Special Issue "Geodata Management"

A special issue of Geosciences (ISSN 2076-3263).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (15 April 2018)

Special Issue Editor

Guest Editor
Dr. Elena Camossi

NATO Science and Technology Organization, Centre for Maritime Research and Experimentation (CMRE), La Spezia, Italy
Website | E-Mail
Interests: geospatial and spatio-temporal data management; spatio-temporal data mining and knowledge discovery from data; spatio-temporal multi-granularity; ontologies and semantic-driven knowledge discovery

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Geodata management applies data management principles to geospatial data, promoting proper data curation and preservation to enable data discoverability, access, and sharing for geographical and spatio-temporal data produced in a number of different domains, from atmospheric to ocean data, biodiversity, forest, crop, urbanization, transportation and energy. Geodata management is then a key enabler for the development of global research infrastructures progressing research to tackle societal challenges like climate change, ocean and biodiversity preservation, clean and safe energy, food security, and providing evidence and facts in support of the related innovation policies. Scientists, decision makers, citizens, and entrepreneurs: All may benefit from the increased number of scientific geographical and spatio-temporal data produced when these comply with common standards and interoperable sharing services are used; they may further profit if data are harmonised, making a shift from metadata to data interoperability to enable full reuse of software and to allow smoothly to expand the analysis on enlarged areas.

Open issues to address relate to the semantic enrichment of data, as well as to the adoption of domain and cross-domain conventions and the definition of common vocabularies for observations variables to enable data reuse in multiple domains. Similarly, the specification of reference quality checks and standards for observation values is still work in progress in most application domains.

This Special Issue solicits contributions on geodata and spatio-temporal data management, to progress geodata interoperability towards uplifting existing geodata research infrastructures to provide an effective support to fact-driven e-governance and decision making and supporting the development of innovative geodata driven economical opportunities.

Dr. Elena Camossi
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Geosciences is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 850 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • experiences on domain and cross-domain application of geodata and spatio-temporal management standards
  • cross-domain geodata harmonisation initiatives and best practices
  • experiences on the reuse of open geodata
  • novel software solutions, services and architectures for geodata management
  • geodata research infrastructures
  • use of geodata for e-governance

Published Papers (5 papers)

