Current Nursing Practice and Education

A topical collection in Healthcare (ISSN 2227-9032). This collection belongs to the section "Nursing".

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Health Promotion, University of the Sunshine Coast, 90 Sippy Downs Dr, Sippy Downs, QLD 4556, Australia
Interests: health communication; health promotion and education; mental health promotion; injury surveillance and control; educational research
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Topical Collection Information

Dear Colleagues,

This topic collection is a curated selection of articles that provide a comprehensive overview of the current developments, trends, and challenges in nursing practice and education.

It covers a range of topics, such as evidence-based practice, patient safety and quality, health promotion and prevention, chronic disease management, palliative and end-of-life care, cultural competence and diversity, interprofessional collaboration, professional development and life-long learning, innovation and technology, leadership, ethics, and more.

This topic collection is intended for researchers, educators, practitioners, students, and policy makers who are interested in advancing nursing practice and education. We aim to foster collaboration and the exchange of ideas among the practice, education, and scholarly communities across different settings, levels, and specialties.

This topic collection is free to access and use by all.

Dr. Florin Oprescu
Collection Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the collection website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Healthcare is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2700 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Published Papers (20 papers)

2024

Jump to: 2023

11 pages, 587 KiB  
Article
Effects of Self-Leadership on Nursing Professionalism among Nursing Students: The Mediating Effects of Positive Psychological Capital and Consciousness of Calling
by Jiyoung Seo and Hana Ko
Healthcare 2024, 12(12), 1200; https://doi.org/10.3390/healthcare12121200 - 15 Jun 2024
Viewed by 307
Abstract
To provide high-quality nursing care, nursing education requires the basic quality of self-leadership from professional nurses so that they can make self-directed and responsible judgments and decisions. Therefore, this study aimed to investigate relationships among self-leadership, positive psychological capital, consciousness of calling, and [...] Read more.
To provide high-quality nursing care, nursing education requires the basic quality of self-leadership from professional nurses so that they can make self-directed and responsible judgments and decisions. Therefore, this study aimed to investigate relationships among self-leadership, positive psychological capital, consciousness of calling, and nursing professionalism in nursing students. A cross-sectional online survey of 202 students from two universities in South Korea was conducted between August and September 2022, using a convenience sampling method. A structured questionnaire was used to collect data. Data were analyzed using descriptive statistics, Pearson’s correlation coefficient analysis, and bootstrapping using Hayes’ PROCESS macro for mediation. A significant positive correlation was found between self-leadership, positive psychological capital, consciousness of calling, and nursing professionalism. Positive psychological capital and consciousness of calling showed an indirect mediating effect on the relationship between self-leadership and nursing professionalism. To improve nursing professionalism, programs should be developed to educate nursing students, strengthen their self-leadership skills, and increase the influence of positive psychological capital and consciousness of calling for nursing. This will ultimately contribute to improving the quality of patient care by fostering competent nursing experts. Full article
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24 pages, 587 KiB  
Review
Assessing the Competence of Nursing Students in Clinical Practice: The Clinical Preceptors’ Perspective
by Watin Arif Alkhelaiwi, Marian Traynor, Katherine Rogers and Iseult Wilson
Healthcare 2024, 12(10), 1031; https://doi.org/10.3390/healthcare12101031 - 16 May 2024
Viewed by 938
Abstract
Nursing students’ integration of theoretical knowledge and practical abilities is facilitated by their practice of nursing skills in a clinical environment. A key role of preceptors is to assess the learning goals that nursing students must meet while participating in clinical practice. Consequently, [...] Read more.
Nursing students’ integration of theoretical knowledge and practical abilities is facilitated by their practice of nursing skills in a clinical environment. A key role of preceptors is to assess the learning goals that nursing students must meet while participating in clinical practice. Consequently, the purpose of this study was to explore the current evidence in relation to competency assessment and assessment approaches, and the willingness of preceptors for assessing nursing students’ competency in a clinical setting. The scoping review used the five-stage methodological framework that was developed by Arksey and O’Malley, as well as the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses Extension for Scoping Reviews. Relevant studies were searched by applying a comprehensive literature search strategy up to April 2024 across the following databases: CINAHL, OVID MEDLINE, EMBASE, and PUBMED. A total of 11,297 studies published between 2000 and April 2024 were revealed, and 38 were eligible for inclusion, which the research team categorised into three main themes: definitions of competence, tools for assessing competence and preceptors’ and mentors’ viewpoints in relation to the assessment of nursing students’ competence. This review established that there are a multitude of quantitative instruments available to assess clinical competence; however, a lack of consistency among assessment instruments and approaches between countries and higher education institutions is prevalent. Existing research evidence suggests that the preceptors carried out the assessment process clinically and they found difficulties in documenting assessment. The assessing of nursing students’ competency and the complexity of assessment is a concern for educators and mentors worldwide. The main concern centers around issues such as the interpretation of competence and complex measurement tools. Full article
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12 pages, 1030 KiB  
Article
Nurses’ Attitudes and Perceptions Regarding Suicidal Patients: A Quasi-Experimental Study of Depression Management Training
by Yael Sela and Yossi Levi-Belz
Healthcare 2024, 12(3), 284; https://doi.org/10.3390/healthcare12030284 - 23 Jan 2024
Viewed by 1005
Abstract
Suicide prevention is a priority globally. Community nurses are on the frontline of healthcare, and thus well placed to identify those at risk of suicide and act to prevent it. However, they are often ill-equipped to do so. This study examines whether depression [...] Read more.
