From Heart to Brain: Innovations in Cardiovascular and Stroke Research

A special issue of Healthcare (ISSN 2227-9032).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 30 November 2024 | Viewed by 5039

Special Issue Editor


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Guest Editor
Discipline of Pharmacy, School of Health Sciences, Faculty of Health, University of Canberra, Canberra 2617, Australia
Interests: venous thromboembolism; stroke; thrombosis; coagulation; platelets; prevention; risk assessment; diabetes
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Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Welcome to our Special Issue of “From Heart to Brain: Innovations in Cardiovascular and Stroke Research”. We seek to assess and publish groundbreaking research that explores cardiovascular and/or cerebrovascular disease from prevention, screening, diagnosis, or patient management perspectives. We are inviting researchers from diverse backgrounds to submit their quantitative, qualitative, or mixed-method research for publication (in open access). Studies using cutting-edge technologies and artificial intelligence are highly sought after. With your support, we aim to pave the way for groundbreaking advances in this field; this being the case, please join us in this exciting journey. Submissions of all types of manuscripts (clinical trials, cohort studies, case-control studies, case reports, review articles, etc.) will be received for peer review. The following are some topics of interest:

  • Precision medicine in cardiovascular disease/stroke.
  • Risk factors and risk assessment for cardiovascular disease/stroke.
  • Role of inflammation in cardiovascular disease/stroke.
  • Atherosclerosis.
  • Thromboembolism.
  • Coronary artery disease.
  • Atrial fibrillation.
  • Heart failure.
  • Hypertension.
  • Endovascular treatments.
  • Imaging or non-imaging techniques.
  • Psychosocial and emotional aspects of cardiovascular as well as stroke recovery and care.
  • Innovations in stroke rehabilitation.
  • Malignancies of the heart or brain.

For enquires, please contact the Guest Editor, Dr. Reza Mortazavi, at [email protected].

Dr. Reza Mortazavi
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Healthcare is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2700 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • heart disease
  • cardiovascular
  • cerebrovascular accident
  • diagnostic imaging
  • prevention and control
  • risk factors
  • atrial fibrillation
  • stroke
  • ischemic, hemorrhagic, and precision medicine
  • anticoagulation
  • fibrinolysis

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

11 pages, 743 KiB  
Article
Mid-Term Results of an Italian Multicentric Experience with the RoadsaverTM Dual-Layer Carotid Stent System
by Olga Silvestri, Giulio Accarino, Davide Turchino, Francesco Squizzato, Michele Piazza, Martina Bastianon, Sara Di Gregorio, Giovanni Pratesi, Michele Antonello, Davide Costa, Raffaele Serra and Umberto Marcello Bracale
Healthcare 2024, 12(1), 120; https://doi.org/10.3390/healthcare12010120 - 4 Jan 2024
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 976
Abstract
Background: Carotid artery stenting (CAS) using first-generation single-layer stents is widely accepted as a good alternative to standard carotid endarterectomy (CEA) but it is associated with worse outcomes in terms of both plaque prolapse and cerebral embolization. Aim: To evaluate the perioperative and [...] Read more.
Background: Carotid artery stenting (CAS) using first-generation single-layer stents is widely accepted as a good alternative to standard carotid endarterectomy (CEA) but it is associated with worse outcomes in terms of both plaque prolapse and cerebral embolization. Aim: To evaluate the perioperative and midterm outcomes of CAS using the new-generation RoadsaverTM dual-layer micromesh-covered carotid stent. Methods: Herein, we present the results of an observational, retrospective, multicentric study on non-consecutive patients who underwent the CAS procedure between January 2017 and December 2022 at three Italian, high-volume vascular surgery centers. The inclusion criteria were the patients’ eligibility for the CAS procedure in accordance with the current Italian guidelines, and the implantation of a Roadsaver stent. Both symptomatic and asymptomatic patients were included in the study. The patients requiring reintervention for carotid restenosis following CEA were also included. Perioperative data regarding procedural success was defined as the successful implantation of the device in the desired position, less than 30% residual stenosis, and the absence of intraoperative neurological complications. The primary outcome was any adverse cerebrovascular event such as stroke or transient ischemic attack (TIA) during the procedure and/or after discharge. The secondary outcomes were the need for further intervention, and all-cause death following procedure. Results: Three-hundred-fifty-three (353) patients were included in our study; the mean age was 74.3 years. A total of 5.9% of the patients were symptomatic on their operated side, while 7.3% had contralateral carotid occlusion. A cerebral embolic protection device (CPD) was employed in all patients. A total of 13.3% of the patients were operated on for restenosis after CEA Technical success was achieved in 96.9% of the cases with an intraoperative report of six TIAs (1.7%) and six ipsilateral strokes (1.7%). The mean hospital stay was 1.8 days. The thirty-day follow up showed one TIA and one more stroke. At the mean 35-month follow-up time, the primary outcome was present in six patients (1.7%), where four TIAs (1.1%) and two strokes (0.5%) were reported. Restenosis occurred in five patients (1.4%). Death for any cause was reported in 11 patients (3.1%). Conclusions: As most recent, high-quality studies show, the CAS procedure with second-generation devices such as the Roadsaver stent is safe and effective in preventing carotid-related cerebrovascular events in both symptomatic and asymptomatic patients. The intraoperative and postoperative cerebrovascular complication rate in high volume centers is very low, ensuring confidence in its employment for the CAS procedure along with a CPD as a valid alternative to CEA. Full article
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9 pages, 561 KiB  
Article
Seasonal Pattern of Cerebrovascular Fatalities in Cancer Patients
by Velizar Shivarov, Hristo Shivarov and Angel Yordanov
Healthcare 2023, 11(4), 456; https://doi.org/10.3390/healthcare11040456 - 4 Feb 2023
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 1031
Abstract
Cancer patients are at increased risk of cerebrovascular events. The incidence of those events and the associated mortality are known to follow a seasonal pattern in the general population. However, it is unclear whether cerebrovascular mortality in cancer patients has seasonal variation. To [...] Read more.
Cancer patients are at increased risk of cerebrovascular events. The incidence of those events and the associated mortality are known to follow a seasonal pattern in the general population. However, it is unclear whether cerebrovascular mortality in cancer patients has seasonal variation. To address this question, we performed a retrospective analysis of the seasonality of deaths due to the fact of cerebrovascular diseases among patients with first primary malignancy registered between 1975 and 2016 in the SEER database. The presence of seasonality in death rates was modeled using the cosinor approach assuming a circa-annual pattern. A significant seasonal pattern with a peak in the first half of November was identified in all patient groups. The same peak was observed in almost all subgroups of patients defined based on demographic characteristics. However, not all entity-defined subgroups showed a seasonal pattern, which might be explained by the different pathologic processes affecting the circulatory system in each cancer type. Based on our findings, one can propose that the active monitoring of cancer patients for cerebrovascular events from the late autumn and during the winter can help in the reduction of mortality in this patient population. Full article
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