Special Issue "Stress and Health: Understanding the Effects and Examining Interventions"

A special issue of Healthcare (ISSN 2227-9032).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 1 December 2020.

Special Issue Editor

Dr. Alyx Taylor
Website SciProfiles
Guest Editor
School of Psychology, Sport and Physical Activity, Department of Physiology, AECC University College, Bournemouth, BH5 2DF, UK
Interests: human stress response; mental health; neuroendocrinology; HPA-axis; neurophysiology; affective disorders; gene x environment interactions; child development; interventions for stress management; multi-modal rehabilitation for stress

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Modern life is associated with high levels of stress for many people. Stress factors include work, living conditions, financial resources, personal relationships, and the physical or mental health status of the individual and their family members. Many professional groups such as those in public services including healthcare workers are exposed to high levels of stress in the course of their work. 

Some people appear to manage high-stress situations without negative effects, and some even report that they thrive on high stress levels, for example, at work. However, other people are unable to manage the stress factors in their lives and report negative responses to stress. 

There is research evidence to support associations between specific stressors and physical or mental health problems in different groups of people. There is also increasing research evidence to demonstrate pathways by which children may be negatively affected by maternal experiences of stress, both in utero and throughout development. This can lead to health problems in the next generation. In this way, the negative effects of stress can become a further burden for individuals and society. Innovative research is being undertaken to find ways to mitigate the effects of unavoidable stress, to improve the health of individuals, and to reduce the cost of stress to society. 

Dr. Alyx Taylor
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Healthcare is an international peer-reviewed open access quarterly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1400 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • human stress response;
  • neuroendocrinology;
  • HPA-axis; neurophysiology;
  • affective disorders;
  • gene x environment interactions;
  • child development;
  • social support; sense of coherence;
  • pharmacological intervention;
  • cognitive behavioral therapy;
  • physical exercise; yoga;
  • mindfulness;
  • multi-modal rehabilitation for stress.

Published Papers (1 paper)

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Research

Open AccessArticle
How to Relax in Stressful Situations: A Smart Stress Reduction System
Healthcare 2020, 8(2), 100; https://doi.org/10.3390/healthcare8020100 - 16 Apr 2020
Abstract
Stress is an inescapable element of the modern age. Instances of untreated stress may lead to a reduction in the individual’s health, well-being and socio-economic situation. Stress management application development for wearable smart devices is a growing market. The use of wearable smart [...] Read more.
Stress is an inescapable element of the modern age. Instances of untreated stress may lead to a reduction in the individual’s health, well-being and socio-economic situation. Stress management application development for wearable smart devices is a growing market. The use of wearable smart devices and biofeedback for individualized real-life stress reduction interventions has received less attention. By using our unobtrusive automatic stress detection system for use with consumer-grade smart bands, we first detected stress levels. When a high stress level is detected, our system suggests the most appropriate relaxation method by analyzing the physical activity-based contextual information. In more restricted contexts, physical activity is lower and mobile relaxation methods might be more appropriate, whereas in free contexts traditional methods might be useful. We further compared traditional and mobile relaxation methods by using our stress level detection system during an eight day EU project training event involving 15 early stage researchers (mean age 28; gender 9 Male, 6 Female). Participants’ daily stress levels were monitored and a range of traditional and mobile stress management techniques was applied. On day eight, participants were exposed to a ‘stressful’ event by being required to give an oral presentation. Insights about the success of both traditional and mobile relaxation methods by using the physiological signals and collected self-reports were provided. Full article
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