Suicide prevention is a priority globally. Community nurses are on the frontline of healthcare, and thus well placed to identify those at risk of suicide and act to prevent it. However, they are often ill-equipped to do so. This study examines whether depression management training for nurses may also help them manage suicide-risk patients. Method: This quasi-experimental study used a questionnaire that included a randomly assigned textual case vignette, measures related to patient descriptions portrayed in the vignette, and demographic and clinical/training information. The participants were 139 Israeli nurses who were mostly Jewish, Israeli-born, and married women working as community nurses. Almost half had completed depression management training (DMT) in their routine work. Results: Nurses who completed depression management training were more likely than non-trainees to query the patient regarding mental status and suicide plans and were more likely to refer them to appropriate further treatment. The graduate nurses also reported higher self-competence and more positive attitudes regarding their ability to assess depression and suicide risk than nurses who had not received depression management training. Discussion: The results highlight the importance of depression management training, as suicide assessment and referral are among the major steps to suicide prevention. Full article
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12 pages, 804 KiB  
Article
Dermatology Self-Medication in Nursing Students and Professionals: A Multicentre Study
by Ana Batalla, Alba-Elena Martínez-Santos, Sara Braña Balige, Sara Varela Fontán, Lucía Vilanova-Trillo, Paz Diéguez and Ángeles Flórez
Healthcare 2024, 12(2), 258; https://doi.org/10.3390/healthcare12020258 - 19 Jan 2024
Viewed by 925
Abstract
Current evidence shows that the prevalence of self-medication in healthcare professionals and their students is troublingly high despite them knowing the risks involved. There is limited research on self-medication in dermatology, and there are even fewer studies on this practice among nurses and [...] Read more.
Current evidence shows that the prevalence of self-medication in healthcare professionals and their students is troublingly high despite them knowing the risks involved. There is limited research on self-medication in dermatology, and there are even fewer studies on this practice among nurses and nursing students, despite the potential mucocutaneous health problems that may affect them. The aims of our study were to examine the prevalence of self-medication mainly in the field of dermatology among nurses and nursing students as well as to explore if age or years of professional/academic practice influenced such behaviour. This multicentre cross-sectional study was conducted in 2021. In total, 120 nurses from the University Hospital of Pontevedra and 303 nursing students from the Universities of Vigo and Santiago de Compostela (N-W Spain) participated in this study (n = 423). An ad hoc questionnaire was used to evaluate self-medication decision-making. Self-medication for dermatological diseases was reported by 58.39% (n = 247) of participants. Among our respondents, 44.44% of nurses and 42.68% of students would recommend treatment for skin diseases to a third party. We found a higher prevalence of medication without prescription in nurses than in students (p < 0.001). More experience (p = 0.01) and older age (p < 0.001) were associated with more self-medication in the case of nurses and students, respectively. The prevalence of self-medication and treatment recommendation to a third party are cause for concern. Identifying these situations and associated factors may help to implement evidence-based strategies and education. Full article
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2023

Jump to: 2024

11 pages, 649 KiB  
Review
Teaching Strategies for Developing Clinical Reasoning Skills in Nursing Students: A Systematic Review of Randomised Controlled Trials
by Ana Pérez-Perdomo and Adelaida Zabalegui
Healthcare 2024, 12(1), 90; https://doi.org/10.3390/healthcare12010090 - 30 Dec 2023
Viewed by 2026
Abstract
Background: Clinical reasoning (CR) is a holistic and recursive cognitive process. It allows nursing students to accurately perceive patients’ situations and choose the best course of action among the available alternatives. This study aimed to identify the randomised controlled trials studies in the [...] Read more.
