New Advances in Health Technology for Women

A special issue of Healthcare (ISSN 2227-9032). This special issue belongs to the section "Women's Health Care".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 30 June 2024 | Viewed by 6812

Special Issue Editor


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Guest Editor
Maternal Fetal Medicine Center, Obstetrics and Gynaecology, Gleneagles Hospital Hong Kong, Hong Kong SAR, China
Interests: obstetrics; gynaecology; maternal and fetal medicine; obstetric ultrasound

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Women’s health plays a very important role in family health and in community health and is considered the root of public health. In 2019, the Royal College of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists published a document on ‘improving the health and wellbeing of girls and women’. Using technology to improve women’s health, female-led technology (femtech) industry is growing.

Technologies commonly used in women’s healthcare include ultrasonography, genetic testing, minimal invasive surgery (MIS), and assisted reproductive technology (ART). Over the years, there have been significant advancements in these technologies, such as new modes of three-/four-dimensional ultrasonography and color flow imaging, cell-free DNA testing, next-generation sequencing, pre-implantation genetic testing, robotic surgery, and pelvic embolization. Other emerging technologies include whole exome sequencing (WES), personalized medicine, and high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU). In addition, artificial intelligence (AI) and machine learning (ML) have been used for predictive analysis as well as for image recognition to facilitate diagnosis. Use of telehealth and remote patient monitoring (RPM) also became more common during the COVID-19 pandemic.

This Special Issue of Healthcare seeks original research, short reports, reviews, and opinion papers on the use of advance technologies in the following areas of women’s health: pregnancy, reproductive health, sexual health, menopausal health, and cancer. Papers discussing the advantages of using these new technologies, the challenges encountered, and more importantly, the effects on clinical outcomes are welcome.

The aim of this Special Issue is to focus on new and emerging technologies on women’s health. This Special Issue is envisaged to be of interest to clinicians, researchers, and industry and to have impact on women’s health, healthcare, and health policy.

Dr. Kwok-Yin Leung
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Healthcare is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2700 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • women’s health
  • pregnancy
  • ultrasound
  • cell-free DNA
  • whole-exome sequencing
  • high-intensity focused ultrasound
  • pelvic embolization
  • robotic surgery
  • reproduction
  • cancer
  • menopause
  • artificial intelligence

Published Papers (3 papers)

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Research

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14 pages, 233 KiB  
Article
Application of Prenatal Whole Exome Sequencing for Structural Congenital Anomalies—Experience from a Local Prenatal Diagnostic Laboratory
by Theodora Hei Tung Lai, Leung Kuen Sandy Au, Yuen Ting Eunice Lau, Hei Man Lo, Kelvin Yuen Kwong Chan, Ka Wang Cheung, Teresa Wei Ling Ma, Wing Cheong Leung, Choi Wah Kong, Wendy Shu, Po Lam So, Anna Ka Yee Kwong, Christopher Chun Yu Mak, Mianne Lee, Martin Man Chun Chui, Brian Hon Yin Chung and Anita Sik Yau Kan
Healthcare 2022, 10(12), 2521; https://doi.org/10.3390/healthcare10122521 - 13 Dec 2022
Cited by 3 | Viewed by 1803
Abstract
Fetal structural congenital abnormalities (SCAs) complicate 2–3% of all pregnancies. Whole-exome sequencing (WES) has been increasingly adopted prenatally when karyotyping and chromosomal microarray do not yield a diagnosis. This is a retrospective cohort study of 104 fetuses with SCAs identified on antenatal ultrasound [...] Read more.
Fetal structural congenital abnormalities (SCAs) complicate 2–3% of all pregnancies. Whole-exome sequencing (WES) has been increasingly adopted prenatally when karyotyping and chromosomal microarray do not yield a diagnosis. This is a retrospective cohort study of 104 fetuses with SCAs identified on antenatal ultrasound in Hong Kong, where whole exome sequencing is performed. Molecular diagnosis was obtained in 25 of the 104 fetuses (24%). The highest diagnostic rate was found in fetuses with multiple SCAs (29.2%), particularly those with involvement of the cardiac and musculoskeletal systems. Variants of uncertain significance were detected in 8 out of the 104 fetuses (7.7%). Our study shows the utility of WES in the prenatal setting, and the extended use of the technology would be recommended in addition to conventional genetic workup. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue New Advances in Health Technology for Women)

Review

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13 pages, 4587 KiB  
Review
Application of Color Doppler with 3- and 4-Dimensional Ultrasonography in the Prenatal Evaluation of Fetal Extracardiac and Placental Abnormalities
by Kwok-Yin Leung
Healthcare 2023, 11(4), 488; https://doi.org/10.3390/healthcare11040488 - 8 Feb 2023
Viewed by 1818
Abstract
Using color Doppler flow imaging or high-definition flow imaging with three-dimensional volume or spatio-temporal image correlation (STIC) in the glass-body mode allows displaying both gray-scale and color information of the heart cycle-related flow events and vessel spatial relationship. Conventionally, STIC in the glass-body [...] Read more.
Using color Doppler flow imaging or high-definition flow imaging with three-dimensional volume or spatio-temporal image correlation (STIC) in the glass-body mode allows displaying both gray-scale and color information of the heart cycle-related flow events and vessel spatial relationship. Conventionally, STIC in the glass-body mode has been used to examine the fetal heart and assess heart defects. Recently, a novel application of STIC in the visualization of abdominal precordial veins and intraplacental vascularization in singleton pregnancies has been reported. The aim of this present review is to discuss the use of color Doppler with three- and four-dimensional ultrasonography in the evaluation of extracardiac, placental, umbilical cord and twin abnormalities with examples. The glass-body mode is complementary to conventional 2D ultrasonography. Further studies are required to investigate use of the glass-body mode in the assessment of intraplacental vascularization in singleton and twin pregnancies. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue New Advances in Health Technology for Women)
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Other

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8 pages, 6113 KiB  
Brief Report
Comparison of One-Stage and Two-Stage Intraoperative Uterine Artery Embolization during Cesarean Delivery for Placenta Accreta: Report of Two Clinical Cases at a Tertiary Referral Medical Center
by Zhu-Wei Lim, Wei-Yang Lee, Yuan-Chun Huang, Wan-Ju Wu and Ming Chen
Healthcare 2022, 10(5), 774; https://doi.org/10.3390/healthcare10050774 - 22 Apr 2022
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 2206
Abstract
Placenta accreta spectrum (PAS) described the anchoring placental villi attached or penetrating into/through the myometrium. PAS is clinically important because of the unpredictable bleeding amount when manually removing the defective decidualization at the endometrial-myometrial interface. Therefore, a multidisciplinary strategy for cesarean delivery with [...] Read more.
Placenta accreta spectrum (PAS) described the anchoring placental villi attached or penetrating into/through the myometrium. PAS is clinically important because of the unpredictable bleeding amount when manually removing the defective decidualization at the endometrial-myometrial interface. Therefore, a multidisciplinary strategy for cesarean delivery with PAS is crucial. Postoperative embolization after cesarean hysterectomy in a hybrid suite was studied by many scientists. In this study, we demonstrated two cases of intraoperative embolization without hysterectomy in a hybrid operating room for cesarean delivery with placenta accreta. Our results show that intraoperative uterine artery embolization with a hybrid suite is a time-preserving and safe method for cesarean delivery with PAS owing to avoiding the risk of morbidity and mortality during patient transfer. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue New Advances in Health Technology for Women)
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