Special Issue "Healthcare in Dentistry"

A special issue of Healthcare (ISSN 2227-9032). This special issue belongs to the section "Nursing".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 May 2021.

Special Issue Editor

Prof. Dr. Massimo Corsalini
Website
Guest Editor
Interdisciplinary Department of Medicine, University of Bari, 70121 Bari, Italy
Interests: dental materials; fixed and removable prosthesis; craniomandibular disorders; oral rehabilitation in post-surgical defects; nanomaterials in dental prostheses
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Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

The wellbeing of the oral cavity has been of great interest in recent years. For this Special Issue, we wish to consider manuscripts that can lead to clarification of the aspects related to healthcare and oral pathologies, like simple and complex oral rehabilitation of edentulism both in normal patients and those affected by serious systemic diseases, the treatment and prevention of oral diseases, malocclusions, tempomandibular joint diseases. The use of nanotechnologies in the rehabilitation of patients with surgical outcomes, and the prevention and treatment of pathologies that can affect the presence of dental elements in the oral cavity. The published papers will contribute to achieving oral wellbeing and a better quality of life, suggesting possible suitable prevention and therapy protocols for the multiple pathologies of the oral cavity.

Prof. Dr. Massimo Corsalini
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Healthcare is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1600 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • oral health management
  • oral rehabilitation
  • oral pathologies treatment
  • well-being of the oral cavity
  • oral health prevention
  • oral health management
  • oral education

Published Papers (7 papers)

