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Fitness, Strength, and Exercise in Older Women

A special issue of International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health (ISSN 1660-4601). This special issue belongs to the section "Exercise and Health-Related Quality of Life".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (31 May 2024) | Viewed by 6014

Special Issue Editors


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Guest Editor
Research Group in Prevention and Health in Exercise and Sport (PHES), Department of Physical Education and Sports, University of Valencia, 46010 Valencia, Spain
Interests: pediatric exercise science; blood flow restriction; resistance training; clinical exercise
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Guest Editor
Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Perelman School of Medicine, University of Pennsylvania, Philadephia, PA 19104, USA
Interests: resistance training; pelvic floor muscle training, women’s health, exercise in clincal populations

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Guest Editor
Strength Training & Neuromuscular Performance Research Group, Faculty of Health and Wellbeing, Camilo José Cela University, 28692 Madrid, Spain
Interests: pediatric exercise; resistance training; blood flow restriction; exercise in clinical or special populations

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

The wide-ranging benefits of multicomponent training programs on health and quality of life in the elderly are well established. The specific particularities of the aging woman involve situations such as menopause, osteoporosis, urinary incontinence, and breast cancer among others. Therefore, the present special issue is oriented to expand the scientific knowledge about the acute and chronic effects of traditional exercise programs (e.g., multi-component, strength, cardiovascular, stretching, etc.), mind-body interventions (e.g., yoga, taichi, pilates, etc.) as well as new training techniques or technologies (e.g., blood flow restriction, hypopressive exercise, vibration training, etc.) on the conditions influencing the health and quality of life of the elderly woman.

Although the emphasis will be placed on specific conditions of the elderly woman, we will also take into account those manuscripts that study other factors such as the neuromuscular system (e.g., sarcopenia, dynapenia, cachexia, etc.), the cardiovascular system (risk of cardiovascular disease, metabolic system (e.g., metabolic flexibility, etc.), the neuro-cognitive system (e.g., self-perception, quality of life, Parkinson's, Alzheimer's, etc.) in the exercising elderly female.

This special issue it is now open to receive submissions of peer-reviewed articles (originals and/or reviews) for possible publication.

Prof. Dr. Ivan Chulvi-Medrano
Dr. Tamara Rial Rebullido
Dr. Diego Alexandre Alonso-Aubin
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2500 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • women
  • quality of life
  • health
  • wellness
  • physical activity
  • physical exercise
  • training

Published Papers (3 papers)