Background: Clinical reasoning (CR) is a holistic and recursive cognitive process. It allows nursing students to accurately perceive patients’ situations and choose the best course of action among the available alternatives. This study aimed to identify the randomised controlled trials studies in the literature that concern clinical reasoning in the context of nursing students. Methods: A comprehensive search of PubMed, Scopus, Embase, and the Cochrane Controlled Register of Trials (CENTRAL) was performed to identify relevant studies published up to October 2023. The following inclusion criteria were examined: (a) clinical reasoning, clinical judgment, and critical thinking in nursing students as a primary study aim; (b) articles published for the last eleven years; (c) research conducted between January 2012 and September 2023; (d) articles published only in English and Spanish; and (e) Randomised Clinical Trials. The Critical Appraisal Skills Programme tool was utilised to appraise all included studies. Results: Fifteen papers were analysed. Based on the teaching strategies used in the articles, two groups have been identified: simulation methods and learning programs. The studies focus on comparing different teaching methodologies. Conclusions: This systematic review has detected different approaches to help nursing students improve their reasoning and decision-making skills. The use of mobile apps, digital simulations, and learning games has a positive impact on the clinical reasoning abilities of nursing students and their motivation. Incorporating new technologies into problem-solving-based learning and decision-making can also enhance nursing students’ reasoning skills. Nursing schools should evaluate their current methods and consider integrating or modifying new technologies and methodologies that can help enhance students’ learning and improve their clinical reasoning and cognitive skills. Full article
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14 pages, 764 KiB  
Article
The Role of Knowledge on Nursing Students’ Attitudes toward Organ Donation: A Cross-Sectional Study
by Mai B. Alwesmi, Amirah Ibrahim Alharbi, Amjad Abdullah Alsaiari, Asalah Emad Abu Alreesh, Bashair Abdullah Alasmari, May Awad Alanazi, May Khalil Alanizi, Nouf Mohammed Alsaif, Razan Mohammed Alanazi, Sheikhah Abdullah Alshdayed and Yasmine Alabbasi
Healthcare 2023, 11(24), 3134; https://doi.org/10.3390/healthcare11243134 - 9 Dec 2023
Viewed by 1230
Abstract
Background: Nursing students constitute the future nursing workforce; their knowledge can readily influence potential donors’ decisions on organ donation. This study aimed to assess nursing students’ knowledge of organ donation, determine its impact on their attitude, and identify relevant factors. Methods: A cross-sectional [...] Read more.
Background: Nursing students constitute the future nursing workforce; their knowledge can readily influence potential donors’ decisions on organ donation. This study aimed to assess nursing students’ knowledge of organ donation, determine its impact on their attitude, and identify relevant factors. Methods: A cross-sectional comparative study assessed the level of knowledge and attitude toward organ donation among nursing students using the following two questionnaires: (1) knowledge about organ donation and (2) attitudes toward posthumous organ donation. Non-probability convenience sampling was employed to collect data. Results: A total of 278 nursing students demonstrated a low level of knowledge on organ donation, with a score of 6.43 out of 15. This influenced their attitude toward organ donation (χ2 (3) = 33.91, p < 0.001). Nursing students who were willing to donate their organs showed higher knowledge (7.33 ± 3.23) compared to those who were not willing to donate their organs (5.21 ± 3.09), p < 0.001. Registered donors had higher knowledge (8.52 ± 2.99) than non-donors (5.80 ± 3.17), p < 0.001. Conclusions: Even though nursing students typically favor organ donation, findings have revealed a low knowledge score. Therefore, it is necessary to improve knowledge of organ donation through nursing curricula and research, which could potentially increase the number of donors among future nursing students and, by extension, the broader population. Full article
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14 pages, 289 KiB  
Article
“Learning a Way of Thinking”—World Café on Clinical Reasoning in Nursing and Midwifery Education and Practice across Five European Union Countries
by Ljubiša Pađen, Manca Pajnič, Renata Vettorazzi, Ana Pérez-Perdomo, Małgorzata Stefaniak, Nele Claes, Hugo Franco, An Vandervoort and Mirjam Ravljen
Healthcare 2023, 11(22), 2969; https://doi.org/10.3390/healthcare11222969 - 16 Nov 2023
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 1186
Abstract
Clinical reasoning is a key attribute of nursing and midwifery professionals. As a part of the Erasmus plus project, we designed a study with the aim of exploring the understanding of clinical reasoning as a concept, experiences of teaching clinical reasoning and practices [...] Read more.