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Research

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Open AccessArticle
Medical Diagnoses, Mode of Residence, and Dental Treatment Demand under General Anesthesia in Special Needs Adults in Innsbruck, Austria. A Retrospective Breakdown of Four and a Half Years
Healthcare 2021, 9(3), 279; https://doi.org/10.3390/healthcare9030279 - 04 Mar 2021
Abstract
Regarding oral/dental care and attendance, special needs individuals depend on their caregivers’ commitment. The purpose of this retrospective data analysis of adults who received dental general anesthesia (DGA) in Innsbruck, Austria, was a breakdown of demographic parameters (including the mode of accommodation/care), medical [...] Read more.
Regarding oral/dental care and attendance, special needs individuals depend on their caregivers’ commitment. The purpose of this retrospective data analysis of adults who received dental general anesthesia (DGA) in Innsbruck, Austria, was a breakdown of demographic parameters (including the mode of accommodation/care), medical diagnoses (comprising intellectual/physical disablement (IPD) or psychiatric (anxiety) disorders (PDs)), and dental therapy performed under DGA. The sample was composed of 233 consecutive adults who underwent DGA from January 2015 to June 2019. Data were analyzed with descriptive and comparative statistics. In total, 133 (57.1%) subjects were male and 100 (42.9%) female; 176 (75.5%) had IPD and 57 (24.5%) PDs; 168 (72.1%) were living at private and 65 (27.9%) at nursing homes. Median age (IQR) was 35.6 (25.7–47.2) years. In the total sample, 5 (2–9) teeth were restored and 2 (0.5–6.5) teeth were extracted. Individuals with PDs had more teeth restored (p = 0.01) and extracted (p < 0.001) than individuals with IPD. Private home residents had more teeth restored (p < 0.001) but less teeth extracted (p = 0.003) than nursing home residents. Special needs individuals’ oral health backlog should be tackled in private and institutional care modalities alike. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Healthcare in Dentistry)
Open AccessArticle
The Role of Dental Occlusion and Neuromuscular Behavior in Professional Ballet Dancers’ Performance: A Pilot Study
Healthcare 2021, 9(3), 251; https://doi.org/10.3390/healthcare9030251 - 01 Mar 2021
Abstract
Clinical practice and some scientific evidence seem to suggest that there is some kind of relationship between the components that form the postural chain. For professional dancers, good posture and balance are essential. The aim of the present retrospective study is to evaluate [...] Read more.
Clinical practice and some scientific evidence seem to suggest that there is some kind of relationship between the components that form the postural chain. For professional dancers, good posture and balance are essential. The aim of the present retrospective study is to evaluate whether gnathological treatment could have an impact on the postural balance and sports performance of professional ballet dancers. Electromyographic (EMG) data and balance tests were recorded before and after six months of treatment with a customized occlusal splint. Twenty athletes were examined during ballet exercises in terms of balance and speed of execution by two experienced clinicians. The results showed statistically significant changes for all EMG tests carried out and the Flamingo Balance Test. It appears that the use of a customized occlusal device improved neuro-muscular coordination and the overall performance of dancers. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Healthcare in Dentistry)
Open AccessArticle
Complete-Arch Accuracy of Four Intraoral Scanners: An In Vitro Study
Healthcare 2021, 9(3), 246; https://doi.org/10.3390/healthcare9030246 - 01 Mar 2021
Abstract
The purpose of this study is to define the accuracy of four intraoral scanners (IOS) through the analysis of digital impressions of a complete dental arch model. Eight metal inserts were placed on the model as reference points and then it was scanned [...] Read more.
The purpose of this study is to define the accuracy of four intraoral scanners (IOS) through the analysis of digital impressions of a complete dental arch model. Eight metal inserts were placed on the model as reference points and then it was scanned with a laboratory scanner in order to obtain the reference model. Subsequently, the reference model was scanned with four IOS (Carestream 3600, CEREC Omnicam, True Definition Scanner, Trios 3Shape). Linear measurements were traced on an STL file between the chosen reference points and divided into four categories: three-element mesiodistal, five-element mesiodistal, diagonal, and contralateral measurements. The digital reference values for the measurements were then compared with the values obtained from the scans to analyze the accuracy of the IOS using ANOVA. There were no statistically significant differences between the measurements of the digital scans obtained with the four IOS systems for any of the measurement groups tested. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Healthcare in Dentistry)
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Open AccessArticle
Proton Therapy for Mandibula Plate Phantom
Healthcare 2021, 9(2), 167; https://doi.org/10.3390/healthcare9020167 - 04 Feb 2021
Viewed by 326
Abstract
Purpose: In this study, the required dose rates for optimal treatment of tumoral tissues when using proton therapy in the treatment of defective tumours seen in mandibles has been calculated. We aimed to protect the surrounding soft and hard tissues from unnecessary radiation [...] Read more.
Purpose: In this study, the required dose rates for optimal treatment of tumoral tissues when using proton therapy in the treatment of defective tumours seen in mandibles has been calculated. We aimed to protect the surrounding soft and hard tissues from unnecessary radiation as well as to prevent complications of radiation. Bragg curves of therapeutic energized protons for two different mandible (molar and premolar) plate phantoms were computed and compared with similar calculations in the literature. The results were found to be within acceptable deviation values. Methods: In this study, mandibular tooth plate phantoms were modelled for the molar and premolar areas and then a Monte Carlo simulation was used to calculate the Bragg curve, lateral straggle/range and recoil values of protons remaining in the therapeutic energy ranges. The mass and atomic densities of all the jawbone layers were selected and the effect of layer type and thickness on the Bragg curve, lateral straggle/range and the recoil were investigated. As protons move through different layers of density, lateral straggle and increases in the range were observed. A range of energies was used for the treatment of tumours at different depths in the mandible phantom. Results: Simulations revealed that as the cortical bone thickness increased, Bragg peak position decreased between 0.47–3.3%. An increase in the number of layers results in a decrease in the Bragg peak position. Finally, as the proton energy increased, the amplitude of the second peak and its effect on Bragg peak position decreased. Conclusion: These findings should guide the selection of appropriate energy levels in the treatment of tumour structures without damaging surrounding tissues. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Healthcare in Dentistry)
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Open AccessArticle
A Minimally Invasive Technique for Short Spiral Implant Insertion with Contextual Crestal Sinus Lifting in the Atrophic Maxilla: A Preliminary Report
Healthcare 2021, 9(1), 11; https://doi.org/10.3390/healthcare9010011 - 24 Dec 2020
Viewed by 330
Abstract
The most recently reported techniques for the rehabilitation of the atrophic posterior maxilla are increasingly less invasive, as they are generally oriented to avoid sinus floor elevation with lateral access. The authors describe a mini-invasive surgical technique for short spiral implant insertion for [...] Read more.
The most recently reported techniques for the rehabilitation of the atrophic posterior maxilla are increasingly less invasive, as they are generally oriented to avoid sinus floor elevation with lateral access. The authors describe a mini-invasive surgical technique for short spiral implant insertion for the prosthetic rehabilitation of the atrophic posterior maxilla, which could be considered a combination of several previously described techniques based on the under-preparation of the implant site to improve fixture primary stability and crestal approach to the sinus floor elevation without heterologous bone graft. Eighty short spiral implants were inserted in the molar area of the maxilla in patients with 4.5–6 mm of alveolar bone, measured on pre-operative computed tomography. The surgical technique involved careful drilling for the preparation of implant sites at differentiated depths, allowing bone dislocation in the apical direction, traumatic crestal sinus membrane elevation, and insertion of an implant (with spiral morphology) longer than pre-operative measurements. Prostheses were all single crowns. In all cases, a spiral implant 2–4 mm longer than the residual bone was placed. Only two implants were lost due to peri-implantitis but subsequently replaced and followed-up. Bone loss values around the implants after three months (at the re-opening) ranged from 0 to 0.6 mm, (median value: 0.1 mm), while after two years, the same values ranged from 0.4 to 1.3 mm (median value: 0.7 mm). Clinical post-operative complications did not occur. After ten years, no implant has been lost. Overall, the described protocol seems to show good results in terms of predictability and patient compliance. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Healthcare in Dentistry)
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Open AccessArticle
Influence of Dental Malocclusion on Body Posture and Foot Posture in Children: A Cross-Sectional Study
Healthcare 2020, 8(4), 485; https://doi.org/10.3390/healthcare8040485 - 14 Nov 2020
Viewed by 594
Abstract
The number of studies that investigate the correlations between the temporomandibular system and body posture, postural control, or the distribution of plantar pressure has recently been increasing. However, most of the existing information is not conclusive. Therefore, the study objective was to evaluate [...] Read more.
The number of studies that investigate the correlations between the temporomandibular system and body posture, postural control, or the distribution of plantar pressure has recently been increasing. However, most of the existing information is not conclusive. Therefore, the study objective was to evaluate if the features of dental malocclusion are correlated with body posture alterations at the lower limb level. This is a multicentre cross-sectional study with 289 children (8–14 years). Angle’s molar relation was analysed at the dental level. The postural control and the plantar pressure distribution were recorded via a force platform. Correlation and inferential analysis between the Angle class and the foot’s biomechanics were tested. The centre of gravity is anteriorised in Angle’s Class II in both the molar class (p ≤ 0.001) and the canine class (p ≤ 0.001). Likewise, a relationship was observed between the contact surface and Angle’s classes, being higher in class III than in II (p ≤ 0.001). The plantigrade phase is shortened in Angle’s Class III. A relationship was found between Angle’s Class II and a forward movement of the centre of gravity. No relationship was found between the Foot Posture Index and the truncated scaphoid height and the dental classification. An evident relationship between the gait typology and dental malocclusion was not found. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Healthcare in Dentistry)

