Special Issue "Advances in Viticulture Production"

A special issue of Horticulturae (ISSN 2311-7524). This special issue belongs to the section "Viticulture".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 July 2021.

Special Issue Editor

Prof. Dr. Massimo Bertamini
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Center of Agriculture, Food & Environment (C3A), University of Trento, via Mach 1, 38019 San Michele a/A, Italy (TN)
Interests: abiotic stress; arboriculture; biodiversity; cultivation techniques; fruit maturation; grapevine; plant physiology; viticulture

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

In arboriculture, the vine is one of the most cultivated plants. The total surface planted globally is estimated at 7.5 x 106 ha, and around 7.5 x 106 metric tons of grapes are produced annually (according to the OIV). Grapes are used as fresh (36%), raisins (7%), or for the production of wine (57%). Although global vineyard hectares have declined over the past 20 years, particularly in the Mediterranean area, grape production has increased progressively from 6.0 to 7.5 x 106 metric tons. Grape usage varies considerably from region to region, and from country to country. For example, most grapes grown in Europe are used in wine production, whereas in China or India grapes are mostly used as a fresh fruit crop. Two challenges concern the world of viticulture in years to come: (i) the sustainability of crops, and (ii) the contrast to climate change as a stressor.

Both challenges are difficult to overcome. The survival of some historic wine-growing regions could be at risk, and in particular the quality of production could be compromised or greatly modified.

The proposed Special Issue on “Advances in Viticulture production” aims to present advanced studies, methods, tools, and cutting-edge innovations applied in the field of grape production. I look forward receiving to your manuscripts and am eager to share your results with the community of researchers, students, technicians, winegrowers, and enthusiasts of the world of viticulture. Potential topics include, but are not limited to: new techniques to manage production factors; methods for the early estimation of yield and productivity; stress management and reduction of water consumption; integrated and organic management of pests, diseases, and weeds; IOT and DSS systems; precision viticulture for sustainable vineyard management; and automation and autonomous driving in viticulture mechanization.

Prof. Dr. Massimo Bertamini
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Horticulturae is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1400 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Precision viticulture
  • IOT and DSS system in viticulture
  • Automation and autonomous driving mechanization
  • Sustainable viticulture practices
  • New production techniques in viticulture
  • Yield and productivity estimation
  • Stress and water management
  • Pest, weed and disease management
  • Stress management and reduction of water consumption

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

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Article
Artificial Intelligence and Novel Sensing Technologies for Assessing Downy Mildew in Grapevine
Horticulturae 2021, 7(5), 103; https://doi.org/10.3390/horticulturae7050103 - 08 May 2021
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Abstract
Plant diseases and pests cause a large loss of world agricultural production. Downy mildew is a major disease in grapevine. Conventional techniques for plant diseases evaluations are time-consuming and require expert personnel. This work investigates novel sensing technologies and artificial intelligence applications for [...] Read more.
Plant diseases and pests cause a large loss of world agricultural production. Downy mildew is a major disease in grapevine. Conventional techniques for plant diseases evaluations are time-consuming and require expert personnel. This work investigates novel sensing technologies and artificial intelligence applications for assessing downy mildew in grapevine under laboratory conditions. In our methodology, machine vision is applied to assess downy mildew sporulation, while hyperspectral imaging is used to explore its potential capability towards early detection of this disease. Image analysis applied to RGB leaf disc images is used to estimate downy mildew (Plamopara viticola) severity in grapevine (Vitis vinifera L. cv Tempranillo). A determination coefficient (R2) of 0.76 ** and a root mean square error (RMSE) of 20.53% are observed in the correlation between downy mildew severity by computer vision and expert’s visual assessment. Furthermore, an accuracy of 81% is achieved to detect downy mildew early using hyperspectral images. These results indicate that non-invasive sensing technologies and computer vision can be applied for assessing and quantify sporulation of downy mildew in grapevine leaves. The severity of this key disease is evaluated in grapevine under laboratory conditions. In conclusion, computer vision, hyperspectral imaging and machine learning could be applied for important disease detection in grapevine. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advances in Viticulture Production)
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Review

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Review
A Sustainable Viticulture Method Adapted to the Cold Climate Zone in China
Horticulturae 2021, 7(6), 150; https://doi.org/10.3390/horticulturae7060150 - 11 Jun 2021
Viewed by 284
Abstract
Due to the particularity of the continental monsoon climate in China, more than 90% of the wine grape cultivation areas require vines to be buried in winter for a burial period that can extend to half a year. Additionally, traditional vine cultivation practices [...] Read more.
Due to the particularity of the continental monsoon climate in China, more than 90% of the wine grape cultivation areas require vines to be buried in winter for a burial period that can extend to half a year. Additionally, traditional vine cultivation practices can expose the surface of the soil during winter, easily leading to soil erosion. To meet the restrictive factors for viticulture in the Chinese cold climate zone, a new sustainable viticulture strategy called crawled cordon mode (CCM) has been developed. CCM includes crawled cordon training (CCT), physical methods of flower and fruit thinning, winter suspension of shoots, the use of a biodegradable liquid film, and covering of grass and branches for simplified management of vineyards. This article summarizes the specific implementation methods of the main measures of CCM and their significant effects on the quality of grapes and wine, ecological environment, and costs, and aims to provide inspiration for the study of sustainable and eco-friendly cultivation measures for vineyards in other cold climate zones. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advances in Viticulture Production)
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