Special Issue "Evidence-Based Practice and Advanced Nursing Care"

Special Issue Editors

Dr. María Ruzafa-Martínez
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Faculty of Nursing, University of Murcia, 30100 Murcia, Spain
Interests: evidence-based practice; implementation science; nursing competency; nursing education; evaluation of the efficacy-effectiveness of nursing interventions
Dr. Jessica García González
E-Mail Website
Assistant Guest Editor
Faculty of Health and Social Sciences, University of Murcia, 30100 Murcia, Spain
Interests: nursing; pregnancy; anxiety; environmental exposure; pesticides; music therapy; evidence-based practice
Dr. Renata Zelenikova
E-Mail Website
Assistant Guest Editor
Institute of Nursing and Midwifery, Faculty of Medicine, University of Ostrava, 70300 Ostrava, Czech Republic
Interests: evidence-based practice; unfinished/missed nursing care; clinical nursing
Dr. Antonio Jesús Ramos-Morcillo
E-Mail Website
Assistant Guest Editor
Faculty of Nursing, University of Murcia, 30100 Murcia, Spain
Interests: evidence-based practice; implementation science; nursing competency; nursing education; evaluation of the efficacy-effectiveness of nursing interventions

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Evidence-based practice (EBP) is a problem-solving approach to clinical decision making that integrates the best available scientific evidence with clinical experience and patient preferences and values (Sacket et al. 2000). EBP is an instrument of great utility in making clinical decisions in nursing care, helping to reduce healthcare variability and cost in clinical practice, as well as to improve the quality of nursing care practice and patient health outcomes. Moreover, the importance of nursing education in EBP is recognized by the World Health Organization (WHO Regional Office for Europe, 2015). Nevertheless, there are multiple barriers for the relatively slow paradigm shift to EBP across the globe, and the incorporation of EBP into clinical nursing has been slow and remains a challenge to the profession.

This Special Issue focused on Evidence-based Practice and Advanced Nursing Care aims to provide nurses and midwives with current knowledge regarding EBP implementation interventions and strategies to avoid EBP barriers and to encourage the use of the EBP. Knowledge regarding nurses’ competency on EBP, and training and education interventions in undergraduate and postgraduate or continuing education in nursing and midwifery are also welcome. In addition, we are interested in research that studies the efficacy and effectiveness of nursing interventions in a broad clinical practice context to facilitate evidence-based decision making. Papers following the application of quantitative, qualitative or mixed-methods approaches will be considered.

We encourage submissions from all nurses and midwives researching in EBP and advanced interventions. We hope to be an open communication space that enhance dissemination and exchange of knowledge to a wider audience.

Dr. María Ruzafa-Martínez
Dr. Renata Zelenikova
Dr. Jessica García González
Dr. Antonio Jesús Ramos-Morcillo
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2300 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • evidence-based practice (EBP)
  • evidence-based nursing
  • nursing education on EBP
  • nursing knowledge implementation
  • nursing care
  • evaluation of the efficacy-effectiveness of nursing interventions
  • evidence-based midwifery
  • midwifery knowledge implementation

Published Papers (7 papers)