Clinical reasoning is a key attribute of nursing and midwifery professionals. As a part of the Erasmus plus project, we designed a study with the aim of exploring the understanding of clinical reasoning as a concept, experiences of teaching clinical reasoning and practices related to using clinical reasoning in nursing and midwifery. A qualitative study was carried out using the World Café method, involving 44 participants from five European countries. The participants represented diverse professional backgrounds, including nurses, midwives and lecturers. Our analytical approach was based on a thematic analysis. We categorized the data into three main categories, namely, “Spiral of thinking”, “The learning and teaching of a way of thinking” and “Clinical reasoning in real life”, all under an overarching theme, “Learning a way of thinking”. This study highlighted areas of learning and teaching which can be improved in current nursing and midwifery education. Furthermore, it identified barriers, facilitators and practices from five European countries which can be used in the further development of nursing and midwifery curricula and courses with the aim of enhancing clinical reasoning competence and ultimately improving patient care. Full article
21 pages, 930 KiB  
Review
“What Do We Know about Hope in Nursing Care?”: A Synthesis of Concept Analysis Studies
by Mónica Antunes, Carlos Laranjeira, Ana Querido and Zaida Charepe
Healthcare 2023, 11(20), 2739; https://doi.org/10.3390/healthcare11202739 - 14 Oct 2023
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 2034
Abstract
Hope is a central concept within the nursing literature, which is crucial towards the development of nursing knowledge. Nursing teams play a crucial role in exploring the meaning of hope and promoting hope among patients and their families. This study aims to synthesize [...] Read more.
Hope is a central concept within the nursing literature, which is crucial towards the development of nursing knowledge. Nursing teams play a crucial role in exploring the meaning of hope and promoting hope among patients and their families. This study aims to synthesize concept analysis studies of hope in the context of nursing care and to propose an evidence-based update of the definition of hope in the International Classification for Nursing Practice (ICNP®). Method: This is a literature review, involving the synthesis of studies concerning the concept analysis of hope in nursing practice. Peer-reviewed articles with fully accessible Portuguese or English text were considered. As we aimed to include a historical perspective of the concept, no restriction upon the time of publication was set. Articles were selected in March 2022 and updated in July 2023 using the Medline, CINAHL, and Scopus databases. The search terms used were “hope” AND “concept” AND “analysis” AND “nurs*”. Only articles written in English or Portuguese were included. Two reviewers conducted the research synthesis and report independently to minimize the risk of bias in the included studies. This paper adheres to the PRISMA checklist. To clarify the concept of hope as perceived by patients and develop hope as an evidence-based nursing concept, 13 studies were reviewed. The concept of hope, its attributes, antecedents, and consequences, as well as similar concepts, were studied by nurses and synthesized into a definition. The identified antecedents include pivotal life events, stressful stimuli, and experiencing satisfaction with life. The analysis of its attributes, antecedents, and consequences has contributed to understanding its relevance in nursing care and provided a proposed update of hope in the ICNP®. This review provides conceptual clarity on how hope is defined and used in nursing practice and the potential factors that may impact the promotion of hope to provide opportunities for future nursing research. Full article
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12 pages, 553 KiB  
Article
Alternative Clinical Practice Experiences of Korean Nursing Students during the COVID-19 Pandemic
by Eun-Ho Ha
Healthcare 2023, 11(17), 2452; https://doi.org/10.3390/healthcare11172452 - 1 Sep 2023
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 891
Abstract
Background: Routine clinical practice (RCP) experiences provide nursing students with the opportunity to gain confidence in their professional roles. The purpose of this study was to explore the alternative clinical practice (ACP) experiences of nursing students during the COVID-19 pandemic using the Q [...] Read more.
Background: Routine clinical practice (RCP) experiences provide nursing students with the opportunity to gain confidence in their professional roles. The purpose of this study was to explore the alternative clinical practice (ACP) experiences of nursing students during the COVID-19 pandemic using the Q methodology. Methods: Fifty-two nursing students located in four cities across South Korea participated. The participants sorted the order of and ranked 41 Q statements about their experiences with ACP into a Q sort table; the data were analyzed using the PQ method. Results: The following three distinct viewpoints were extracted: (1) ACP helps with balancing learning and life (favorable view of ACP); (2) ACP does not help with balancing theory and clinical field practice (critical view of ACP); and (3) RCP cannot be replaced by ACP (negative view of ACP). Conclusions: The findings of this study indicate that developing a curriculum for clinical practice that can enhance the strengths of ACP while compensating for its weaknesses will help promote learning among nursing students. Full article
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11 pages, 870 KiB  
Article
A Pilot Study to Examine the Effects of a Workplace Cyberbullying Cognitive Rehearsal Mobile Learning Program for Head Nurses: A Quasi-Experimental Study
by Mijeong Park, Ok Yeon Cho and Jeong Sil Choi
Healthcare 2023, 11(14), 2041; https://doi.org/10.3390/healthcare11142041 - 17 Jul 2023
Viewed by 1209
Abstract
This study aimed to (1) develop a version of the cognitive rehearsal program that is suitable for cyberbullying and (2) apply the m-learning method to evaluate its effectiveness among head nurses. This study was conducted in July 2021 and comprised 69 South Korean [...] Read more.
