Body Image, Dissatisfaction and Eating Disorders: A Healthcare Perspective

A special issue of Healthcare (ISSN 2227-9032).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 December 2024 | Viewed by 385

Special Issue Editors


E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Faculty of Education, Universidad Católica de Murcia (UCAM), 30107 Murcia, Spain
Interests: psychology; mental health; sport, exercise and health
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

E-Mail Website
Guest Editor Assistant
Faculty of Education, Universidad Católica de Murcia (UCAM), 30107 Murcia, Spain
Interests: psychology; mental health; pedagogy

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Eating disorders are a real challenge for public health and healthcare providers. Their high prevalence in recent decades calls for a more in-depth analysis of their causes and development. Current research should continue to study clinical patterns in their evolution, but more information is also needed on maladaptive eating behaviors and the cognitive, emotional, and social factors associated with the perception of inadequate body image.

The aim of this Special Issue is to provide the latest advances on correlates and risk factors for the development of eating disorders in order to detect the most vulnerable individuals and carry out appropriate prevention interventions. In addition, more data are needed on the symptomatology presented by patients and the existing lines of treatment in order to facilitate the efforts of the professionals who care for them.

In this Special Issue, original research articles and reviews are welcome. Research areas may include (but are not limited to) the following:

  • Studies of risk factors and variables related to body image, body dissatisfaction, and eating disorders.
  • Treatment studies.
  • Prevention studies.
  • Systematic reviews and meta-analyses.
  • Epidemiologic studies.
  • Validation studies of existing assessment tools and introduction of new instruments.

We look forward to receiving your contributions.

Dr. Rosendo Berengüí
Guest Editor

Dr. María Ángeles Castejón
Guest Editor Assistant

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Healthcare is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2700 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • eating disorders
  • body image
  • body dissatisfaction
  • mental health
  • prevention
  • diagnosis
  • treatment
  • health assessment

Published Papers (1 paper)

Order results
Result details
Select all
Export citation of selected articles as:

Research

12 pages, 703 KiB  
Article
The Relationship and Effects of Self-Esteem and Body Shape on Eating Disorder Behavior: A Cross-Sectional Survey of Chinese University Students
by Zeng Gao, Jingyi Zhao, Sanying Peng and Han Yuan
Healthcare 2024, 12(10), 1034; https://doi.org/10.3390/healthcare12101034 - 16 May 2024
Viewed by 183
Abstract
Background: Eating disorders (EDs) have become a global public health concern among adolescents and young adults. However, Chinese university students exhibit a high prevalence of eating disorders. This study aims to investigate the effects of self-esteem (SE) and body shape (BS) on ED [...] Read more.
Background: Eating disorders (EDs) have become a global public health concern among adolescents and young adults. However, Chinese university students exhibit a high prevalence of eating disorders. This study aims to investigate the effects of self-esteem (SE) and body shape (BS) on ED behaviors among Chinese university students. Methods: Using random sampling, 946 Chinese university students (aged 18 to 24, M = 19.94, SD = 1.04) participated in a survey comprising the Sick, Control, One, Fat, and Food Questionnaire (SCOFF-Q), the Body Shape Questionnaire (BS-Q), and the Rosenberg Self-Esteem Scale (RS-S) to assess their eating disorder or non-eating disorder (NED) behavior. Results: There was a significant positive correlation between body shape and eating disorder behaviors (r = 0.19, p < 0.01), while there was a significant negative correlation between self-esteem and eating disorder behaviors (r = −0.14, p = 0.001 < 0.01). Gender was a moderating factor in the relationship between body shape and eating disorder behaviors (t = 3.14, p = 0.002 < 0.01), while parents’ marital status was a moderating factor in the relationship between self-esteem and eating disorder behavior (t = 2.72, p = 0.007 < 0.01). Body shape (z = 6.47, p = 0.001 < 0.01), self-esteem (z = −2.81, p = 0.005 < 0.05), and gender (z = 3.06, p = 0.002 < 0.01) significantly influenced eating disorder behavior among Chinese university students aged 18–24 years. Conclusions: There was a direct effect between body shape and self-esteem and eating disorder behaviors among Chinese university students aged 18–24 years. Alarmingly, female university students are becoming susceptible to external influences on self-esteem and body shape, leading to eating disorder behaviors at an increasingly younger age in China. Full article
Show Figures

Figure 1

Back to TopTop