Special Issue "Plant Growth Regulators for Improving the Yield and Quality of Horticultural Crops"

A special issue of Horticulturae (ISSN 2311-7524). This special issue belongs to the section "Developmental Physiology, Biochemistry, and Molecular Biology".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (31 January 2020).

Special Issue Editors

Prof. Dr. Antonio Ferrante
Website SciProfiles
Guest Editor
Department of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences, University of Milano, via Celoria 2, 20133 Milano, Italy
Interests: horticulture; metabolomics; crop physiology of vegetables and floriculture
Special Issues and Collections in MDPI journals
Dr. Giacomo Cocetta
Website
Guest Editor
Department of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences, University of Milano, via Celoria 2, 20133 Milano, Italy
Interests: chlorophyll a fluorescence; crop physiology; fruit quality; plant hormones; postharvest; senescence; vegetables quality
Dr. Igor Pacheco Cruz
Website
Guest Editor
INTA, Universidad de Chile, Avenida El Lı́bano, 5524 Macul, Santiago, Chile
Interests: fruit quality; phenolic compound content; quantitative genetics; genomics; breeding

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

The economic value of horticultural productions is strongly affected by the yield and quality attributes. The quality of horticultural crops is related to several aspects, such as, external appearance, nutritional value, presence of health-related compounds, and safety.

Plant growth regulators (PGRs) are plant hormones or compounds with hormone-like activities, and are either naturally occurring or synthetic compounds. PGRs are active at very low concentrations and interfere with plant hormones’ equilibrium. They include auxins, gibberellins, cytokinins, abscisic acid, ethylene, brassinosteroids, and jasmonates. The use of various classes of PGRs has become common practice in horticulture during cultivation, as well as during the postharvest management of produce. Their application can lead to a higher yield, lower susceptibility or increased tolerance against the biotic and abiotic stresses, enhancing of nutraceutical properties, and a uniformity of ripening or development.

A better understanding of the mechanisms of action and physiological events triggered by PGR applications is crucial for crop management and quality preservation. The understanding of the mode of action of new and older PGRs is still an important research issue that needs to be investigated, using innovative analytical, physiological, biochemical, and molecular biology approaches.

The Special Issue aims to collect research papers and reviews focusing on the mode of action of PGRs and on their effectiveness in improving the yield and quality of produce, both during cultivation and in postharvest. Therefore, research articles, reviews, short notes, and opinion articles related to PGR studies and applications to horticultural crops are welcome for this Special Issue.

Prof. Dr. Antonio Ferrante
Dr. Giacomo Cocetta
Dr. Igor Pacheco Cruz
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Horticulturae is an international peer-reviewed open access quarterly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1000 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Published Papers (3 papers)

Order results
Result details
Select all
Export citation of selected articles as:

Research

Jump to: Review

Open AccessArticle
Influence of Preharvest Gibberellic Acid Treatments on Postharvest Quality of Minimally Processed Leaf Lettuce and Rocket
Horticulturae 2019, 5(3), 63; https://doi.org/10.3390/horticulturae5030063 - 02 Sep 2019
Cited by 5
Abstract
Plant growth regulators are used in high-value vegetable crops during cultivation and after harvest to increase yield, enhance crop management, and improve or retain the produce quality. The aim of this work was to evaluate the quality characteristics during cold storage of minimally [...] Read more.
Plant growth regulators are used in high-value vegetable crops during cultivation and after harvest to increase yield, enhance crop management, and improve or retain the produce quality. The aim of this work was to evaluate the quality characteristics during cold storage of minimally processed leaf lettuce and rocket, obtained from plants grown in a hydroponic floating system with mineral nutrient solutions (MNS) containing different levels of gibberellic acid (GA3). Plants were grown in greenhouse conditions on nutrient solutions containing 0, 10−8, and 10−6 M GA3. At harvest, lettuce and rocket were immediately processed as fresh-cut vegetables and stored for 21 d at 4 °C. After processing, weight loss, total soluble solids, titratable acidity, ascorbic acid and nitrate content, leaf color characteristics, and overall quality were evaluated. Adding 10−6 M GA3 to the MNS of a floating system significantly increased the yield of leaf lettuce and rocket plants and of minimally-processed leaves. In addition, preharvest GA3 treatments had positive effects on delaying senescence and enhancing shelf-life of minimally processed lettuce and rocket. The slowed senescence of GA3-treated samples maintained an overall quality over the threshold of marketability in both lettuce and rocket for up to 21 d of cold storage. Full article
Show Figures

