics (water level and flow rate) were the dominant factors in determining the distribution of HMs. These results can provide new insight for a better understanding of the variations in HMs following the water and sediment regulation practices, and guide future management in regulating the trapping effects of dams. Full article
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