Special Issue "Advances in Otolaryngology from Diagnosis to Treatment"

A special issue of Healthcare (ISSN 2227-9032).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (1 December 2021) | Viewed by 6635

Special Issue Editors

Prof. Dr. Arianna Di Stadio
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
1. Department of Otolaryngology, University of Perugia, 06123 Perugia, Italy
2. Neuroinflammation Lab, UCL Queen Square Neurology, London WC1E 6BT, UK
Interests: otology; hearing loss; cochlear implant; hearing aids; bahi; facial nerve; facial plastic surgery; neuroscience; multiple sclerosis; memory; head and neck; microrna; speech disorders
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals
Dr. Massimo Ralli
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Sense Organs, Sapienza University of Rome, 00186 Rome, Italy
Interests: audiology; vestibular disordes; hearing loss; tinnitus; head and neck cancer; laryngology
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Research in medicine is fundamental and this Special Issue is dedicated to all advances and innovations in otorhinolaryngology. New methods of diagnosis and innovation in treatment are fundamental steps to improve the quality of cure and the quality of life for patients affected by otolaryngologic disorders. This Special Issue aims to stimulate discussions among clinicians and researchers about innovative treatments. Clinical and basic research papers are both accepted.

We are interested in medical hypotheses, innovative case reports, case–control studies and clinical trials. Reviews and meta-analyses should be focused on specific aspects and bring innovation.

Best Regards
Prof. Dr. Arianna Di Stadio
Prof. Dr. Massimo Ralli
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Healthcare is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1800 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • hearing
  • laryngology
  • hearing rehabilitation
  • vestibular disorders
  • neuroscience
  • oncology
  • facial plastic
  • otolaryngology

Related Special Issue

Published Papers (6 papers)

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Research

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Article
Knowledge, Attitude, and Practice of Intranasal Corticosteroid in Allergic Rhinitis Patients: Development of a New Questionnaire
Healthcare 2022, 10(1), 8; https://doi.org/10.3390/healthcare10010008 - 22 Dec 2021
Viewed by 779
Abstract
Objectives: The knowledge gap and attitude of allergic rhinitis (AR) patients using intranasal corticosteroid (INCS) led to the poor outcome of their disease. We aimed to develop and validate a new questionnaire to assess the knowledge, attitude, and practice (KAP) of AR patients [...] Read more.
Objectives: The knowledge gap and attitude of allergic rhinitis (AR) patients using intranasal corticosteroid (INCS) led to the poor outcome of their disease. We aimed to develop and validate a new questionnaire to assess the knowledge, attitude, and practice (KAP) of AR patients that can be used to assess and understand the factors affecting compliance of INCS. Methods: The questionnaire comprised development and validation stages. A self-administered questionnaire was developed after a comprehensive literature review. It was subjected to content and face validity before a revised final version was drafted. Exploratory factor analysis was used to assess the validity of the questionnaire. Cronbach’s alpha was used to verify internal consistency. Results: The development phase resulted in a questionnaire consisting of 14 items. Explanatory factor analysis revealed four factors associated with KAP. The four factors were extracted, and 12 items were kept. The factors were attitude domain with four items (factor 1), practice domain with four items (factor 2), and knowledge domain with four items (factor 3 has two items, and factor 4 has two items). The Cronbach’s alpha of the four factors ranged from 0.614 to 0.809. The final questionnaire consists of 3 domains with 12 items (the knowledge domain with four questions; the attitude domain with four questions; the practice domain with four questions) and was valid and reliable. Conclusions: The newly developed questionnaire has adequate validity and reliability. It is a useful tool to improve the treatment of AR patients by understanding the factors affecting their compliance. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advances in Otolaryngology from Diagnosis to Treatment)
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Article
Acute High Level Noise Exposure Can Cause Physiological Dysfunction in Macaque Monkeys: Insight on the Medical Protection for Special Working Environmental Personnel
Healthcare 2021, 9(7), 840; https://doi.org/10.3390/healthcare9070840 - 02 Jul 2021
Viewed by 671
Abstract
The high level noise caused by intense acoustic weapons and blasting is a common source of acute acoustic trauma faced by some special environmental personnel. Studies have shown that high level noise can cause auditory and non-auditory effects. However, there are few reports [...] Read more.
The high level noise caused by intense acoustic weapons and blasting is a common source of acute acoustic trauma faced by some special environmental personnel. Studies have shown that high level noise can cause auditory and non-auditory effects. However, there are few reports on the biological effects, especially the non-auditory effects of acute high level noise exposure in simulated special working environments, and the great differences between experimental animals and human beings make it difficult to extrapolate from research conclusions. In this study, macaque monkeys were used to detect the effects of acute high level noise exposure on hearing, cognition, and cardiovascular function. Auditory brainstem response, auditory P300, and electrocardiogram (ECG) of macaque monkeys were measured. Results showed that acute high level noise exposure caused permanent hearing threshold shifts; partial hearing loss which couldn’t recover to normal levels in the detection period; pathological changes in T wave and QRS complexes; and large fluctuations in cognitive ability after exposure, which finally recovered to normal. These alterations may be a combination of effects caused by stress-induced neuroendocrine dysfunction and mechanical damage of auditory organs. To elaborate the exact mechanism, further studies are still needed. Meanwhile, positive measures should be taken to reduce the incidence of acute high level noise injury. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advances in Otolaryngology from Diagnosis to Treatment)
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Review