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Research

15 pages, 647 KiB  
Article
Effects of Microfiltered Seawater Intake and Variable Resistance Training on Strength, Bone Health, Body Composition, and Quality of Life in Older Women: A 32-Week Randomized, Double-Blinded, Placebo-Controlled Trial
by Alvaro Juesas, Pedro Gargallo, Javier Gene-Morales, Carlos Babiloni-López, Angel Saez-Berlanga, Pablo Jiménez-Martínez, Jose Casaña, Josep C. Benitez-Martinez, Rodrigo Ramirez-Campillo, Ivan Chulvi-Medrano and Juan C. Colado
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2023, 20(6), 4700; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph20064700 - 7 Mar 2023
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 2024
Abstract
The aim was to explore the effects of a 32-week resistance training (RT) intervention with elastic bands with or without microfiltered seawater (SW) supplementation on isokinetic strength, bone mineral density (BMD), body composition, and subjective quality of life in postmenopausal women. Ninety-three untrained [...] Read more.
The aim was to explore the effects of a 32-week resistance training (RT) intervention with elastic bands with or without microfiltered seawater (SW) supplementation on isokinetic strength, bone mineral density (BMD), body composition, and subjective quality of life in postmenopausal women. Ninety-three untrained women (age: 70.00 ± 6.26 years; body mass index: 22.05 ± 3.20 kg/m2; body fat: 37.77 ± 6.38%; 6.66 ± 1.01 s up-and-go test) voluntarily participated in this randomized, double-blinded, controlled trial. Participants were allocated into four groups (RT+SW, RT+PLA, CON+SW, and CON+PLA). The RT intervention (twice weekly) consisted of different exercises for the whole body performed at submaximal intensities with elastic bands. Both control groups were not involved in any exercise program. A two-way mixed analysis of variance of repeated measures revealed significant improvements in almost all the variables in both intervention groups (p < 0.05). However, significant differences with controls were encountered in isokinetic strength, body fat percentage, and bodily pain. Although the group with SW supplementation obtained greater effect sizes, non-significant differences between both RT groups were observed. In conclusion, the determinant factor of the adaptations seems to be RT rather than SW. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Fitness, Strength, and Exercise in Older Women)
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9 pages, 574 KiB  
Article
Potential Benefits of a Single Session of Remote Ischemic Preconditioning and Walking in Sedentary Older Adults: A Pilot Study
by Elena Muñoz-Gómez, Sara Mollà-Casanova, Núria Sempere-Rubio, Pilar Serra-Añó, Marta Aguilar-Rodríguez, Diego A. Alonso-Aubin, Iván Chulvi-Medrano and Marta Inglés
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2023, 20(4), 3515; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph20043515 - 16 Feb 2023
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Abstract
Ischemic preconditioning (IPC) has shown positive effects in endurance-type sports among healthy young individuals; however, its effects in endurance-type exercises in older adults have not been explored. We aimed to examine the acute effects of a single session of IPC prior to an [...] Read more.
Ischemic preconditioning (IPC) has shown positive effects in endurance-type sports among healthy young individuals; however, its effects in endurance-type exercises in older adults have not been explored. We aimed to examine the acute effects of a single session of IPC prior to an endurance-type exercise on cardiovascular- and physical-function-related parameters in sedentary older adults. A pilot study with a time-series design was carried out. Nine participants were enrolled consecutively in the following intervention groups: (i) SHAM (sham IPC + walking) and (ii) IPC (IPC + walking) groups. The main outcomes were resting systolic (SBP) and diastolic (DBP) blood pressure, heart rate (HR), peripheral oxygen saturation (SpO2), maximum isometric voluntary contraction (MIVC), endurance performance, and perceived fatigue. After the intervention, the IPC group showed a significant reduction in SBP, whereas SpO2 decreased in the SHAM group. The IPC group maintained quadriceps MIVC levels, whereas these levels dropped in the SHAM group. No changes in DBP, resting HR, endurance, or fatigue in any group were observed. These findings are of interest for the promotion of cardiovascular and physical health in older people. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Fitness, Strength, and Exercise in Older Women)
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13 pages, 1116 KiB  
Article
Comparing Fourteen Weeks of Multicomponent Training Versus Combined Training in Physically Inactive Older Women: A Randomized Trial
by Guilherme da Silva Rodrigues, Karine Pereira Rodrigues, Mariana Luciano de Almeida, Andressa Crystine da Silva Sobrinho, Natalia Yumi Noronha, Cicero Jonas Rodrigues Benjamim, Sabrina da Silva, Jhennyfer Aline Lima Rodrigues and Carlos Roberto Bueno Júnior
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2023, 20(3), 2699; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph20032699 - 2 Feb 2023
Cited by 4 | Viewed by 1809
Abstract
Background: Combined (CT) and multicomponent training (MT) presents several benefits for aging individuals. However, the literature does not provide evidence on which of the two physical training models can better enhance improvements in physical capacity and health parameters in middle-aged and older women. [...] Read more.
Background: Combined (CT) and multicomponent training (MT) presents several benefits for aging individuals. However, the literature does not provide evidence on which of the two physical training models can better enhance improvements in physical capacity and health parameters in middle-aged and older women. Objective: The aim of this study was to compare the effects of MT and CT on physical capacity, cognitive, behavioral, and psychosocial assessment, and biochemical profile of physically inactive women aged between 50 and 70 years. Methods: Participants were randomized into two groups: MT (32 women, 64.2 ± 6.4 years) and CT (39 women, 61.4 ± 4.3 years). Both training sessions had a weekly volume of 180 min, for 14 weeks, with assessments at baseline and after the training period. Results: CT showed better results when compared to MT. In the four evaluation blocks, we noticed differences in the effect size (L = large, M = moderate, S = small, and T = trivial) between the groups in 26 variables in total, highlighting the CT group (L = 11, M = 5, S = 2, and T = 8) compared to the MT group (L = 8, M = 7, S = 7, and T = 4). Our findings showed group-time differences for strength variables using the maximum dynamic repetition test in upper and lower limbs and for agility. The multicomponent training showed improvement in the functional strength of the upper limbs evaluated through the elbow flexion and extension test (p = 0.037), and HDL (p = 0.022). Conclusions: Fourteen weeks of CT showed better benefits when compared to MT. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Fitness, Strength, and Exercise in Older Women)
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