Special Issue "Structural, Tectonic, and Magmatic Evolution of Rifted Continental Margins"

A special issue of Geosciences (ISSN 2076-3263). This special issue belongs to the section "Structural Geology and Tectonics".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 20 December 2020.

Special Issue Editors

Dr. Christian Schiffer
Website1 Website2
Guest Editor
Department of Earth Sciences, Uppsala University, 75236 Uppsala, Sweden
Interests: geophysics; numerical modeling; geodynamics; lithosphere; plate tectonics; structural inheritance; North Atlantic; Arctic
Dr. Alexander L. Peace
Website1 Website2
Guest Editor
School of Geography and Earth Sciences, McMaster University, Hamilton, Ontario, L8S 4K1, Canada
Interests: structural geology; rift tectonics; rift-related magmatism; passive margins; rift basins; seismic interpretation; potential field data; petroleum geology; plate reconstructions
Dr. Scott Jess
Website
Guest Editor
Department of Geoscience, University of Calgary, University of Calgary, T2N 1N4 Calgary, AB, Canada
Interests: thermochronology; geochronology; thermal modelling; tectonic; geomorphoology; passive margins; rifting; North Atlantic

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

More than half of the Earth’s continental margins are classified as passive, rifted continental margins. These formed by rifting and eventual continental breakup, leaving a complex and variable transition from continental to oceanic lithosphere.

Although rifted continental margins have been studied for decades, many aspects of their evolution are inconclusively studied and poorly constrained, with questions surrounding, for example, the role of magmatism, continent–ocean boundaries/transitions, onshore histories, and structural inheritance still unanswered.

We invite contributions studying rifted margins covering a wide range of scales and methods. This may include but is not limited to studies of the lithosphere–asthenosphere system, crust and lithosphere structure and deformation, sedimentary basins, surface processes, landscape evolution, vertical motions, intraplate deformation, as well as rift-related magmatism at all depths. Methods and approaches may include geomorphology, geochronological and geothermometrical techniques, sedimentology and stratigraphy, rock mechanics, structural geology, geophysics, geochemistry, petrology, and numerical modeling across the scales. We also welcome studies of rifted margins bordering marine basins with transitional or unknown lithospheric affinity (e.g., Baffin Bay, Canada Basin, Black Sea), “proto-oceanic” basins (e.g., the Northern Red Sea), and failed rifts (e.g., the North Sea), as well as onshore analogue studies of rifted margins (e.g., Alpine Tethys, Iapetus, Rheic margins).

Dr. Christian Schiffer
Dr. Alexander L. Peace
Dr. Scott Jess
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Geosciences is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1200 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Breakup
  • Rifting
  • Rifted continental margins
  • Evolution
  • Structure
  • Magmatism
  • Structural inheritance
  • Cross-scale
  • Cross-disciplinary research

Published Papers (2 papers)

Order results
Result details
Select all
Export citation of selected articles as:

Research

Open AccessArticle
The Rockall and the Orphan Basins of the Southern North Atlantic Ocean: Determining Continuous Basins across Conjugate Margins
Geosciences 2020, 10(5), 178; https://doi.org/10.3390/geosciences10050178 - 13 May 2020
Abstract
Reconstructions of the opening of the North Atlantic Ocean generally result in the Orphan Basin, offshore Newfoundland, Canada, lying approximately conjugate to the rift basins on the Irish Atlantic margin at the onset of seafloor spreading toward the end of the Early Cretaceous. [...] Read more.
Reconstructions of the opening of the North Atlantic Ocean generally result in the Orphan Basin, offshore Newfoundland, Canada, lying approximately conjugate to the rift basins on the Irish Atlantic margin at the onset of seafloor spreading toward the end of the Early Cretaceous. Most of these plate reconstructions have involved rigid plates with plate motions based solely on the interpretation of oceanic magnetic anomalies. In particular, these reconstructions often show the Rockall Basin, west of Ireland, forming a continuous Mesozoic basin with the West Orphan Basin, offshore Newfoundland. However, more recent plate reconstructions involving deformable plates have called this conjugate relationship into question. The goal of this study is to investigate the validity of this potentially continuous basin system by reconstructing and restoring present-day seismically-constrained geological models both spatially and temporally back to their original configurations pre-rift. By comparing the reconstructions in terms of sedimentary package thicknesses and crustal thicknesses in 3D, using both rigid and deformable plate reconstructions to orient the reconstructed models, we are able to test different basin connectivity scenarios using a multidisciplinary approach. Our analysis provides subsurface geophysical support for the hypothesis that the Rockall Basin was originally conjugate to and continuous with the East Orphan Basin during Jurassic rifting, later linking to the West Orphan Basin as rifting evolved during the Early Cretaceous. This complex basin evolution example highlights the need for using 3D rifting mechanism models to properly understand the fundamental driving forces during rifting and has significant implications for assessing basin prospectivity across conjugate margin pairs. Full article
Show Figures

Figure 1

Open AccessArticle
Geochemistry of Deccan Tholeiite Flows and Dykes of Elephanta Island: Insights into the Stratigraphy and Structure of the Panvel Flexure Zone, Western Indian Rifted Margin
Geosciences 2020, 10(4), 118; https://doi.org/10.3390/geosciences10040118 - 26 Mar 2020
Cited by 1
Abstract
Elephanta Island near Mumbai is an important area for understanding the stratigraphic and structural framework of the Deccan flood basalt province in the tectonically disturbed Panvel flexure zone on the western Indian rifted margin. Elephanta exposes a west-dipping, 66–65 Ma sequence of tholeiitic [...] Read more.
Elephanta Island near Mumbai is an important area for understanding the stratigraphic and structural framework of the Deccan flood basalt province in the tectonically disturbed Panvel flexure zone on the western Indian rifted margin. Elephanta exposes a west-dipping, 66–65 Ma sequence of tholeiitic lava flows and dykes. Geochemical correlations with the thick, horizontal, 66–65 Ma Western Ghats sequence to the east show that lava flows of the Khandala and Ambenali formations are present at Elephanta, with two lava flows probably being locally derived. The Elephanta tholeiites have experienced crystal fractionation and accumulation, particularly of olivine. They have εNd(t) ranging from +5.4 to −7.9 and (87Sr/86Sr)t from 0.70391 to 0.70784, with most tholeiites little contaminated by continental lithosphere, probably lower crust. Field and geochemical data indicate a normal fault along the central part of Elephanta with a 220 m downthrow, consistent with a domino-type block-faulted structure of Elephanta, and the surrounding area as previously known. Seventeen of the 20 analyzed Elephanta intrusions, striking ~N–S, belong to the Coastal dyke swarm of the western Deccan province. Several of these are probable feeders to the Ambenali Formation in the Western Ghats sequence, requiring reconsideration of the current view that the voluminous Wai Subgroup lavas of the Western Ghats were erupted without organized crustal extension. East–west-directed extensional strain was already active at 66–65 Ma along this future (62.5 Ma) rifted continental margin. A young (~62 Ma) ankaramite dyke on Elephanta Island is a probable feeder to the Powai ankaramite flow in the 62.5 Ma Mumbai sequence 20 km to the northwest. Full article
Show Figures

Figure 1

Back to TopTop