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Research

Open AccessArticle
OGC-to-W3C Services: A Wrapper-Based Solution for Geospatial Metadata Exchange
Geosciences 2018, 8(7), 227; https://doi.org/10.3390/geosciences8070227
Received: 12 April 2018 / Revised: 19 June 2018 / Accepted: 19 June 2018 / Published: 22 June 2018
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Abstract
When trying to compose services that are developed according to different standards, interoperability issues arise that are often faced by developing ad-hoc solutions. A typical example is represented by the composition of W3C and OGC services, which were developed more or less concurrently [...] Read more.
When trying to compose services that are developed according to different standards, interoperability issues arise that are often faced by developing ad-hoc solutions. A typical example is represented by the composition of W3C and OGC services, which were developed more or less concurrently by independent organizations. In such a context, developing a wrapper that abstracts as much as possible the inner details and logic of a wrapped service well embraces the low-coupled nature of the general Service Oriented Computing paradigm. This paper focuses on the proper management of geospatial metadata into a W3C-based environment and is based on the development of a wrapper that exposes OGC functionality in a W3C-compliant way, thus overcoming the technical differences between the two types of services. To efficiently accomplish this task, a flexible, wrapper-based, and standard-compliant mechanism for metadata retrieval is proposed that avoids the use of third-party entities. The proposal exploits the scalable and adaptable nature of the WS-Metadata (Web Services Metadata) specification. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Geodata Management)
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Open AccessFeature PaperArticle
Extending INSPIRE to the Internet of Things through SensorThings API
Geosciences 2018, 8(6), 221; https://doi.org/10.3390/geosciences8060221
Received: 30 April 2018 / Revised: 5 June 2018 / Accepted: 12 June 2018 / Published: 16 June 2018
Cited by 1 | PDF Full-text (1201 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Spatial Data Infrastructures (SDI) established during the past two decades “unlocked” heterogeneous geospatial datasets. The European Union INSPIRE Directive laid down the foundation of a pan-European SDI where thousands of public sector data providers make their data, including sensor observations, available for cross-border [...] Read more.
Spatial Data Infrastructures (SDI) established during the past two decades “unlocked” heterogeneous geospatial datasets. The European Union INSPIRE Directive laid down the foundation of a pan-European SDI where thousands of public sector data providers make their data, including sensor observations, available for cross-border and cross-domain reuse. At the same time, SDIs should inevitably adopt new technology and standards to remain fit for purpose and address in the best possible way the needs of different stakeholders (government, businesses and citizens). Some of the recurring technical requirements raised by SDI stakeholders include: (i) the need for adoption of RESTful architectures; together with (ii) alternative (to GML) data encodings, such as JavaScript Object Notation (JSON) and binary exchange formats; and (iii) adoption of asynchronous publish–subscribe-based messaging protocols. The newly established OGC standard SensorThings API is particularly interesting to investigate for INSPIRE, as it addresses together all three topics. In this manuscript, we provide our synthesised perspective on the necessary steps for the OGC SensorThings API standard to be considered as a solution that meets the legal obligations stemming out of the INSPIRE Directive. We share our perspective on what should be done concerning: (i) data encoding; and (ii) the use of SensorThings API as a download service. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Geodata Management)
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Open AccessArticle
Georeferenced Agricultural Data for Statistical Reuse
Geosciences 2018, 8(5), 188; https://doi.org/10.3390/geosciences8050188
Received: 13 April 2018 / Revised: 4 May 2018 / Accepted: 15 May 2018 / Published: 20 May 2018
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Abstract
The guidelines to the Public Sector Information (PSI) Directive states: “opening up public sector information (PSI) for reuse brings major socioeconomic benefits”, which has been recognised in various domains. However, the reuse may be limited due to organisational and technical reasons. This study [...] Read more.
The guidelines to the Public Sector Information (PSI) Directive states: “opening up public sector information (PSI) for reuse brings major socioeconomic benefits”, which has been recognised in various domains. However, the reuse may be limited due to organisational and technical reasons. This study addresses the collaboration between the statistical and the agricultural domain using the example of the Integrated Administration and Control System (IACS) and the Integrated Farm Statistics (IFS). After the comparison of the spatial data requirements in IACS and IFS, a conceptual collaboration model was developed that makes clear how the challenges of interoperability can be resolved by technical arrangements and work organisation. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Geodata Management)
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Open AccessArticle
Metadata Life Cycles, Use Cases and Hierarchies
Geosciences 2018, 8(5), 179; https://doi.org/10.3390/geosciences8050179
Received: 3 April 2018 / Revised: 7 May 2018 / Accepted: 11 May 2018 / Published: 15 May 2018
Cited by 1 | PDF Full-text (2977 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
The historic view of metadata as “data about data” is expanding to include data about other items that must be created, used, and understood throughout the data and project life cycles. In this context, metadata might better be defined as the structured and [...] Read more.
The historic view of metadata as “data about data” is expanding to include data about other items that must be created, used, and understood throughout the data and project life cycles. In this context, metadata might better be defined as the structured and standard part of documentation, and the metadata life cycle can be described as the metadata content that is required for documentation in each phase of the project and data life cycles. This incremental approach to metadata creation is similar to the spiral model used in software development. Each phase also has distinct users and specific questions to which they need answers. In many cases, the metadata life cycle involves hierarchies where latter phases have increased numbers of items. The relationships between metadata in different phases can be captured through structure in the metadata standard, or through conventions for identifiers. Metadata creation and management can be streamlined and simplified by re-using metadata across many records. Many of these ideas have been developed to various degrees in several Geoscience disciplines and are being used in metadata for documenting the integrated life cycle of environmental research in the Arctic, including projects, collection sites, and datasets. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Geodata Management)
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Open AccessArticle
A Javascript GIS Platform Based on Invocable Geospatial Web Services
Geosciences 2018, 8(4), 139; https://doi.org/10.3390/geosciences8040139
Received: 28 January 2018 / Revised: 10 April 2018 / Accepted: 17 April 2018 / Published: 20 April 2018
PDF Full-text (3035 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text | Supplementary Files
Abstract
Semantic Web technologies are being increasingly adopted by the geospatial community during last decade through the utilization of open standards for expressing and serving geospatial data. This was also dramatically assisted by the ever-increasing access and usage of geographic mapping and location-based services [...] Read more.
Semantic Web technologies are being increasingly adopted by the geospatial community during last decade through the utilization of open standards for expressing and serving geospatial data. This was also dramatically assisted by the ever-increasing access and usage of geographic mapping and location-based services via smart devices in people’s daily activities. In this paper, we explore the developmental framework of a pure JavaScript client-side GIS platform exclusively based on invocable geospatial Web services. We also extend JavaScript utilization on the server side by deploying a node server acting as a bridge between open source WPS libraries and popular geoprocessing engines. The vehicle for such an exploration is a cross platform Web browser capable of interpreting JavaScript commands to achieve interaction with geospatial providers. The tool is a generic Web interface providing capabilities of acquiring spatial datasets, composing layouts and applying geospatial processes. In an ideal form the end-user will have to identify those services, which satisfy a geo-related need and put them in the appropriate row. The final output may act as a potential collector of freely available geospatial web services. Its server-side components may exploit geospatial processing suppliers composing that way a light-weight fully transparent open Web GIS platform. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Geodata Management)
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