Review

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Open AccessReview
Diode Laser Management of Primary Extranasopharyngeal Angiofibroma Presenting as Maxillary Epulis: Report of a Case and Literature Review
Healthcare 2021, 9(1), 33; https://doi.org/10.3390/healthcare9010033 - 01 Jan 2021
Viewed by 405
Abstract
Juvenile nasopharyngeal angiofibroma is a rare vascular neoplasm, mostly occurring in adolescent males, and representing 0.05% of all head and neck tumors. Nevertheless, it is usually recognized as the most common benign mesenchymal neoplasm of the nasopharynx. Usually, it originates from the posterolateral [...] Read more.
Juvenile nasopharyngeal angiofibroma is a rare vascular neoplasm, mostly occurring in adolescent males, and representing 0.05% of all head and neck tumors. Nevertheless, it is usually recognized as the most common benign mesenchymal neoplasm of the nasopharynx. Usually, it originates from the posterolateral wall of the nasopharynx and, although histologically benign, classically shows a locally aggressive behavior with bone destruction as well as spreading through natural foramina and/or fissures to the nasopharynx, nasal and paranasal cavities, spheno-palatine foramen, infratemporal fossa and, very rarely, to the cranial cavity. Extranasopharyngeal angiofibroma is considered a distinct entity due to older age at presentation, different localizations (outside the nasopharyngeal pterygopalatine fossa) and attenuated clinical course. Extranasopharyngeal angiofibroma has been sporadically described in the oral cavity. We report a case of extranasopharyngeal angiofibroma with primary and exclusive involvement of the adherent gingiva of the anterior maxilla, managed by preoperative diode laser trans-mucosal photocoagulation and subsequent surgical removal. The current literature on primary extranasopharyngeal angiofibroma is also reviewed. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Healthcare in Dentistry)
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