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Open AccessArticle

Human Health Risk Assessment through Roasted Meats Consumption

1
Group of Spectroscopy and Bioinformatics Applied to Biodiversity and Health, School of Medicine, Postgraduation Program in Health and Development in the Midwest Region, Faculty of Medicine, Federal University of Mato Grosso do Sul, Campo Grande MS 79079-900, Brazil
2
Faculty of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Food, and Nutrition, Federal University of Mato Grosso do Sul—UFMS, Campo Grande MS 79079-900, Brazil
3
Postgraduation Program in Health and Development in the Midwest Region, Faculty of Medicine, Federal University of Mato Grosso do Sul, Campo Grande MS 79079-900, Brazil
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2020, 17(18), 6737; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph17186737
Received: 10 August 2020 / Revised: 1 September 2020 / Accepted: 10 September 2020 / Published: 16 September 2020
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Food Contaminants and Their Risk Assessment)
Data on the content of metals and metalloids in roasted meats with different types of wood and charcoal are still scarce in the literature. The concentrations of metals (Al, Cr, Cd, Cu, Fe, Mg, Mn, Mo, Ni, V, and Zn) and metalloid (As) were determined by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-OES) after microwave digestion, and the estimated daily intake (EDI) for adults was assessed to determine the hazard quotient (HQ). The concentrations of Al, Cr, Cu, and Fe in raw meats were below the data obtained in other countries. The concentration of As (0.17 ± 0.42–0.23 ± 0.10 mg/kg), Mg (206.77 ± 3.99–291.95 ± 8.87 mg/kg), V (0.42 ± 0.14–6.66 ± 0.80 mg/kg), and Zn (6.66 ± 0.80–48.13 ± 0.56 mg/kg) in raw meats exceeded the values in the literature. The concentrations of Mg, As, Cr, Fe, V, and Zn are high when the meat is roasted using wood. All levels of Al, As, Cr, Cu, Fe, Mg, Mn, Mo, V, and Zn in raw meats are lower than those of meat roasted with coal and wood. The content of As in meat roasted with Chromed Copper Arsenate (CCA) wood (15.10 ± 0.27–26.25 ± 1.47 mg/kg) is higher than meat roasted with charcoal (0.46 ± 0.09–1.16 ± 0.50 mg/kg). EDI and HQ values revealed a minimal exposure of the adult population to those metals through roasted-meats consumption. However, EDI values of As in some roasted meats are above standard limits. Roast meats with wood showed higher levels of major and trace elements than meats roasted with coal. High exposures, in the long-term, may cause damage to health. View Full-Text
Keywords: toxic metals; chronic daily intake; human health risk assessment; ICP-OES; arsenic toxic metals; chronic daily intake; human health risk assessment; ICP-OES; arsenic
MDPI and ACS Style

Leite, L.C.S.; Melo, E.S.P.; Arakaki, D.G.; dos Santos, E.F.; do Nascimento, V.A. Human Health Risk Assessment through Roasted Meats Consumption. Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2020, 17, 6737.

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