This study aimed to (1) develop a version of the cognitive rehearsal program that is suitable for cyberbullying and (2) apply the m-learning method to evaluate its effectiveness among head nurses. This study was conducted in July 2021 and comprised 69 South Korean university hospital head nurses. It was evaluated using a nonequivalent control group pretest-posttest and a quasi-experimental design. The program was developed using the Analysis, Design, Development, Implementation, and Evaluation (ADDIE) step process, consisting of 10 scenarios. Variables with proven reliability were used in the program effect measurement. The differences between the experimental and control groups were examined using an independent t-test (perception) or the Mann–Whitney U test (symptom experience, knowledge, and turnover intention). The program positively affected and improved head nurses’ knowledge and perception of workplace cyberbullying; however, it elevated their symptom experience and had no immediate impact on turnover intention. The developed program could be applied as a valuable educational strategy in the nursing field. Head nurses act as intermediaries between individuals and the organization. Therefore, they must respond with in-depth knowledge and perceptions of cyberbullying to fulfill their responsibilities of identifying, mediating, and managing cyberbullying among hospital team members. Full article
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18 pages, 927 KiB  
Article
Introducing Computerized Technology to Nurses: A Model Based on Cognitive Instrumental and Social Influence Processes
by Becky Tsarfati and Daniela Cojocaru
Healthcare 2023, 11(12), 1788; https://doi.org/10.3390/healthcare11121788 - 17 Jun 2023
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 2253
Abstract
The use of computerized technologies as an integral part of nursing has become a reality in the health care system. Studies present different approaches that range from accepting technology as a health promoter to an approach that opposes computerization. This study, which examined [...] Read more.
The use of computerized technologies as an integral part of nursing has become a reality in the health care system. Studies present different approaches that range from accepting technology as a health promoter to an approach that opposes computerization. This study, which examined social and instrumental processes that influence nurses’ attitudes toward computer technology, will present a model for the optimal assimilation of computer technology in the nurses’ work environment. The study, which included 224 participants, was designed as a mixed method and included questionnaires and semi-structured interviews of participants. The data were analyzed to understand the factors that influenced nurses’ attitudes toward the use of computer technology. The research findings show that the more clearly nurses understand the positive impact of using technology on the quality of care, the more positive their response to changes in registration and reporting methods. It is not surprising that the research findings found that cognitive instrumental processes and social influence processes have a positive effect on the perceived usefulness of using computer technologies. The unusual finding was the fact that cognitive instrumental processes were the main factor influencing the assimilation of computer technology even though nursing is a social profession. Full article
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13 pages, 283 KiB  
Article
Nurses’ Perceptions of Patient Fibromyalgia Illness Experiences after Performing Group-Based Problem-Solving Therapy: A Qualitative Research Study
by Pilar Montesó-Curto, Maria Luisa Panisello-Chavarria, Lidia Sarrió-Colás and Loren Toussaint
Healthcare 2023, 11(11), 1531; https://doi.org/10.3390/healthcare11111531 - 24 May 2023
Viewed by 1193
Abstract
Fibromyalgia patients experience difficulties in their daily lives that are difficult to identify and recognize due to the stigma associated with the disease. Nurses can help identify them to establish biopsychosocial coping and treatment. The main aim of this study was to explore [...] Read more.
Fibromyalgia patients experience difficulties in their daily lives that are difficult to identify and recognize due to the stigma associated with the disease. Nurses can help identify them to establish biopsychosocial coping and treatment. The main aim of this study was to explore Spanish nurses’ perceptions of the illness experiences of their fibromyalgia patients. Qualitative content analysis from the etic perspective was used. Eight nurses met in focus groups to report their perceptions of the illness experiences of FM patients after led group-based problem-solving therapy in fibromyalgia patients. Four themes emerged: (1) the presence of a “specific trigger” (stressful event) for FM symptoms; (2) fulfilling expected gender roles; (3) a lack of support from the family; (4) abuse. Nurses recognize the mind–body connection after the impact of stress on patients’ bodies. The expected gender roles interfere with patients’ recovery because they feel frustration and guilt about not being able to fulfil them. Managing emotions and improving communication in fibromyalgia is recommended. Clinicians might also consider issues such as abuse and the absence of social–family support for the comprehensive evaluation and effective management of fibromyalgia. Full article
12 pages, 241 KiB  
Article
Distance Learning in Nursing Education during the COVID-19 Pandemic: Psychosocial Impact for the Greek Nursing Students—A Qualitative Approach
by Evangelia Kartsoni, Nikolaos Bakalis, George Markakis, Michail Zografakis-Sfakianakis, Evridiki Patelarou and Athina Patelarou
Healthcare 2023, 11(8), 1178; https://doi.org/10.3390/healthcare11081178 - 19 Apr 2023
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 1614
Abstract
(1) Background: The COVID-19 pandemic posed a major threat to global health and on the educational field. The purpose of this study is to identify and illustrate the psychosocial adaptation of nursing students to the sudden and exclusive application of distance learning during [...] Read more.