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Research

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Open AccessArticle
The Effectiveness of an Evidence-Based Practice (EBP) Educational Program on Undergraduate Nursing Students’ EBP Knowledge and Skills: A Cluster Randomized Control Trial
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2021, 18(1), 293; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph18010293 - 03 Jan 2021
Viewed by 1430
Abstract
Evidence-based practice (EBP) prevents unsafe/inefficient practices and improves healthcare quality, but its implementation is challenging due to research and practice gaps. A focused educational program can assist future nurses to minimize these gaps. This study aims to assess the effectiveness of an EBP [...] Read more.
Evidence-based practice (EBP) prevents unsafe/inefficient practices and improves healthcare quality, but its implementation is challenging due to research and practice gaps. A focused educational program can assist future nurses to minimize these gaps. This study aims to assess the effectiveness of an EBP educational program on undergraduate nursing students’ EBP knowledge and skills. A cluster randomized controlled trial was undertaken. Six optional courses in the Bachelor of Nursing final year were randomly assigned to the experimental (EBP educational program) or control group. Nursing students’ EBP knowledge and skills were measured at baseline and post-intervention. A qualitative analysis of 18 students’ final written work was also performed. Results show a statistically significant interaction between the intervention and time on EBP knowledge and skills (p = 0.002). From pre- to post-intervention, students’ knowledge and skills on EBP improved in both groups (intervention group: p < 0.001; control group: p < 0.001). At the post-intervention, there was a statistically significant difference in EBP knowledge and skills between intervention and control groups (p = 0.011). Students in the intervention group presented monographs with clearer review questions, inclusion/exclusion criteria, and methodology compared to students in the control group. The EBP educational program showed a potential to promote the EBP knowledge and skills of future nurses. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Evidence-Based Practice and Advanced Nursing Care)
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Open AccessArticle
Rationing of Nursing Care in Intensive Care Units
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2020, 17(19), 6944; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph17196944 - 23 Sep 2020
Viewed by 598
Abstract
The nursing practice refers to a wide range of tasks and responsibilities. In a situation where there is a problem of limited resources, nurses are forced to ration the patient’s care—that is, minimize and skip some tasks. The main purpose of this work [...] Read more.
The nursing practice refers to a wide range of tasks and responsibilities. In a situation where there is a problem of limited resources, nurses are forced to ration the patient’s care—that is, minimize and skip some tasks. The main purpose of this work was to assess the rationing level of nursing care among staff in the intensive care units. Methods: The research included 150 anaesthesiological nurses in the Silesian Region in Poland. The research was conducted from July to October 2019 using the standardized Perceived Implicit Rationing of Nursing Care (PRINCA) questionnaire on rationing nursing care, assessing the quality of patient care, and job satisfaction. The Modified Fatigue Impact Scale (MFIS) standardized questionnaire was used to assess the level of fatigue of respondents in the physical, cognitive, and psychosocial spheres. Results: Sociodemographic factors, such as gender, age, place of residence, education, seniority, and type of employment were not found to affect the rationing level of nursing care in the intensive care unit. The average quality of patient care was 6.05/10 points, while the average job satisfaction rating was 7.13/10 points. Analysis of the MFIS questionnaire showed that respondents experienced fatigue between “rare” and “sometimes”, and nursing staff fatigue was the main factor for rationing care. Conclusions: The higher the level of fatigue, the greater the rationing of care and the less satisfaction from work. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Evidence-Based Practice and Advanced Nursing Care)
Open AccessArticle
Effects of Self-Efficacy, Depression, and Anger on Health-Promoting Behaviors of Korean Elderly Women with Hypertension
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2020, 17(17), 6296; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph17176296 - 29 Aug 2020
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 960
Abstract
The prevalence of hypertension among women in Korea aged 65 years or older is 61.7%. Past research has emphasized the importance of health-promoting behaviors in hypertension management for the elderly. The purpose of this cross-sectional study was to identify the effects of self-efficacy, [...] Read more.
The prevalence of hypertension among women in Korea aged 65 years or older is 61.7%. Past research has emphasized the importance of health-promoting behaviors in hypertension management for the elderly. The purpose of this cross-sectional study was to identify the effects of self-efficacy, depression, trait anger, and anger expression on the health-promoting behaviors of elderly women with hypertension. Self-report questionnaires were completed by 208 women aged 65 and older (age range: 65 to 85) diagnosed with hypertension by physicians and living in the communities of G city and N city of Gyeonggi-do in South Korea. A hierarchical regression analysis revealed that exercise (β = 0.36, p < 0.001) had the most significant effect on health-promoting behaviors, followed by depression (β = −0.31, p < 0.001), trait anger (β = 0.21, p = 0.002), anger control (β = 0.20, p < 0.001), religion (β = 0.18, p = 0.001), and self-efficacy (β = 0.18, p = 0.003). Trait anger and anger control were identified to have a more significant effect on health-promoting behaviors than self-efficacy. Thus, health-promoting behaviors were influenced by exercise, depression, anger, religion, and self-efficacy. It is necessary to implement a nursing intervention strategy which pays attention to these factors to improve health-promoting behaviors of Korean community-dwelling elderly women. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Evidence-Based Practice and Advanced Nursing Care)
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Open AccessArticle
Barriers Perceived by Managers and Clinical Professionals Related to the Implementation of Clinical Practice Guidelines for Breastfeeding through the Best Practice Spotlight Organization Program
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2020, 17(17), 6248; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph17176248 - 27 Aug 2020
Viewed by 801
Abstract
International institutions facilitate the contact of health professionals to evidence-based recommendations for promoting exclusive breast feeding (BF). However, the achievement of good rates of exclusive BF is still far from the optimum. The intention of the present work is to determine the barriers [...] Read more.
International institutions facilitate the contact of health professionals to evidence-based recommendations for promoting exclusive breast feeding (BF). However, the achievement of good rates of exclusive BF is still far from the optimum. The intention of the present work is to determine the barriers identified by managers and health professionals involved in the implementation and sustainability of Clinical Practice Guidelines (CPG) for breastfeeding under the auspices of the Best Practice Spotlight Organization program. A qualitative research study was carried out. The participants were managers, healthcare assistants, nurses, midwives, pediatricians and gynecologists. Semi-structured interviews were conducted which were transcribed and analyzed using the six steps of thematic analysis. Twenty interviews were conducted, which defined four major themes: (1) Lack of resources and their adaptation; (2) Where, Who and How; (3) Dissemination and reach of the project to the professionals; and (4) The mother and her surroundings. This research identifies the barriers perceived by the health professionals involved in the implementation, with the addition of the managers as well. Novel barriers appeared such as the ambivalent role of the midwives and the fact that this CPG is about promoting health. The efforts for promoting the implementation program should be continuous, and the services should be extended to primary care. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Evidence-Based Practice and Advanced Nursing Care)
Open AccessArticle
Young Nursing Student’s Knowledge and Attitudes about Contraceptive Methods
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2020, 17(16), 5869; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph17165869 - 13 Aug 2020
Viewed by 756
Abstract
Purpose: Adolescence is considered a period in which individuals are particularly at risk of negative consequences related to sexual health. Increased knowledge levels have traditionally been used as an indicator of the effectiveness of educational programs, but attitudes are not addressed and are [...] Read more.
Purpose: Adolescence is considered a period in which individuals are particularly at risk of negative consequences related to sexual health. Increased knowledge levels have traditionally been used as an indicator of the effectiveness of educational programs, but attitudes are not addressed and are a key element for the success of such programs. The aim of this study is to determine the level of knowledge and attitudes toward the use of contraceptive methods among nursing students. A multicenter cross-sectional study was carried out. In total, 2914 university students (aged 18–25 years) enrolled in the study. Participants completed two validated scales to measure knowledge level and attitudes toward contraceptive use. Nursing degree students who received training about contraceptives obtained a success rate of over 70%, compared to 15.3% among students who had not received such training (p < 0.001). The mean attitude score was 43.45 points (10–50), but there were no significant differences in terms of student training (p = 0.435), although they were significantly higher among students who used contraceptives at first or last sexual intercourse (p < 0.001). There was a significant weak correlation between the level of knowledge and attitudes toward the use of contraceptives. An adequate level of knowledge about sexuality and contraceptive methods does not correspond to positive attitudes toward their use, although having an excellent attitude toward contraceptive use is related to their use during youth and adolescence. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Evidence-Based Practice and Advanced Nursing Care)
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Review