Figure 1

Open AccessArticle
Applications of Abscisic Acid and Increasing Concentrations of Calcium Affect the Partitioning of Mineral Nutrients between Tomato Leaf and Fruit Tissue
Horticulturae 2019, 5(3), 49; https://doi.org/10.3390/horticulturae5030049 - 09 Jul 2019
Cited by 1
Abstract
This study examined how abscisic acid (ABA) and calcium (Ca) concentrations in nutrient solution affect concentrations of mineral nutrients in tomato leaves and fruit. Tomato plants were grown in a greenhouse at 25/20 °C (day/night) under a 16 h photoperiod. Plants were treated [...] Read more.
This study examined how abscisic acid (ABA) and calcium (Ca) concentrations in nutrient solution affect concentrations of mineral nutrients in tomato leaves and fruit. Tomato plants were grown in a greenhouse at 25/20 °C (day/night) under a 16 h photoperiod. Plants were treated with different concentrations of ABA and Ca. Calcium was applied via the irrigation lines at 60, 90, or 180 mg·L−1. ABA was applied as a combination of foliar sprays and root applications. For foliar ABA applications, treatments consisted of deionized (DI) water control (0.0 mg·L−1 ABA) or 500 mg·L−1 ABA. For ABA root applications, treatments consisted of no ABA control (0.0 mg·L−1 ABA) or 50 mg·L−1 ABA applied via the irrigation lines. Results indicate that mineral nutrient concentrations in tomato leaf and fruit tissue varied in connection with each exogenous application of ABA. Variability in mineral nutrient concentration depended on if ABA was applied to the leaf or root tissue. Additionally, increasing Ca treatment concentrations either decreased or did not change mineral nutrients in tomato and fruit tissue. Thus, tomato plants react to acquiring mineral nutrients in numerous mechanisms and, depending on how the applications of exogenous ABA are applied, can have varying effects on these mechanisms. Full article

Review

Jump to: Research

Open AccessReview
Recent Advances in Hormonal Regulation and Cross-Talk during Non-Climacteric Fruit Development and Ripening
Horticulturae 2019, 5(2), 45; https://doi.org/10.3390/horticulturae5020045 - 03 Jun 2019
Cited by 7
Abstract
Fleshy fruits are characterized by having a developmentally and genetically controlled, highly intricate ripening process, leading to dramatic modifications in fruit size, texture, color, flavor, and aroma. Climacteric fruits such as tomato, pear, banana, and melon show a ripening-associated increase in respiration and [...] Read more.
Fleshy fruits are characterized by having a developmentally and genetically controlled, highly intricate ripening process, leading to dramatic modifications in fruit size, texture, color, flavor, and aroma. Climacteric fruits such as tomato, pear, banana, and melon show a ripening-associated increase in respiration and ethylene production and these processes are well-documented. In contrast, the hormonal mechanism of fruit development and ripening in non-climacteric fruit, such as strawberry, grape, raspberry, and citrus, is not well characterized. However, recent studies have shown that non-climacteric fruit development and ripening, involves the coordinated action of different hormones, such as abscisic acid (ABA), auxin, gibberellins, ethylene, and others. In this review, we discuss and evaluate the recent research findings concerning the hormonal regulation of non-climacteric fruit development and ripening and their cross-talk by taking grape, strawberry, and raspberry as reference fruit species. Full article
Show Figures

Figure 1

Back to TopTop