(1) Background: The COVID-19 pandemic posed a major threat to global health and on the educational field. The purpose of this study is to identify and illustrate the psychosocial adaptation of nursing students to the sudden and exclusive application of distance learning during the COVID-19 pandemic; (2) Methods: A qualitative interview research has been designed. Two focus groups of seven members each and six individual interviews were conducted in a sample of undergraduate nursing students in Greece from 3 March 2021, to 9 April 2021.; (3) Results: A qualitative thematic analysis of the data identified six themes: 1. Challenges; 2. Concerns; 3. Social changes; 4. Negative Emotions; 5. Evaluation; and 6. Teaching strategies.; (4) Conclusions: During its implementation, it identified gaps and weaknesses in the entire academic community. The study of the psychosocial adaptation of the academic community is considered crucial, as it can highlight the individual difficulties in distance learning and contribute to the improvement of the methods of its the improvement of its methods. Full article
15 pages, 5234 KiB  
Article
Effects of a Technology-Supported Decision, Reflection, and Interaction Approach on Nursing Students’ Learning Achievement and Self-Efficacy in Professional Training: A Pilot Study
by Gwo-Jen Hwang, Hsiu-Ju Jen and Ching-Yi Chang
Healthcare 2023, 11(8), 1164; https://doi.org/10.3390/healthcare11081164 - 18 Apr 2023
Viewed by 1229
Abstract
In professional training, it is important to provide students with opportunities to make judgments on practical cases. However, most training courses are conducted in a one-to-many teaching mode, and it is not easy to consider the needs of individual students. In this study, [...] Read more.
In professional training, it is important to provide students with opportunities to make judgments on practical cases. However, most training courses are conducted in a one-to-many teaching mode, and it is not easy to consider the needs of individual students. In this study, a technology-supported Decision, Reflection, and Interaction (DRI)-based professional training approach is proposed to cope with this problem for those courses aiming at fostering students’ competence in making correct judgments when facing real cases. To verify the effectiveness of the proposed method, an experiment was conducted. Two classes of 38 students from a nursing school were the participants. One class was an experimental group using the DRI-based professional training approach, and the other class was the control group using the conventional technology-assisted training approach. The experimental results showed that applying the proposed approach significantly improved the students’ learning achievement and self-efficacy more than the conventional technology-assisted approach. In addition, based on the interview results, the students generally believed that learning through the DRI-based professional training approach benefited them from several perspectives, including “increasing the value of activities”, “enhancing the planning and expensive capacity of conspicuous approaches”, “promoting decision-making”, “improving learning reflection”, and “providing students with personalized interaction”. Full article
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9 pages, 250 KiB  
Article
Assessing Inhaler Techniques of Asthma Patients Using Aerosol Inhalation Monitors (AIM): A Cross-Sectional Study
by Mansour M. Alotaibi, Louise Hughes and William R. Ford
Healthcare 2023, 11(8), 1125; https://doi.org/10.3390/healthcare11081125 - 13 Apr 2023
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 1917
Abstract
A high percentage of asthma patients have symptoms that are not well controlled, despite effective drugs being available. One potential reason for this may be that poor inhaler technique limits the dose delivered to the lungs, thereby reducing the therapeutic efficacy. The aim [...] Read more.
