Special Issue "Food Contaminants and Their Risk Assessment"

A special issue of International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health (ISSN 1660-4601). This special issue belongs to the section "Toxicology and Public Health".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 20 March 2021.

Special Issue Editors

Assoc. Prof. Dr. Ahmad Faizal Abdull Razis
Website
Guest Editor
Laboratory of Molecular Biomedicine, Institute of Bioscience, Universiti Putra Malaysia; Laboratory of Food Safety and Food Integrity, Institute of Tropical Agriculture and Food Security, Universiti Putra Malaysia; Department of Food Science, Faculty of Food Science and Technology, Universiti Putra Malaysia, 43400 UPM Serdang, Selangor, Malaysia
Interests: heavy metals; pesticide residues; polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs); microplastics
Prof. Dr. Gergely Tóth
Website
Guest Editor
Georgikon Faculty, University of Pannonia, 16., Deák F. u., 8360 Keszthely, and Agricultural Research Centre, Budapest Hermann Ottó út 15. Hungary
Interests: soil-food web interactions; risk assessment

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Food contamination by chemicals from the environment is a worldwide food safety issue, causing a tremendous threat to human health. These chemicals belong to many groups, such as metals/metalloids, persistent organic pollutants (POPs), polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), perfluorinated compounds (PFCs), pharmaceutical and personal care products (PPCPs), electronic waste, radioactive elements, plastics, and nanoparticles. Some of these occur naturally in the environment, while others are produced from anthropogenic sources. They may contaminate our food, including crops, livestock, seafood, and drinking water and exert adverse effects on our health. Therefore, it is vital to perform assessments of the associated potential risks. Monitoring contamination levels, enactment of control measures including remediation, and consideration of socio-political implications are important to provide safer food globally.

Dear Colleagues, I invite you to contribute on the basis of your experience in this Special Issue which aims to strengthen the knowledge on the typical and emerging food contaminants that impact on human health, for a more precise risk assessment.

Assoc. Prof. Dr. Ahmad Faizal Abdull Razis
Prof. Dr. Gergely Tóth
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2300 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Heavy metals
  • Pesticide residues
  • Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs)
  • Microplastics
  • Persistent organic pollutants (POPs)
  • Perfluorinated compounds (PFCs)
  • Soil threats
  • Risk assessment

Published Papers (4 papers)