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Review
The Role of Probiotics in Chronic Rhinosinusitis Treatment: An Update of the Current Literature
Healthcare 2021, 9(12), 1715; https://doi.org/10.3390/healthcare9121715 - 12 Dec 2021
Viewed by 790
Abstract
Chronic rhinosinusitis (CRS) is a significant health problem. It affects 5–12% of the general population. The causes that underlie the onset of CRS are not yet well known. However, many factors may contribute to its onset, such as environmental factors and the host’s [...] Read more.
Chronic rhinosinusitis (CRS) is a significant health problem. It affects 5–12% of the general population. The causes that underlie the onset of CRS are not yet well known. However, many factors may contribute to its onset, such as environmental factors and the host’s general condition. Medical treatment mainly uses local corticosteroids, nasal irrigation, and antibiotics. In recent years, a new therapeutic approach that employs the use of probiotics emerged. Probiotics have been extensively studied as a therapy for dysbiosis and inflammatory pathologies of various parts of the body. We aimed to examine the studies in vivo and in vitro and clinicals reports in the existing literature to update probiotics’ role in rhinosinusitis chronic medical treatment. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advances in Otolaryngology from Diagnosis to Treatment)
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Review
Review of Pharmacotherapy for Tinnitus
Healthcare 2021, 9(6), 779; https://doi.org/10.3390/healthcare9060779 - 21 Jun 2021
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 2196
Abstract
Various medications are currently used in the treatment of tinnitus, including anesthetics, antiarrhythmics, anticonvulsants, antidepressants, antihistamines, antipsychotics, anxiolytics, calcium channel blockers, cholinergic antagonists, NMDA antagonists, muscle relaxants, vasodilators, and vitamins. To date, however, no medications have been specifically approved to treat tinnitus by [...] Read more.
Various medications are currently used in the treatment of tinnitus, including anesthetics, antiarrhythmics, anticonvulsants, antidepressants, antihistamines, antipsychotics, anxiolytics, calcium channel blockers, cholinergic antagonists, NMDA antagonists, muscle relaxants, vasodilators, and vitamins. To date, however, no medications have been specifically approved to treat tinnitus by the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA). In addition, medicines used to treat other diseases, as well as foods and other ingested materials, can result in unwanted tinnitus. These include alcohol, antineoplastic chemotherapeutic agents and heavy metals, antimetabolites, antitumor agents, antibiotics, caffeine, cocaine, marijuana, nonnarcotic analgesics and antipyretics, ototoxic antibiotics and diuretics, oral contraceptives, quinine and chloroquine, and salicylates. This review, therefore, describes the medications currently used to treat tinnitus, including their mechanisms of action, therapeutic effects, dosages, and side-effects. In addition, this review describes the medications, foods, and other ingested agents that can induce unwanted tinnitus, as well as their mechanisms of action. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advances in Otolaryngology from Diagnosis to Treatment)
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Review
Otitis Media and Obesity—An Unusual Relationship in Children
Healthcare 2021, 9(4), 458; https://doi.org/10.3390/healthcare9040458 - 14 Apr 2021
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 1005
Abstract
Otitis media (OM) represents a public health matter, being the main cause of preventable hearing loss in pediatric patients. Besides well-established risk factors for developing OM, such as craniofacial abnormalities, prematurity, low birth weight, or tobacco exposure, there is evidence that obesity could [...] Read more.
Otitis media (OM) represents a public health matter, being the main cause of preventable hearing loss in pediatric patients. Besides well-established risk factors for developing OM, such as craniofacial abnormalities, prematurity, low birth weight, or tobacco exposure, there is evidence that obesity could be associated with a high incidence of OM. Our aim is to perform a literature review on the state of current published research on the relationship between OM and obesity and to discuss the interconnectivity between these two entities. We conducted an electronic search in PubMed and EMBASE databases. Out of 176 references, 15 articles were included in our study. Our findings suggest that obesity and overweight might be risk factors for developing OM, and vice versa. The main mechanisms for developing OM in obese patients include alteration in cytokine profile, increased gastroesophageal reflux, and/or fat accumulation. Conversely, ear infections exposure might increase the risk of obesity, mostly by taste changes through middle ear cavity inflammation. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advances in Otolaryngology from Diagnosis to Treatment)
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Other

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Systematic Review
Sedation with Intranasal Dexmedetomidine in the Pediatric Population for Auditory Brainstem Response Testing: Review of the Existing Literature
Healthcare 2022, 10(2), 287; https://doi.org/10.3390/healthcare10020287 - 01 Feb 2022
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Abstract
Background: Intranasal dexmedetomidine (IN DEX) is a relatively new sedative agent with supporting evidence on its efficacy and safety, which can be used for procedural sedation in children, and could have a major role in auditory brainstem response testing, especially in the case [...] Read more.
Background: Intranasal dexmedetomidine (IN DEX) is a relatively new sedative agent with supporting evidence on its efficacy and safety, which can be used for procedural sedation in children, and could have a major role in auditory brainstem response testing, especially in the case of non-cooperative children. The goal of this systematic review is to assess the role of IN DEX in ABR testing, evaluating the reported protocol, potential, and limits. Methods: We performed a comprehensive search strategy on PubMed, Scopus, and Google Scholar, including studies in English on the pediatric population, without time restrictions. Results: Six articles, published between 2016 and 2021, were included in the systematic review. Sedation effectiveness was high across the studies, except for one study; 3 μg/kg was the dosing most often used. A comparison group was present in three studies, with oral chloral hydrate as the drug of comparison. Adverse effects were rarely reported. Conclusion: This systematic review showed how IN DEX can represent an adequate sedative for children undergoing ABR testing; larger and more rigorous trials are warranted in order to recommend its systematic utilization. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advances in Otolaryngology from Diagnosis to Treatment)
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