A high percentage of asthma patients have symptoms that are not well controlled, despite effective drugs being available. One potential reason for this may be that poor inhaler technique limits the dose delivered to the lungs, thereby reducing the therapeutic efficacy. The aim of this study was to assess the prevalence of poor inhaler technique in an asthma patient population and to probe the impact of various demographic parameters on technique quality. This study was conducted at community pharmacies across Wales, UK. Patients diagnosed with asthma and 12 years or older were invited to participate. An aerosol inhalation monitor (AIM, Vitalograph®) was used to measure the quality of patient inhaler technique. A total of 295 AIM assessments were carried out. There were significant differences in the quality of inhaler technique across the different inhaler types (p < 0.001, Chi squared). The best technique was associated with dry-powder inhalers (DPI devices, 58% of 72 having good technique), compared with pressurized metered-dose inhalers (pMDI) or pMDIs with a spacer device (18% of 174 and 47% of 49 AIM assessments, respectively). There were some significant associations between gender, age, and quality of inhaler technique, as determined with adjusted odds ratios. It seems that the majority of asthmatic patients were not using their inhalers appropriately. We recommend that healthcare professionals place more emphasis on assessing and correcting inhaler technique, as poor inhaler technique might be responsible for the observed lack of symptom control in the asthma patient population. Full article
18 pages, 1931 KiB  
Article
Effects of Digital Learning and Virtual Reality in Port-A Catheter Training Course for Oncology Nurses: A Mixed-Methods Study
by Shu-Feng Shih, Li-Ling Hsu and Suh-Ing Hsieh
Healthcare 2023, 11(7), 1017; https://doi.org/10.3390/healthcare11071017 - 3 Apr 2023
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 2156
Abstract
In-service education for oncology nurses usually adopts didactic teaching. This study investigated the effects of virtual reality (VR) and a digital learning-based Port-A-catheter educational course for oncology nurses. A mixed-methods research design was employed, with a convenience sample of 43 nurses from a [...] Read more.
In-service education for oncology nurses usually adopts didactic teaching. This study investigated the effects of virtual reality (VR) and a digital learning-based Port-A-catheter educational course for oncology nurses. A mixed-methods research design was employed, with a convenience sample of 43 nurses from a regional teaching hospital in Taiwan participating. Measurements were taken at three time points: pre-test, 1st post-test, and 2nd post-test. The data was analyzed using descriptive statistics and repeated ANOVA tests. Results showed significant improvement in Port-A-catheter knowledge and skill levels (p < 0.0001) and high learning attitude and satisfaction scores of 4.29 ± 0.46 and 4.31 ± 0.58 points, respectively. Five qualitative themes emerged, highlighting the realistic VR scenarios, VR practice’s usefulness, willingness to learn with VR, VR system limitations, and the potential for future courses. The study concluded that a VR-based educational course effectively enhanced nurses’ knowledge, skills, learning attitude, and satisfaction, recommending the inclusion of diverse clinical scenarios for practical learning. Full article
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11 pages, 227 KiB  
Article
Distress of Educators Teaching Nursing Students with Potential Learning Disabilities: A Qualitative Analysis
by Mari Murakami, Hiromi Kawasaki, Zhengai Cui, Hiroko Kokusho and Masayuki Kakehashi
Healthcare 2023, 11(4), 615; https://doi.org/10.3390/healthcare11040615 - 18 Feb 2023
Viewed by 1588
Abstract
Clinical training at Japanese nursing universities has an increasing need for individualized learning support for students with potential learning disabilities. Despite a high interest in student support, educators’ difficulties are neglected. This study clarified the difficulties encountered by practical training instructors in delivering [...] Read more.
Clinical training at Japanese nursing universities has an increasing need for individualized learning support for students with potential learning disabilities. Despite a high interest in student support, educators’ difficulties are neglected. This study clarified the difficulties encountered by practical training instructors in delivering clinical training to nursing students with potential learning disabilities. In this descriptive, qualitative study, online focus group interviews were conducted. Participants were nine Japanese nursing university graduates with over five years of clinical education experience. A total of five categories were extracted: searching for measures tailored to students in a short period of time during training; resistance to individualized responses that significantly differ from traditional Japanese collectivist education; conflict over support being perceived as favoring a particular student; hesitation to identify students’ limits; and barriers in the process of supporting difficulties due to the nature of learning disabilities. Practical training instructors experience difficulties and hesitation when teaching students with potential learning disabilities. The practical training instructors need support and educational opportunities as well as students who need help. To overcome these difficulties, university educational staff, as well as students and families, must be educated on the existence and value of support tailored to the characteristics of an individual’s learning disability. Full article
10 pages, 396 KiB  
Article
Strategies Used in Canadian Nursing Programs to Prepare Students for NCLEX-RN® Licensure Exam
by Caroline Gibbons, Isdore Chola Shamputa, Michelle Le and Rose McCloskey
Healthcare 2023, 11(4), 613; https://doi.org/10.3390/healthcare11040613 - 18 Feb 2023
Viewed by 2174
Abstract
Nursing educators need strategies for preparing students to be successful in the National Council Licensure Examination (NCLEX-RN®). Understanding the educational practices used is an important step in informing curricular decisions and helping regulatory agencies evaluate nursing programs’ efforts to prepare students [...] Read more.
