Microbes and Plant Stress Tolerance

A special issue of Horticulturae (ISSN 2311-7524). This special issue belongs to the section "Biotic and Abiotic Stress".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (15 April 2024) | Viewed by 3080

Special Issue Editors


E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
College of Life Sciences, Anhui Normal University, Beijingdong Road, Wuhu 241000, China
Interests: plant physiological ecology; plant-microbe interactions
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
College of Horticulture and Gardening, Yangtze University, Jingzhou 434025, China
Interests: stress tolerance; tea; root system architecture; root hairs

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

In the process of plant growth and development, horticultural plants encounter various biotic and abiotic stresses, which seriously inhibit the growth and yield of horticultural plants, even plant death. Therefore, increasing the stress resistance of horticultural plants is an urgent task. At the same time, several microbes are closely associated with plants, such as arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi and root-associated endophytic fungi. They play an important role in enhancing plant stress resistance. These microbes enhance the physiological activities and molecular response mechanisms of plants through various ways to enhance plant resistance. Therefore, the dialogue between plants and microbes under stress conditions has become important research, and deciphering such functions of microbes has become a trend.

This Special Issue “Microbes and Plant Stress Tolerance” aims to present the role of important microbes in plant stress tolerance and their applications. Any association of beneficial and harmful microbes in the role of plants (such as fruit plants, vegetable plants, ornamental plants, tea plants, medicinal plants, etc.) in stressed environments is welcome.

Prof. Dr. Qiang-Sheng Wu
Dr. Xiancan Zhu
Dr. Chunyan Liu
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Horticulturae is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2200 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Published Papers (2 papers)

Order results
Result details
Select all
Export citation of selected articles as:

Research

24 pages, 1443 KiB  
Article
Microbial Consortia Versus Single-Strain Inoculants as Drought Stress Protectants in Potato Affected by the Form of N Supply
by Abdullah Al Mamun, Günter Neumann, Narges Moradtalab, Aneesh Ahmed, Brice Dupuis, Geoffrey Darbon, Fahim Nawaz, Stephane Declerck, Karin Mai, Wolfgang Vogt, Uwe Ludewig and Markus Weinmann
Horticulturae 2024, 10(1), 102; https://doi.org/10.3390/horticulturae10010102 - 20 Jan 2024
Viewed by 1451
Abstract
This study investigated the drought protection effects of six fungal and bacterial inoculants and ten consortia thereof on vegetative growth, nutritional status, and tuberization of potato under controlled and field conditions. It was hypothesized that microbial consortia offer improved drought protection as compared [...] Read more.
This study investigated the drought protection effects of six fungal and bacterial inoculants and ten consortia thereof on vegetative growth, nutritional status, and tuberization of potato under controlled and field conditions. It was hypothesized that microbial consortia offer improved drought protection as compared with single strains, due to complementary or synergistic effects, with differential impacts also of N fertilization management. Under NO3 fertilization, a 70% reduction in water supply over six weeks reduced shoot and tuber biomass of non-inoculated plants by 30% and 50%, respectively, and induced phosphate (P) limitation compared to the well-watered control. The P nutritional status was significantly increased above the deficiency threshold by three single-strain inoculants and eight consortia. This was associated with the presence of the arbuscular mycorrhizal fungus (AMF) inoculant Rhizophagus irregularis MUCL41833 (five cases) and stimulation of root growth (five cases). Additionally, Bacillus amyloliquefaciens FZB42 and AMF + Pseudomonas brassicacearum 3Re2-7 significantly reduced irreversible drought-induced leaf damage after recovery to well-watered conditions. However, the microbial inoculants did not mitigate drought-induced reductions in tuber biomass, neither in greenhouse nor in field experiments. By contrast, NH4+-dominated fertilization significantly increased tuber biomass under drought stress (534%), which was further increased by additional AMF inoculation (951%). This coincided with (i) improved enzymatic detoxification of drought-induced reactive oxygen species (ROS), (ii) improved osmotic adjustment in the shoot tissue (glycine betaine accumulation), (iii) increased shoot concentrations of ABA, jasmonic acid, and indole acetic acid, involved in drought stress signaling and tuberization, and (iv) reduced irreversible drought-induced leaf damage. Additional application of bacterial inoculants further improved ROS detoxification by increasing the production of antioxidants but stimulated biomass allocation towards shoot growth at the expense of tuber development. The results demonstrated that microbial consortia could increase the probability of drought protection effects influenced by the form of N supply. However, protective effects on vegetative growth do not necessarily translate into yield benefits, which can be achieved by adequate combination of inoculants and fertilizers. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Microbes and Plant Stress Tolerance)
Show Figures

Figure 1

13 pages, 2927 KiB  
Article
Positive Changes in Fruit Quality, Leaf Antioxidant Defense System, and Soil Fertility of Beni-Madonna Tangor Citrus (Citrus nanko × C. amakusa) after Field AMF Inoculation
by Li-Jun Zhou, Yu Wang, Mashael Daghash Alqahtani and Qiang-Sheng Wu
Horticulturae 2023, 9(12), 1324; https://doi.org/10.3390/horticulturae9121324 - 09 Dec 2023
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 806
Abstract
Citrus plants rely heavily on arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF) due to their lack of root hairs. Most experiments have been conducted with AMF inoculation under potted conditions, while field inoculation of AMF on citrus, especially a high economic hybrid tangor variety Beni-Madonna ( [...] Read more.
Citrus plants rely heavily on arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF) due to their lack of root hairs. Most experiments have been conducted with AMF inoculation under potted conditions, while field inoculation of AMF on citrus, especially a high economic hybrid tangor variety Beni-Madonna (Citrus nanko × C. amakusa), has been rarely recorded. This study aimed to analyze the effects of two AMF inoculations (a single Funneliformis mosseae and a mixture of F. mosseae, Diversispora versiformis, and Rhizophagus intraradices) on the internal and external fruit quality, leaf antioxidant defense system, and soil fertility and structure of top-worked Beni-Madonna tangor citrus trees. Three and a half years after AMF inoculations, soil hyphal length and root mycorrhizal colonization rate increased by 61.2–101.8% and 15.85–29.6% in inoculated plants, respectively. Inoculated trees had higher external fruit coloration value, fruit horizontal diameter, and fruit weight, and lower fruit rigidity than uninoculated trees. AMF-inoculated trees had higher glucose levels of fruit peels, fructose and sucrose levels of fruit fleshes, and the ratio of fruit soluble solids/titratable acids, as well as lower titratable acids concentrations than non-AMF-inoculated trees. AMF inoculation significantly increased leaf nitrogen balance index, chlorophyll index, peroxidase, catalase, superoxide dismutase, and glutathione reductase activities, as well as reduced glutathione and oxidized glutathione concentrations, resulting in lower hydrogen peroxide and malondialdehyde levels when compared to the uninoculated treatment. In addition, inoculated trees presented higher soil nutrient levels, including organic carbon, available K, and Olsen-P as, well as soil aggregate stability (based on mean weight diameter) than uninoculated trees. This study concluded that field AMF inoculation improved fruit quality, enhanced leaf antioxidant defense system, and improved soil fertility of Beni-Madonna trees, with mixed AMF being prominent in improving fruit quality and F. mosseae being prominent in enhancing leaf antioxidant defense system and improving soil fertility. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Microbes and Plant Stress Tolerance)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Back to TopTop