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Research

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Open AccessArticle
Human Health Risk Assessment through Roasted Meats Consumption
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2020, 17(18), 6737; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph17186737 - 16 Sep 2020
Abstract
Data on the content of metals and metalloids in roasted meats with different types of wood and charcoal are still scarce in the literature. The concentrations of metals (Al, Cr, Cd, Cu, Fe, Mg, Mn, Mo, Ni, V, and Zn) and metalloid (As) [...] Read more.
Data on the content of metals and metalloids in roasted meats with different types of wood and charcoal are still scarce in the literature. The concentrations of metals (Al, Cr, Cd, Cu, Fe, Mg, Mn, Mo, Ni, V, and Zn) and metalloid (As) were determined by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-OES) after microwave digestion, and the estimated daily intake (EDI) for adults was assessed to determine the hazard quotient (HQ). The concentrations of Al, Cr, Cu, and Fe in raw meats were below the data obtained in other countries. The concentration of As (0.17 ± 0.42–0.23 ± 0.10 mg/kg), Mg (206.77 ± 3.99–291.95 ± 8.87 mg/kg), V (0.42 ± 0.14–6.66 ± 0.80 mg/kg), and Zn (6.66 ± 0.80–48.13 ± 0.56 mg/kg) in raw meats exceeded the values in the literature. The concentrations of Mg, As, Cr, Fe, V, and Zn are high when the meat is roasted using wood. All levels of Al, As, Cr, Cu, Fe, Mg, Mn, Mo, V, and Zn in raw meats are lower than those of meat roasted with coal and wood. The content of As in meat roasted with Chromed Copper Arsenate (CCA) wood (15.10 ± 0.27–26.25 ± 1.47 mg/kg) is higher than meat roasted with charcoal (0.46 ± 0.09–1.16 ± 0.50 mg/kg). EDI and HQ values revealed a minimal exposure of the adult population to those metals through roasted-meats consumption. However, EDI values of As in some roasted meats are above standard limits. Roast meats with wood showed higher levels of major and trace elements than meats roasted with coal. High exposures, in the long-term, may cause damage to health. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Food Contaminants and Their Risk Assessment)
Open AccessArticle
Assessment of Deoxynivalenol in Wheat, Corn and Its Products and Estimation of Dietary Intake
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2020, 17(15), 5602; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph17155602 - 03 Aug 2020
Cited by 1
Abstract
The main goal of the present research was to explore the seasonal variation of deoxynivalenol (DON) in wheat, corn, and their products, collected during 2018–2019. Samples of 449 of wheat and products and 270 samples of corn and their products were examined using [...] Read more.
The main goal of the present research was to explore the seasonal variation of deoxynivalenol (DON) in wheat, corn, and their products, collected during 2018–2019. Samples of 449 of wheat and products and 270 samples of corn and their products were examined using reverse-phase liquid chromatography with a UV detector. The findings of the present work showed that 104 (44.8%) samples of wheat and products from the summer season, and 91 (41.9%) samples from winter season were contaminated with DON (concentration limit of detections (LOD) to 2145 µg/kg and LOD to 2050 µg/kg), from summer and winter seasons, respectively. In corn and products, 87 (61.2%) samples from summer and 57 (44.5%) samples from winter season were polluted with DON with levels ranging from LOD to 2967 µg/kg and LOD to 2490 µg/kg, from the summer and winter season, respectively. The highest dietary intake of DON was determined in wheat flour 8.84 µg/kg body weight/day from the summer season, and 7.21 µg/kg body weight/day from the winter season. The findings of the work argued the need to implement stringent guidelines and create awareness among farmers, stakeholders, and traders of the harmful effect of DON. It is mostly observed that cereal crops are transported and stockpiled in jute bags, which may absorb moisture from the environment and produce favorable conditions for fungal growth. Therefore, these crops must store in polyethylene bags during transportation and storage, and moisture should be controlled. It is highly desirable to use those varieties that are more resistant to fungi attack. Humidity and moisture levels need to be controlled during storage and transportation. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Food Contaminants and Their Risk Assessment)
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Open AccessArticle
Health Risk Assessment of Dietary Heavy Metals Intake from Fruits and Vegetables Grown in Selected Old Mining Areas—A Case Study: The Banat Area of Southern Carpathians
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2020, 17(14), 5172; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph17145172 - 17 Jul 2020
Abstract
In this study, we conducted a noncarcinogenic risk assessment of consuming vegetables and fruits grown in two old mining areas from the Banat area of Southern Carpathians (Romania), Moldova Veche (M) and Rusca Montana (R) and in a nonpolluted reference area located near [...] Read more.
In this study, we conducted a noncarcinogenic risk assessment of consuming vegetables and fruits grown in two old mining areas from the Banat area of Southern Carpathians (Romania), Moldova Veche (M) and Rusca Montana (R) and in a nonpolluted reference area located near the village of Borlova (Ref). Concentrations of Fe, Mn, Zn, Cu, Ni, Cd and Pb in soils and commonly eaten vegetables and fruits were measured and used for calculating the weighted estimated daily intake of metals (WEDIM), the target hazard quotients (THQ) and the total target hazard quotients (TTHQ) for normal daily consumption in adults. Levels of certain metals in soils and plants from the R area (Pb) and the M area (Cu) were higher than those measured in the Ref area—and often exceeded normal or even alert-threshold levels. TTHQs for the R area (1.60; 6.03) and the M area (1.11; 2.54) were above one for leafy vegetables and root vegetables, respectively, suggesting a major risk of adverse health effects for diets, including these vegetal foodstuffs. Moreover, THQ and TTHQ indicated a higher population health risk for the R area than for the M area, with the Ref area being a safe zone. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Food Contaminants and Their Risk Assessment)
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Review

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Open AccessReview
Microplastics in Food: A Review on Analytical Methods and Challenges
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2020, 17(18), 6710; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph17186710 - 15 Sep 2020
Abstract
Human exposure to microplastics contained in food has become a significant concern owing to the increasing accumulation of microplastics in the environment. In this paper, we summarize the presence of microplastics in food and the analytical methods used for isolation and identification of [...] Read more.
Human exposure to microplastics contained in food has become a significant concern owing to the increasing accumulation of microplastics in the environment. In this paper, we summarize the presence of microplastics in food and the analytical methods used for isolation and identification of microplastics. Although a large number of studies on seafood such as fish and shellfish exist, estimating the overall human exposure to microplastics via food consumption is difficult owing to the lack of studies on other food items. Analytical methods still need to be optimized for appropriate recovery of microplastics in various food matrices, rendering a quantitative comparison of different studies challenging. In addition, microplastics could be added or removed from ingredients during processing or cooking. Thus, research on processed food is crucial to estimate the contribution of food to overall human microplastic consumption and to mitigate this exposure in the future. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Food Contaminants and Their Risk Assessment)
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