Topical Collection "Nutrition and Public Health"

Editor

Prof. Dr. Sampath Parthasarathy
E-Mail Website
Collection Editor
Burnett School of Biomedical Sciences, College of Medicine, University of Central Florida, 8829 Kastler street, Orlando, FL 32727, USA
Interests: atherosclerosis; heart failure mechanisms; cardiovascular pharmacology; cardiovascular nutrition; fatty acids; lipids and lipoproteins; oxidative stress and antioxidants; endometriosis; macrophages
Special Issues and Collections in MDPI journals

Topical Collection Information

Dear Colleagues,

Nutrition at one time was taught in schools, yet was rarely used except to provide guidelines for diabetic patients who needed to control their diet. Insurance companies neglected the use of nutritional counseling as a means of preventing or controlling diseases. On the other hand, cultures from every part of the world were aware of the value of nutrition-based therapies as a kind of folk medicine. Often strict guidelines were in place to follow specific diets when ailing patients were treated. With the advent of the Internet culture and the massive amount of health and nutritional material freely available to the public, nutrition-based therapies have become highly popular. Combined with the expenses associated with non-nutritional therapies, more and more people are turning to nutritional means of treating disease.

Unfortunately, most medical schools shy away from teaching and practicing non-pharmacological means of dealing with diseases. The sad outcome is that only nutritionists, exercise physiologists, and other non-medical allied health professionals practice primary prevention of diseases.

People, in general, are now realizing that proper nutrition could lead to better health outcomes, not only for patients, but also could improve the quality of health of communities, and of society at large. There are many advantages such as cost saving, easily available resources, and independence from medical insurance. Many communities and hospitals are engaging in food and lifestyle modulation practices to the benefit of their patients and communities. However, nutrition is still in its infancy and often misunderstood. People are confused about daily recommendations and often contradictory claims of what amounts to good and bad nutrition.

This proposed section is geared to put nutrition health in perspective and provide guidelines for patients, communities and the general public to help them understand and follow nutritional guidelines that might be appropriate for them.

Prof. Dr. Sampath Parthasarathy
Collection Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

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Keywords

  • nutraceuticals
  • primary prevention
  • lifestyle modulation
  • alternative medicine
  • Internet nutrition

Published Papers (2 papers)

2018

Open AccessArticle
Comparison of Perceived and Observed Hand Hygiene Compliance in Healthcare Workers in MERS-CoV Endemic Regions
Healthcare 2018, 6(4), 122; https://doi.org/10.3390/healthcare6040122 - 07 Oct 2018
Abstract
This study investigated healthcare workers’ perceptions of hand hygiene practices by comparing personal reports, as assessed by questionnaires, to direct observations of the workers’ hand hygiene practices. The study employed a cross-sectional research design. Observations were made using a 16-item checklist, based on [...] Read more.
This study investigated healthcare workers’ perceptions of hand hygiene practices by comparing personal reports, as assessed by questionnaires, to direct observations of the workers’ hand hygiene practices. The study employed a cross-sectional research design. Observations were made using a 16-item checklist, based on three sources: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), World Health Organization (WHO), and Boyce and Pittet’s guidelines of hand hygiene. The checklist was used for both direct-observation and self-reported data collection purposes. Pearson correlation and Multivariate Analysis of Covariance (MANCOVA) were utilized to statistically determine the relationship between healthcare workers’ reports of hand hygiene practices and observed hand hygiene behaviors. The study was conducted in the outpatient examination rooms and emergency departments of three types of hospitals in the Eastern region of Saudi Arabia where Middle East respiratory syndrome coronavirus (MERS-CoV) is endemic and is observed in routine cases and outbreaks. The total sample size included 87 physicians and nurses recruited while on duty during the scheduled observation periods, with each healthcare worker being observed during individual medical examinations with at least three patients. No statistically significant correlations between the healthcare workers’ perceptions of hand hygiene practices and healthcare workers’ actual behaviors were evident. Based on the self-report questionnaires, significant differences were found between physicians’ and nurses’ hand hygiene practices reports. Healthcare workers clearly understand the importance of careful hand hygiene practices, but based on researchers’ observations, the medical personnel failed to properly implement protocol-driven hand hygiene applications. However, the significant differences between physicians’ and nurses’ self-reports suggest further inquiry is needed to fully explore these discrepancies. Full article
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Open AccessReview
Assessment of Health Information Technology Interventions in Evidence-Based Medicine: A Systematic Review by Adopting a Methodological Evaluation Framework
Healthcare 2018, 6(3), 109; https://doi.org/10.3390/healthcare6030109 - 31 Aug 2018
Abstract
Background: The application of Health Information Technologies (HITs) can be an effective way to advance medical research and health services provision. The two-fold objective of this work is to: (i) identify and review state-of-the-art HITs that facilitate the aims of evidence-based [...] Read more.
Background: The application of Health Information Technologies (HITs) can be an effective way to advance medical research and health services provision. The two-fold objective of this work is to: (i) identify and review state-of-the-art HITs that facilitate the aims of evidence-based medicine and (ii) propose a methodology for HIT assessment. Methods: The systematic review was conducted according to the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses (PRISMA) guidelines. Furthermore, we consolidated existing knowledge in the field and proposed a Synthesis Framework for the Assessment of Health Information Technology (SF/HIT) in order to evaluate the joint use of Randomized Controlled Trials (RCTs) along with HITs in the field of evidence-based medicine. Results: 55 articles met the inclusion criteria and refer to 51 (RCTs) published between 2008 and 2016. Significant improvements in healthcare through the use of HITs were observed in the findings of 31 out of 51 trials—60.8%. We also confirmed that RCTs are valuable tools for assessing the effectiveness, acceptability, safety, privacy, appropriateness, satisfaction, performance, usefulness and adherence. Conclusions: To improve health service delivery, RCTs apply and exhibit formalization by providing measurable outputs. Towards this direction, we propose the SF/HIT as a framework which may help researchers to carry out appropriate evaluations and extend their studies. Full article
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