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Open AccessReview
A Systematic Review to Examine the Evidence in Developing Social Prescribing Interventions That Apply a Co-Productive, Co-Designed Approach to Improve Well-Being Outcomes in a Community Setting
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2021, 18(8), 3896; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph18083896 - 08 Apr 2021
Viewed by 564
Abstract
This systematic review aims to investigate the evidence in applying a co-design, co-productive approach to develop social prescribing interventions. A growing body of evidence suggests that co-production and co-design are methods that can be applied to engage service users as knowledgeable assets who [...] Read more.
This systematic review aims to investigate the evidence in applying a co-design, co-productive approach to develop social prescribing interventions. A growing body of evidence suggests that co-production and co-design are methods that can be applied to engage service users as knowledgeable assets who can contribute to developing sustainable health services. Applying the Preferred Reporting Items for Systemic Reviews and Meta-Analyses (PRISMA) guidelines, a systematic literature search was conducted. Peer-reviewed articles were sought using electronic databases, experts and grey literature. The review search concluded with eight observational studies. Quality appraisal methods were influenced by the Grades of Recommendation, Assessment, Development and Evaluation (GRADE) Framework approach. A narrative thematic synthesis of the results was conducted. The evidence suggests that a co-design and co-productive social prescribing can lead to positive well-being outcomes among communities. Barriers and facilitators of co-production and co-design approach were also highlighted within the evidence. The evidence within this review confirms that a co-production and co-design would be an effective approach to engage stakeholders in the development and implementation of a SP intervention within a community setting. The evidence also implies that SP initiatives can be enhanced from the outset, by drawing on stakeholder knowledge to design a service that improves health and well-being outcomes for community members. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Evidence-Based Practice and Advanced Nursing Care)
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Open AccessReview
Educational Interventions for Teaching Evidence-Based Practice to Undergraduate Nursing Students: A Scoping Review
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2020, 17(17), 6351; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph17176351 - 31 Aug 2020
Viewed by 1423
Abstract
Background: Evidence-based practice (EBP) is the appropriate approach to guide healthcare personnel in their clinical practice. Despite the importance of EBP, undergraduate nursing students are not very much engaged and have a lack of knowledge and skills. Aim: The aim of [...] Read more.
Background: Evidence-based practice (EBP) is the appropriate approach to guide healthcare personnel in their clinical practice. Despite the importance of EBP, undergraduate nursing students are not very much engaged and have a lack of knowledge and skills. Aim: The aim of this study was to gather, assess and synthesize evidence on educational interventions promoting evidence-based practice competencies in traditional undergraduate nursing students. Methods: This is a scoping review on sixteen English and non-English databases. A data extraction form was established including authors, year of publication, country, types of participant, specific objectives, study design, educational intervention, comparison if existed, and outcomes of significance. Results: The search strategy retrieved 8901 records in total. After screening for duplicates and eligibility, 20 articles were included in the qualitative synthesis. Improvement in EBP domains such as knowledge, skills, attitudes/behaviours, EBP beliefs, use, practice, level of evidence, critical thinking and future use of EBP were mentioned and assessed in different studies. Conclusions: EBP training can improve nursing students’ capacity in healthcare provision. Teaching EBP competencies along undergraduate nursing curricula should be a high priority at nursing programmes. The use of innovative approaches seems to be more effective than traditional ways. Education of EBP increases its future use and critical thinking and EBP programs improve self-efficacy and the level of evidence utilization. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Evidence-Based Practice and Advanced Nursing Care)
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