Nursing educators need strategies for preparing students to be successful in the National Council Licensure Examination (NCLEX-RN®). Understanding the educational practices used is an important step in informing curricular decisions and helping regulatory agencies evaluate nursing programs’ efforts to prepare students for practice. This study described strategies used in Canadian nursing programs to prepare students for the NCLEX-RN®. A cross-sectional descriptive national survey was completed by the program’s director, chair, dean, or another faculty member involved in the program’s NCLEX-RN® preparatory strategies using the LimeSurvey platform. Most participating programs (n = 24; 85.7%) use one to three strategies to prepare students for the NCLEX-RN®. Strategies include the requirement to purchase a commercial product, the administration of computer-based exams, NCLEX-RN® preparation courses or workshops, and time dedicated to NCLEX-RN® preparation in one or more courses. There is variation among Canadian nursing programs in how students are prepared for the NCLEX-RN®. Some programs invest considerable effort in preparation activities, while others have limited ones. Full article
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11 pages, 421 KiB  
Article
The Outcome-Present State Test Model of Clinical Reasoning to Promote Critical Thinking in Psychiatric Nursing Practice among Nursing Students: A Mixed Research Study
by Yu-Chin Ma, Jin-Ling Jiang and Yu-Chuan Lin
Healthcare 2023, 11(4), 545; https://doi.org/10.3390/healthcare11040545 - 12 Feb 2023
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 2493
Abstract
This study determined whether teaching intervention using the outcome-present state test (OPT) clinical reasoning model can effectively improve critical thinking in nursing students during a psychiatry internship. In addition, it evaluates the experiences of the students using this model in clinical practice. Methods: [...] Read more.
This study determined whether teaching intervention using the outcome-present state test (OPT) clinical reasoning model can effectively improve critical thinking in nursing students during a psychiatry internship. In addition, it evaluates the experiences of the students using this model in clinical practice. Methods: In this interventional study, 19 students were taught critical thinking skills using the OPT clinical reasoning model during a psychiatry clinical practice. Work-learning forms were used in daily 1 h individual and group discussions with students. The critical thinking disposition scale was completed by every student before and after the intervention. Moreover, the students were asked to the complete reflection experience forms. Results: The average critical thinking disposition pre-intervention score was 95.21, whereas the average post-intervention score was 97.05, indicating an increase of 1.84. There was a significant increase in the fourth dimension of open-mindedness (z = −2.80, p < 0.01). The learning experience has been likened to a process of clearing the fog, and it involves the use of limited known conditions, thinking outside the box, and adaptation to complex care issues. Conclusion: Using the OPT clinical reasoning model as a teaching strategy during a psychiatric nursing internship significantly improved the open-mindedness dimension among the students. The student reflective experience of talking to teachers as peers helped students identify clues and reframe problems related to clinical care. Additionally, the students reported that this led to more harmonious interactions with their teachers. Full article
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10 pages, 254 KiB  
Article
Attitudes toward Nursing Profession and Fear of Infectious Diseases among Undergraduate Nursing Students: A Cross-Sectional Study
by Abdulaziz Mofdy Almarwani, Fahad M. Alhowaymel, Naif S. Alzahrani and Hanan F. Alharbi
Healthcare 2023, 11(2), 229; https://doi.org/10.3390/healthcare11020229 - 12 Jan 2023
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 2500
Abstract
The uncertainty surrounding the effect of infectious diseases on nursing students’ attitudes toward the nursing profession worldwide exists. This study sought to examine the association between fear of infectious diseases and students’ attitudes toward the nursing profession. Methods: This quantitative descriptive cross-sectional study [...] Read more.
The uncertainty surrounding the effect of infectious diseases on nursing students’ attitudes toward the nursing profession worldwide exists. This study sought to examine the association between fear of infectious diseases and students’ attitudes toward the nursing profession. Methods: This quantitative descriptive cross-sectional study used a convenience sample of 477 students enrolled in nursing programs from three universities located in urban and non-urban areas in Saudi Arabia. Results: The study revealed a positive attitude toward nursing and minimal fear of infectious diseases. Junior nursing students reported significantly better attitudes and preferences toward the nursing profession than senior nursing students. Students who reported positive attitudes toward the nursing profession significantly had no intension to discontinue or transfer from nursing programs, whereas students with low attitudes reported significant intention to discontinue their enrollment in the nursing programs. Students in urban universities reported higher significant fear of infectious diseases compare to non-urban. The study revealed a significant negative correlation between fear of infectious diseases and students’ preference for the nursing profession. Conclusions: Nurse educators need to support senior nursing students’ attitudes toward the nursing profession and reduce their fear of infectious diseases, particularly among students studying in urban areas. Full article
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